Allied Warships

HMS Jersey (F 72)

Destroyer of the J class


HMS Jersey as completed

NavyThe Royal Navy
TypeDestroyer
ClassJ 
PennantF 72 
Built byJ.S. White & Co. (Cowes, U.K.) 
Ordered25 Mar 1937 
Laid down28 Sep 1937 
Launched26 Sep 1938 
Commissioned28 Apr 1939 
Lost2 May 1941 
Loss position35° 54'N, 14° 32'E
History

HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. Anthony Frank Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) was mined and sunk off Valletta, Malta in position 35°54'N, 14°32'E.

 

Commands listed for HMS Jersey (F 72)

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CommanderFromTo
1Lt.Cdr. Alec Murray McKillop, RN14 Apr 1939late 1939

2Lt.Cdr. Walter Evershed, RN30 Aug 19408 Jan 1941
3Lt.Cdr. Anthony Frank Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN8 Jan 19412 May 1941

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Notable events involving Jersey include:


The page for this destroyer was last updated in May 2021.

1 Sep 1939
Around 2015/1, the light cruisers HMS Southampton (Capt. F.W.H. Jeans, CVO, RN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral G.F.B. Edward-Collins, CB, KCVO, RN), HMS Glasgow (Capt. F.H. Pegram, RN) and the destroyers HMS Jervis (Capt. P.J. Mack, RN), HMS Jackal (Cdr. T.M. Napier, RN), HMS Javelin (Cdr. A.F. Pugsley, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. D.B. Wyburd, RN), departed Grimsby for a patrol off the coast of Norway. (1)

4 Sep 1939
Early in the afternoon, HMS Southampton (Capt. F.W.H. Jeans, CVO, RN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral G.F.B. Edward-Collins, CB, KCVO, RN) intercepts the German merchant Johannes Molkenbuhr (5294 GRT, built 1936) off Stadlandet, Norway in position 61°40'N, 03°51'E. The Germans scuttled their ship, which was en-route from Montreal to Germany, before it could be captured. The crew was taken off by HMS Jervis (Capt. P.J. Mack, RN). The ship was then finished off by HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN).

6 Sep 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) arrived at Kirkwall at 0630 hours where the German prisoners were landed.

HMS Jersey then proceeded to Scapa Flow to oil.

She departed Scapa Flow at 1800 hours to proceed to Rosyth where she arrived at 0830/7. (2)

7 Sep 1939
In the evening HMS Jervis (Capt. P.J. Mack, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) departed Rosyth around 1600 hours for an A/S hunt in the Firth of Forth. They returned around 2200 hours. (2)

8 Sep 1939
Shortly after noon on the 8th, the light cruisers HMS Southampton (Capt. F.W.H. Jeans, CVO, RN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral G.F.B. Edward-Collins, CB, KCVO, RN), HMS Glasgow (Capt. F.H. Pegram, RN) and the destroyers HMS Jervis (Capt. P.J. Mack, RN), HMS Javelin (Cdr. A.F. Pugsley, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. D.B. Wyburd, RN) departed Rosyth for a patrol in the North Sea to intercept German shipping between Rotterdam and Hamburg.

Nothing of interest was sighted and the ships returned to Rosyth around 1800/9. (1)

10 Sep 1939
Around 1800 hours, the light cruisers HMS Southampton (Capt. F.W.H. Jeans, CVO, RN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral G.F.B. Edward-Collins, CB, KCVO, RN), HMS Glasgow (Capt. F.H. Pegram, RN) and the destroyers HMS Jervis (Capt. P.J. Mack, RN), HMS Javelin (Cdr. A.F. Pugsley, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. D.B. Wyburd, RN) departed Rosyth for Sheerness. (1)

11 Sep 1939
Around 1200 hours, the light cruisers HMS Southampton (Capt. F.W.H. Jeans, CVO, RN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral G.F.B. Edward-Collins, CB, KCVO, RN), HMS Glasgow (Capt. F.H. Pegram, RN) and the destroyers HMS Jervis (Capt. P.J. Mack, RN), HMS Javelin (Cdr. A.F. Pugsley, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. D.B. Wyburd, RN) arrived at Sheerness from Rosyth. They had been sent to Sheerness to be in a position to provide cover for minelaying operations in the Dover Strait, if this was needed.

In the evening they all sailed for patrol returning to Sheerness the following morning. (1)

13 Sep 1939
HMS Southampton (Capt. F.W.H. Jeans, CVO, RN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral G.F.B. Edward-Collins, CB, KCVO, RN), HMS Glasgow (Capt. F.H. Pegram, RN) and the destroyers HMS Jervis (Capt. P.J. Mack, RN), HMS Javelin (Cdr. A.F. Pugsley, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. D.B. Wyburd, RN) departed Sheerness around 0345 hours for a patrol off the Nore. They returned to Sheerness around 1445 hours. (1)

14 Sep 1939
HMS Southampton (Capt. F.W.H. Jeans, CVO, RN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral G.F.B. Edward-Collins, CB, KCVO, RN), HMS Glasgow (Capt. F.H. Pegram, RN) and the destroyers HMS Jervis (Capt. P.J. Mack, RN), HMS Javelin (Cdr. A.F. Pugsley, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. D.B. Wyburd, RN) departed Sheerness around 0615 hours for patrol. They arrived at Grimsby around 2330 hours. (3)

16 Sep 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) shifted from Grimsby to Sheerness. (2)

17 Sep 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) shifted from Sheerness to the Chatham Dockyard. (2)

18 Sep 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) is docked at the Chatham Dockyard for repairs. (2)

20 Sep 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) is undocked at the Chatham Dockyard following repairs. (2)

21 Sep 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) departed the Chatham Dockyard for Rosyth. (2)

22 Sep 1939
To conduct an operation against German shipping off the Norwegian coast the light cruiser HMS Aurora (Capt. G.B. Middleton, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral R.H.C. Hallifax, RN) and the destroyers HMS Tartar (Capt. G.H. Warner, DSC, RN), HMS Punjabi (Cdr. J.T. Lean, RN), HMS Eskimo (Cdr. St. J.A. Micklethwait, RN) and HMS Bedouin (Cdr. J.A. McCoy, RN) departed Scapa Flow as well as the light cruisers HMS Southampton (Capt. F.W.H. Jeans, CVO, RN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral G.F.B. Edward-Collins, CB, KCVO, RN), HMS Sheffield (Capt. E. de F. Renouf, CVO, RN), HMS Glasgow (Capt. F.H. Pegram, RN) and the destroyers HMS Jervis (Capt. P.J. Mack, RN), HMS Javelin (Cdr. A.F. Pugsley, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. D.B. Wyburd, RN) departed Rosyth. HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN), coming from the Chatham Dockyard, joined at sea.

To provide cover for this operation two forces were deployed from Scapa Flow. One force was made up of the battlecruisers HMS Hood (Capt. I.G. Glennie, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral W.J. Whitworth, CB, DSO, RN), HMS Repulse (Capt. E.J. Spooner, DSO, RN) and the destroyers HMS Fame (Cdr. P.N. Walter, RN), HMS Firedrake (Lt.Cdr. S.H. Norris, RN), HMS Foresight (Lt.Cdr. G.T. Lambert, RN) and HMS Fortune (Cdr. E.A. Gibbs, RN).

The other force was made up of the battleships HMS Nelson (Capt. G.J.A. Miles, RN, flying the flag of Admiral J.M. Forbes, KCB, DSO, RN), HMS Rodney (Capt. E.N. Syfret, RN), aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal (Capt. A.J. Power, RN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral L.V. Wells, CB, DSO, RN) and the destroyers HMS Faulknor (Capt. C.S. Daniel, RN), HMS Fearless (Cdr. K.L. Harkness, RN), HMS Foxhound (Lt.Cdr. P.H. Hadow, RN), HMS Somali (Capt. R.S.G. Nicholson, DSC, RN), HMS Mashona (Cdr. P.V. McLaughlin, RN) and HMS Matabele (Cdr. G.K. Whitmy-Smith, RN). Later the destroyers HMS Forester (Lt.Cdr. E.B. Tancock, RN), HMS Fury (Cdr. G.F. Burghard, RN), HMS Esk (Lt.Cdr. R.J.H. Couch, RN) and HMS Express (Cdr. J.G. Bickford, RN) joined at sea.

The raid was abandoned when HMS Javelin and HMS Jersey collided in position 57°09'N, 03°08'W at 2038/22.

All forces returned to their port of departure on 23 September but not before HMS Hood reported an explosion at 1330/23. The destroyers HMS Firedrake and HMS Fortune were detached to investigate but no contact was obtained. In fact this was indeed an attack by a German submarine; U-24 which reported to have made a failed torpedo attack at 1328/23 on HMS Hood and two escorting destroyers.

23 Sep 1939
Shortly after noon, HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN), parted company with HMS Jervis (Capt. P.J. Mack, RN), HMS Javelin (Cdr. A.F. Pugsley, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. D.B. Wyburd, RN). HMS Jersey then proceeded to Leith for repairs to her collision damage.

HMS Jersey was escorted to Leith by HMS Bedouin (Cdr. J.A. McCoy, RN) and HMS Punjabi (Cdr. J.T. Lean, RN).

HMS Jersey arrived at Leith around 1530 hours. (2)

24 Sep 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) is docked at Leith for repairs. (2)

8 Oct 1939
A force of German warships departed Kiel to operate off the south coast of Norway. They were to sink Allied shipping and lure the British Home Fleet into the range of Luftwaffe aircraft. This force was made up of the battlecruiser Gneisenau, light cruiser Köln and the destroyers Z 3 / Max Schultz, Z 5 / Paul Jacobi, Z 11 / Bernd von Arnim, Z/14 Friedrich Ihn, Z 15 / Erich Steinbrinck, Z 16 / Friedrich Eckholdt, Z 17 / Diether von Roeder, Z 20 / Karl Galster, Z 21 / Wilhelm Heidkamp. In addition, four submarines were deployed in a patrol line to attack the Home Fleet, these were U-10, U-18, U-20 and U-23.

The Admiralty took the bait and around 1600/8 the battlecruisers HMS Hood (Capt. I.G. Glennie, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral W.J. Whitworth, CB, DSO, RN), HMS Repulse (Capt. E.J. Spooner, DSO, RN), light cruisers HMS Aurora (Capt. G.B. Middleton, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral R.H.C. Hallifax, RN) and HMS Sheffield (Capt. E. de F. Renouf, CVO, RN) and the destroyers HMS Somali (Capt. R.S.G. Nicholson, DSC, RN), HMS Mashona (Cdr. P.V. McLaughlin, RN), HMS Eskimo (Cdr. St. J.A. Micklethwait, RN) and HMS Ashanti (Cdr. W.G. Davis, RN) departed Scapa Flow for a position about 50 miles to the north-west of Stadlandet, Norway.

Around 1900 hours the battleships HMS Nelson (Capt. G.J.A. Miles, RN, flying the flag of Admiral J.M. Forbes, KCB, DSO, RN), HMS Rodney (Capt. E.N. Syfret, RN), aircraft carrier HMS Furious (Capt. M.L. Clarke, DSC, RN), light cruiser HMS Newcastle (Capt. J. Figgins, RN) and the destroyers HMS Faulknor (Capt. C.S. Daniel, RN), HMS Fame (Cdr. P.N. Walter, RN), HMS Firedrake (Lt.Cdr. S.H. Norris, RN), HMS Foresight (Lt.Cdr. G.T. Lambert, RN), HMS Forester (Lt.Cdr. E.B. Tancock, RN), HMS Fury (Cdr. G.F. Burghard, RN), HMS Punjabi (Cdr. J.T. Lean, RN) and HMS Bedouin (Cdr. J.A. McCoy, RN) departed Scapa Flow for a position north of Muckle Flugga. Both forces were to reach their positions by dawn the following day and then steam towards each other in a pincer movement to cut off the German ships from their home ports.

The light cruisers HMS Southampton (Capt. F.W.H. Jeans, CVO, RN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral G.F.B. Edward-Collins, CB, KCVO, RN), HMS Glasgow (Capt. F.H. Pegram, RN), HMS Edinburgh (Capt. F.C. Bradley, RN) and the destroyers HMS Jervis (Capt. P.J. Mack, RN), HMS Jaguar (Lt.Cdr. J.F.W. Hine, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. D.B. Wyburd, RN). They were joined at sea by the destroyers HMS Jackal (Cdr. T.M. Napier, RN) and HMS Janus (Lt.Cdr. J.A.W. Tothill, RN) which came from Grimsby. This force was ordered to operate off the western end of the Skagerrak and then sweep northwards.

At 0600/9 HMS Jaguar was ordered to return to Rosyth to refuel. En-route there she was attacked by German aircraft but she was not hit.

HMS Jervis and HMS Jupiter were ordered to search for the small Danish merchant vessel Teddy (503 GRT, built 1907) which had reported that she had picked up the crew of a German flying boat whih was shot down on the 8th. They were attacked by German aircraft at 1518/9, but neither destroyer was damaged. However, about 1.5 hours laters HMS Jupiter broke down and had to be taken in tow by her sister ship.

HMS Jaguar meanwhile had completed refuelling at Rosyth. She left that port together with HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) which just finished repairs to the damage sustained in her collision of 22 September.

The were ordered to screen the withdrawal of HMS Jervis and HMS Jupiter. But it was not to be as shorty after departing Rosyth, Jaguar struck a small islet above the Forth bridge and damaged her starboard propeller shaft and HMS Jersey struck the Rosyth boom defence. Both destroyers proceeded to Leith for repairs.

Between 1120 and 1645/9 the Luftwaffe heavily bombed the 'Humber force' made up at that time of HMS Southampton, HMS Glasgow, HMS Edinburgh, HMS Jackal and HMS Janus which had arrived off the western entrance to the Skagerrak by that time. HMS Southampton and HMS Glasgow were near missed but were not damaged.

The German force returned to Kiel shortlyafter midnight during the night of 9/10 October. This news reached the C-in-C, Home Fleet in the afternoon of the 10th after which all ships were ordered to return to port.

HMS Nelson, HMS Rodney, HMS Hood, HMS Faulknor, HMS Firedrake, HMS Forester, HMS Fury, HMS Bedouin and HMS Punjabi proceeded to Loch Ewe arriving on the 11th.

HMS Repulse, HMS Furious, HMS Aurora, HMS Newcastle, HMS Southampton, HMS Glasgow, HMS Somali, HMS Mashona, HMS Eskimo, HMS Ashanti, HMS Fame, HMS Foresight, HMS Jervis, HMS Jackal, HMS Janus and HMS Jupiter (which by now as able to proceed under her own power) arrived at Scapa Flow on the 11th. They had been joined at sea before arrival by two more destroyers which came from Scapa Flow; HMS Fearless (Cdr. K.L. Harkness, RN) and HMS Foxhound (Lt.Cdr. P.H. Hadow, RN).

HMS Edinburgh had been detached and proceeded to Rosyth.

HMS Sheffield had already been detached on the 9th with orders to patrol in the Denmark Strait.

9 Oct 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) is undocked at Leith upon completion of her colission repairs. She immediately left for Rosyth where she arrived later the same day.

She departed Rosyth for operations late on the 9th but returned shortly afterwards. [see the event for 8 October 1939 for more info on these operations.] (4)

13 Oct 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) is towed from Rosyth to Leith for repairs.

At Leith she is almost immediately docked. (4)

15 Oct 1939
The battleships HMS Nelson (Capt. G.J.A. Miles, RN, flying the flag of Admiral J.M. Forbes, KCB, DSO, RN), HMS Rodney (Capt. E.N. Syfret, RN), battlecruiser HMS Hood (Capt. I.G. Glennie, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral W.J. Whitworth, CB, DSO, RN), HMS Furious (Capt. M.L. Clarke, DSC, RN), light cruisers HMS Aurora (Capt. G.B. Middleton, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral R.H.C. Hallifax, RN), HMS Belfast (Capt. G.A. Scott, DSC, RN) and the destroyers HMS Bedouin (Cdr. J.A. McCoy, RN), HMS Fearless (Cdr. K.L. Harkness, RN), HMS Foxhound (Lt.Cdr. P.H. Hadow, RN) and HMS Fury (Cdr. G.F. Burghard, RN).

They were to patrol north of Iceland as it was thought the German pocket battleship Deutschland was proceeding into the Atlantic. From this position they were able to support the Northern Patrol.

More destroyers later joined at sea; HMS Mashona (Cdr. P.V. McLaughlin, RN), HMS Matabele (Cdr. G.K. Whitmy-Smith, RN), HMS Punjabi (Cdr. J.T. Lean, RN and HMS Firedrake (Lt.Cdr. S.H. Norris, RN) departed Scapa Flow on the 15th. They were followed on the 16th by HMS Forester (Lt.Cdr. E.B. Tancock, RN).

On the 18th the battlecruiser HMS Repulse (Capt. E.J. Spooner, DSO, RN), which had completed boiler cleaning, departed Rosyth escorted by the destroyers HMS Jervis (Capt. P.J. Mack, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN), HMS Cossack (Capt. D. de Pass, RN) and HMS Maori (Cdr. G.N. Brewer, RN). HMS Cossack and HMS Maori returned to Rosyth on the 19th. HMS Repulse, HMS Jervis and HMS Jersey joined the fleet at sea on the 20th but HMS Jervis and HMS Jersey were detached to Sullum Voe shortly afterwards.

HMS Nelson, HMS Rodney, HMS Hood, HMS Repulse, HMS Furious, HMS Aurora, HMS Belfast, HMS Bedouin, HMS Mashona, HMS Matabele, HMS Punjabi, HMS Fearless, HMS Firedrake, HMS Forester, HMS Foxhound and HMS Fury arrived at Loch Ewe on 22 October.

16 Oct 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) completed her repairs at Leith. After being undocked she immediately left for patrol. (4)

17 Oct 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) arrived at Rosyth after patrol. (4)

22 Oct 1939
Around 0800 hours, HMS Jervis (Capt. P.J. Mack, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN), arrived at Sullom Voe to fuel.

They departed again for patrol around 1645 hours. (4)

25 Oct 1939
Around 1700 hours, HMS Jervis (Capt. P.J. Mack, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN), arrived at Rosyth from a patrol near the Norwegian coast. (4)

26 Oct 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) departed Rosyth for the Humber. (4)

27 Oct 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) arrived at Immingham from Rosyth.

She departed for patrol later the same day. (4)

28 Oct 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) returned to the Humber from patrol. (4)

29 Oct 1939
HMS Jervis (Capt. P.J. Mack, RN), HMS Jackal (Cdr. T.M. Napier, RN), HMS Janus (Lt.Cdr. J.A.W. Tothill, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN), HMS Juno (Cdr. W.E. Wilson, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. D.B. Wyburd, RN) departed Immingham for operation AG, during which they were to patrol along the Dutch coast.

A German seaplane bombed HMS Jersey but no damage was done to her.

The destroyers returned to Immingham on 30 October. (5)

31 Oct 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) departed Immingham for east coast convoy escort duty.

She returned to the Humber the following day. (6)

1 Nov 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) departed Grimsby, presumably for east coast patrol and escort duties. She returned to Grimsby on 3 November. (7)

3 Nov 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) departed Grimsby, presumably for east coast patrol and escort duties. She returned to the Humber (Immingham) on 5 November. (7)

8 Nov 1939
HMS Jervis (Capt. P.J. Mack, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) departed Immingham for east coast convoy escort duty (with convoy FN 33). They returned to Immingham later the same day. (8)

10 Nov 1939
HMS Jaguar (Lt.Cdr. J.F.W. Hine, RN), HMS Janus (Lt.Cdr. J.A.W. Tothill, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) and HMS Juno (Cdr. W.E. Wilson, RN) departed Immingham for patrol and to cover east coast convoys.

HMS Janus and HMS Juno returned to the Humber later the same day. HMS Jaguar and HMS Jersey returned the following day. (9)

12 Nov 1939
HMS Jaguar (Lt.Cdr. J.F.W. Hine, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) departed the Humber for patrol and escort duty. They returned later the same day. (10)

14 Nov 1939
THe AA cruiser HMS Calcutta (Capt. H.A. Packer, RN) and the destroyers HMS Jaguar (Lt.Cdr. J.F.W. Hine, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) departed the Humber to escort convoy FS 36. They returned to the Humber later the same day.

16 Nov 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) departed Grimsby presumably for patrol and / or escort duty. She returned to Grimsby the following day. (7)

19 Nov 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) departed the Humber for patrol and escort duty (with convoy FN 39). She returned to the Humber the following day. (7)

22 Nov 1939
In the morning, the destroyers HMS Jaguar (Lt.Cdr. J.F.W. Hine, RN), HMS Janus (Lt.Cdr. J.A.W. Tothill, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) and HMS Juno (Cdr. W.E. Wilson, RN) departed Immingham for operation BT 2, in which they were to conduct a patrol in the North Sea.

They returned to Immingham in the evening of the following day. (9)

30 Nov 1939
Around 1500/30, HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. D.B. Wyburd, RN) departed Immingham for patrol.

They returned to Immingham around 1815/1. (11)

1 Dec 1939
HMS Jackal (Cdr. T.M. Napier, RN), HMS Jaguar (Lt.Cdr. J.F.W. Hine, RN), HMS Janus (Lt.Cdr. J.A.W. Tothill, RN) and HMS Juno (Cdr. W.E. Wilson, RN) departed Immingham for patrol. At sea they joined HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. D.B. Wyburd, RN) which already had been on patrol.

HMS Jackal and HMS Jaguar returned to Immingham later the same day with HMS Jersey and HMS Jupiter.

HMS Janus and HMS Juno returned to Immingham the following morning. (12)

2 Dec 1939
HMS Jaguar (Lt.Cdr. J.F.W. Hine, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) departed Immingham around 1430/2 for patrol. They returned to Immingham around 1100/3. (13)

6 Dec 1939
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) and HMS Juno (Cdr. W.E. Wilson, RN) departed Immingham for patrol.

At 0233/7 (British time), HMS Jersey was struck by a torpedo.

During the night of 6/7 December 1939 the German destroyer Z 12 / Erich Giese escorted by her sister ship Z 10 / Hans Lody was on an offensive mining operation off Cromer. At 0255 hours (German time), just 15 minutes after the lay had been completed, the German ships sighted two British destroyers about 8000 meters away. The Germans turned to a parallel course and by 0310 hours (German time) had closed range to 4600 meters while remaining undetected themselves. Z 10 / Hans Lody fired three torpedoes at HMS Juno, the leading British ship while Z 12 / Erich Giese sent four more torpedoes at HMS Jersey. Z 10 / Hans Lody's salvo missed, but Z 12 / Erich Giese scored a hit with one torpedo. The blow started a large fire and caused serious damage. HMS Juno turned back to assist HMS Jersey, making smoke; apparently the British believed a submarine had attacked them. The Germans still had the advantage of surprise and fired at least five more torpedoes, but then they decided to break off the action and return for home.

HMS Juno took HMS Jersey in tow and was then screened by HMS Jackal (Cdr. T.M. Napier, RN). Later HMS Janus (Lt.Cdr. J.A.W. Tothill, RN) also arrived at the scene and a tug took over the tow from HMS Juno. HMS Jersey was then towed to Immingham. These two destroyers had come from the Humber to render assistance.

HMS Jersey was under repair until 23 September 1940.

7 Dec 1939
Around 1545/5, HMS Jaguar (Lt.Cdr. J.F.W. Hine, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. D.B. Wyburd, RN) departed Immingham. At sea they encountered the damaged HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) and her sister ships HMS Janus (Lt.Cdr. J.A.W. Tothill, RN) and HMS Juno (Cdr. W.E. Wilson, RN).

HMS Janus and HMS Jaguar then proceeded on patrol for the night. They returned to Immingham the following morning.

The damaged HMS Jersey then continued on to the Humber as did HMS Juno and HMS Jupiter.

9 Dec 1939
The badly damaged HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.M. McKillop, RN) is docked at Immingham.

In January 1940 she was taken to Hull for permanent repairs.

Repairs were completed in late September 1940.

24 Sep 1940
With her repairs completed, HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN), shifted from Hull to Immingham. A period of trials and exercises now followed [no further details available]. (14)

28 Sep 1940
HMS Jupiter (Cdr. D.B. Wyburd, RN, with Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, GCVO, RN = Capt.(D.5) on board), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN), HMS Javelin (Cdr. A.F. Pugsley, RN), HMS Jaguar (Lt.Cdr. J.F.W. Hine, RN) and HMS Kelvin (Cdr. J.H. Allison, DSO, RN) conducted exercises off the Humber. (14)

10 Oct 1940
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) set off a mine when leaving the Humber and sustained some damage, repairs were carried out in the docks in London.

10 Oct 1940
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) departed Immingham after post-repair trials and exercises for Plymouth to join the rest of her Flotilla.

11 Oct 1940
While on passage from the Humber to Plymouth, HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN), is damaged the East Knob Buoy by the explosion of a mine close aboard. She then proceeded to Sheerness as repairs were needed before she could rejoin her Flotilla at Plymouth.

For these repairs she went to a shipyard in London.

27 Oct 1940
With her repairs completed HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) shifted from London to Sheerness. (15)

28 Oct 1940
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) departed Sheerness for Plymouth. (15)

29 Oct 1940
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) arrived at Plymouth where she rejoined her sister ships of the 5th Destroyer Flotilla. (15)

4 Nov 1940
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) departed Plymouth for exercises (including night exercises). (15)

5 Nov 1940
In the evening, HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN), returned to Plymouth from exercises. (15)

6 Nov 1940
HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) departed Plymouth [presumably for a patrol but we have been unable to find confirmation for this in documents].

They returned to Plymouth the next day. (16)

7 Nov 1940
HMS H 43 (Lt. H.R.B. Newton, RN) conducted A/S exercises off Plymouth with HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN).

Upon completing these exercises HMS H 43 departed Plymouth for Holyhead. She was escorted by HMS Troubadour (Cdr.(Retd.) D.H. Milward, DSC, RNR). (17)

13 Nov 1940
The light cruisers HMS Newcastle (Capt. E.A. Aylmer, DSC, RN) departed Plymouth for Gibraltar. She was escorted part of the way by the destroyers HMS Kelvin (Cdr. J.H. Allison, DSO, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN).

HMS Newcastle had on board RAF personnel and stores for Malta. She was to have sailed earlier but was blocked in the harbour due to enemy mining. (18)

15 Nov 1940
HMS Kelvin (Cdr. J.H. Allison, DSO, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) arrived at Dartmouth. (19)

18 Nov 1940
HMS Jackal (Cdr. C.L. Firth, MVO, RN), HMS Jaguar (Lt.Cdr. J.F.W. Hine, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Kelvin (Cdr. J.H. Allison, DSO, RN) departed Dartmouth for patrol. They were to patrol between Start Point and the Lizard. (19)

19 Nov 1940
HMS Jackal (Cdr. C.L. Firth, MVO, RN), HMS Jaguar (Lt.Cdr. J.F.W. Hine, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Kelvin (Cdr. J.H. Allison, DSO, RN) returned to Dartmouth from patrol. (19)

20 Nov 1940
HMS Jackal (Cdr. C.L. Firth, MVO, RN), HMS Jaguar (Lt.Cdr. J.F.W. Hine, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Kelvin (Cdr. J.H. Allison, DSO, RN) shifted from Dartmouth to Plymouth. (19)

23 Nov 1940
HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN with Capt.(D.5) Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, GCVO, RN on board), HMS Jackal (Cdr. C.L. Firth, MVO, RN), HMS Javelin (Cdr. A.F. Pugsley, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) departed Plymouth at 2052.

They were to intercept a German convoy but nothing was sighted. Speed had been limited by defects in HMS Jackal. The destroyers returned to Plymouth at 1025/24. (16)

24 Nov 1940
HMS Javelin (Cdr. A.F. Pugsley, RN, with Capt.(D.5) Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, GCVO, RN on board), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN), HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) and HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN) departed Plymouth at 2150 to patrol between the Lizard and the Scillies Islands as three German destroyers had been reported to have left Brest and were thought to be operating off the South coast between 06'W and 01.30'W. They were intially ordered to return to Plymouth at 0930/25 but his order was cancelled at 1925/24.

Around midnight a group of three German destroyers (Z 4 / Richard Beitzen, Z 10 / Hans Lody and Z 20 / Karl Galster attacked a group of fishing trawlers near Wolf Rock. The Belgian trawler Marguetite Simonne was sunk and the British trawler Lent Lily was damaged.

Shortly afterwards they attacked a small convoy from which the Dutch merchant tanker Apollonia (2086 GRT, built 1931) was sunk and the Norwegian merchant vessel Stadion II (629 GRT, built 1914) was damaged.

The 5th destroyer flotilla however made no contact with the enemy despite that they swept towards Ushant to cut off the enemy when returning to Brest.

The destroyers were joined by HMS Jackal (Cdr. C.L. Firth, MVO, RN) on the 25th. Jackal departed Plymouth at 1700/25. The Admiralty feared that German destroyers would carry out another raid during the night of 25/26 November.

During the night of 25/26 November Capt. D.5 swept with his 5 destroyers to a position to the west of Ushant.

The destroyers arrived back at Plymouth at 1030/26. (19)

27 Nov 1940
HMS Javelin (Cdr. A.F. Pugsley, RN, with Capt.(D.5) Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, GCVO, RN on board), HMS Jackal (Cdr. C.L. Firth, MVO, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN), HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) and HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN) departed Plymouth at 1750/27 for patrol.

28 Nov 1940
At 1556 hours, HMS Javelin (Cdr. A.F. Pugsley, RN, with Capt.(D.5) Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, GCVO, RN on board), HMS Jackal (Cdr. C.L. Firth, MVO, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN), HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) and HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN), were ordered to patrol between Land's End and Start Point during the coming night. (19)

29 Nov 1940
At 0402 hours, Capt.(D.5) Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, GCVO, RN) was informed that gunfire had been reported off Prawle Point.

At 0553 hours, HMS Jackal (Cdr. C.L. Firth, MVO, RN), who was operating together with HMS Javelin (Cdr. A.F. Pugsley, RN, with Capt.(D.5) Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, GCVO, RN on board), reported sighting three unkown ships. One minute later another signal was received from HMS Jackal stating that HMS Javelin had been torpedoed.

At 0609 hours HMS Jackal engaged an enemy destroyer but she soon lost contact.

At 0637 hours HMS Jackal sent a signal asking for tugs and an air escort for her disabled sister-ship HMS Javelin

Three minutes before, at 0634 hours, HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN), which was in company with HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN), reported that they had a lost touch with the enemy after a short action.

At 0700 hours, HMS Kashmir reported that it was thought one of the enemy destroyers had been damaged.

At 0818 hours, HMS Jackal reported that HMS Javelin was still afloat but that her bow and stern had been blown off, two tugs were requested, one on either end.

At 0834 hours, HMS Kashmir, HMS Jersey and HMS Jupiter were ordered to screen HMS Javelin.

At 0850 hours the tug HMS Caroline Moller departed Falmouth followed at 0855 by HMS Retort which sailed from Plymouth.

Also at 0850 hours three Blenheim aircraft took off as air escort.

At 1010 hours the destroyer HMS Kipling (Cdr. A. St. Clair-Ford, RN) departed Dartmouth.

At 1039 hours HMS Jackal left for Plymouth with survivors from ships attacked by the German destroyers. She arrived at Plymouth at 1347 hours.

At 1419 hours HMS Kashmir reported that enemy aircraft had attacked them.

HMS Javelin in tow of two tugs arrived at Plymouth at 0425/30.

HMS Jersey had already arrived at 0150/30 followed by HMS Jupiter at 0239 hours.

HMS Kashmir and HMS Kipling arrived at 1340/30.

The German destroyers encountered were once again the Z 4 / Richard Beitzen, Z 10 / Hans Lody and Z 20 / Karl Galster. Before their encounter with the British destoyers they had sunk the British tug Aid (134 GRT, built 1914, five dead) and damaged the French tug Abeille XIV (126 GRT, built 1927. two dead). A barge that had been under tow by the Aid sank at 1145/29. Z 10 / Hans Lody was hit several times and all German destroyers had some splinter damage. (19)

30 Nov 1940
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) departed Plymouth for Gibraltar. She had on board Admiral of the Fleet the Earl of Cork and Orrery for a Board of Inquiry over the Battle of Spartivento. (15)

2 Dec 1940
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) arrived at Gibraltar. (15)

8 Dec 1940
HMS Manchester (Capt. H.A. Packer, RN) departed Gibraltar for Scapa Flow. She was escorted by the destroyer HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, DSO, RN) until 11 December when she was detached to Plymouth. (20)

11 Dec 1940
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, DSO, RN) arrived at Plymouth from escort duty. (15)

12 Dec 1940
At 1507/12 an aircraft reported an enemy submarine in position 50°26'N, 05°20'W (to the west of Newquay on the north coast of Cornwall).

To hunt the submarine the destroyers HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN), FSS Le Triomphant (Cdr. P.M.J.R. Auboyneau) departed Plymouth and HMS Wrestler (Lt. E.L. Jones, DSC, RN) departed from Falmouth.

The hunt was discontinued at 1730/13. HMS Jersey and HMS Wrestler then proceeded to cover shipping during the night between the Lizard and Start Point. FFS Le Triomphant proceeded to the Clyde where she arrived in the evening of December, 14th.

HMS Jersey returned to Plymouth at 1122/14.

HMS Wrestler proceeded to Portsmouth where she arrived in the morning of the 15th.

17 Dec 1940
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) departed Plymouth at 1035/17 to proceed to the Dartmouth area where they were to conduct A/S exercises with the submarine HMS Seawolf (Lt. P.L. Field, RN).

On completion of the A/S exercises, HMS Jersey, HMS Jupiter and HMS Seawolf proceeded to Dartmouth.

18 Dec 1940
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) and HMS Seawolf (Lt. P.L. Field, RN) departed Dartmouth for A/S exercises.

On completion of the A/S exercises HMS Seawolf proceeded to Dartmouth while HMS Jersey and HMS Jupiter were to make rendez-vous with HMS Punjabi (Cdr. J.T. Lean, DSO, RN) off Rame Head at 1700 hours and then to proceed on patrol. HMS Punjabi had just departed from Plymouth.

They were to patrol on about 49°45'N between 04°00'W and 06°00W'. They were to arrive off Rame Head from patrol at 1030/19.

19 Dec 1940
HMS Punjabi (Cdr. J.T. Lean, DSO, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) returned to Plymouth from patrol at 1100 hours.

20 Dec 1940
HMS Punjabi (Cdr. J.T. Lean, DSO, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) departed Plymouth for patrol at 1700 hours. During the night they were to proceed to position 49.15'N, 03.00'W and then sweep towards Ushant. They were to return to Plymouth at 1030/21.

21 Dec 1940
HMS Punjabi (Cdr. J.T. Lean, DSO, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) returned to Plymouth from patrol at 1110 hours.

23 Dec 1940
HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Punjabi (Cdr. J.T. Lean, DSO, RN) were to departed Plymouth for patrol at 1700 hours. During the night they were to proceed to position 49.15'N, 03.00'W and then sweep towards Ushant. They were to return to Plymouth at 1030/24. (21)

24 Dec 1940
HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Punjabi (Cdr. J.T. Lean, DSO, RN) returned to Plymouth from patrol at 1050 hours.

27 Dec 1940
HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) departed Plymouth at 1750/27 to intercept a convoy of four small enemy merchant vessels that were sighted near Ushant at 1530/27 if these would proceed up Channel.

The destroyers were at first ordered to proceed to position 49°10'N, 03°20'W and then sweep to the westward to intercept the enemy vessels. If no contact was made when off Ushant they were to return to Plymouth arriving at 1030/28.

later they were ordered to proceed with despatch to position 48°30'N, 05°45'W as it appeared the enemy ships were returning to Brest. They were to arrive in position 180°, Lizard, 20 nautical miles by 0830/28 and then return to Plymouth with fighter protection.

The destroyers returned to Plymouth at 1058/28 not having sighted the enemy ships.

28 Dec 1940
HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) departed Plymouth in the afternoon intercept a convoy of German merchant vessels that were sighted near Ushant if these would proceed up Channel. The destroyers were ordered to return to Plymouth at 1030/29.

29 Dec 1940
At 1055 hours HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) arrived at Plymouth.

HMS Jersey and HMS Jupiter departed again at 1523 hours to join the minelayer HMS Adventure (Capt. N.V. Grace, RN) which had departed Milford Haven at 1000 hours to lay minefield GQ 2.

HMS Kashmir also departed Plymouth later on the 29th to overtake the other destroyers before they joined the minelayer.

30 Dec 1940
At 1729 hours HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) arrived at Plymouth.

HMS Adventure (Capt. N.V. Grace, RN) returned to Milford Haven at 1700 hours.

The mines had been laid successfully.

7 Jan 1941
HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) returned to Plymouth at 1043 hours. They had not sighted the enemy transport.

HMS Kashmir departed again at 2039 hours together with HMS Jersey (Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) to patrol between the Lizard and Start Point during the night.

9 Jan 1941
HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. W. Evershed, RN) returned to Plymouth at 1100 hours having been on the western Channel patrol for two nights.

10 Jan 1941
HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) departed Plymouth for the western Channel patrol.

11 Jan 1941
HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) returned to Plymouth at 1057 hours from the western Channel patrol.

12 Jan 1941
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) departed Plymouth [No further details known at the moment]. (22)

12 Jan 1941
HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) departed Plymouth at 0627 hours.

At 0843/12 they were ordered to return to Plymouth at 1030/12 by the Vice-Admiral Western Approaches.

13 Jan 1941
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) returned to Plymouth [No further details known at the moment]. (22)

15 Jan 1941
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) departed Plymouth at 1030/15 to join the battleship HMS Revenge (Capt. E.R. Archer, RN) and her two escorting destroyers; HMS Kelly (Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, GCVO, DSO, RN) and HMS Kipling (Cdr. A. St. Clair-Ford, RN) and proceed with them to Portsmouth.

The battleship and the tree escorting destroyers arrived at Portsmouth on the 16th.

17 Jan 1941
HMS Kelly (Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, GCVO, DSO, RN), HMS Kipling (Cdr. A. St. Clair-Ford, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) departed Portsmouth in the late afternoon of early evening to conduct a patrol in the western Channel as far as the Scilly Isles. They were to return to Plymouth at 1030/18.

22 Jan 1941
During the night of 22/23 January 1941 HMS Kelly (Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, GCVO, DSO, RN), HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) conducted a patrol between Land's End and Start End.

They had departed Plymouth at 1630/22 and were ordered to return around 1030/23 but they actually returned shortly before 1300/23.

23 Jan 1941
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) departed Plymouth for Gibraltar. (15)

26 Jan 1941
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) arrived at Gibraltar from Plymouth. (15)

28 Jan 1941
At 1530/28, HMS Renown (Capt R.R. McGrigor, RN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral J.F. Somerville, KCB, DSO, RN), HMS Ark Royal (Capt. C.S. Holland, RN) and their destroyer escort made up of HMS Encounter (Lt.Cdr. E.V.St.J. Morgan, RN), HMS Firedrake (Lt.Cdr. S.H. Norris, DSO, DSC, RN), HMS Foresight (Cdr. J.S.C. Salter, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) departed Gibraltar for exercises in the Alboran Sea.

Shorty afterwards the destroyer HMS Foxhound (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Peters, DSC, RN) also sailed. She had been unable to sail with the remainder of the force as she was repairing defects which were not fully completed at the time of the sailing.

Early in the evening another destroyer joined the force, this was HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.P. Thew, RN). She too had been repairing defects at the time of the sailing of the force and had been unable to sail with them at the intended time. (23)

29 Jan 1941
HMS Renown (Capt R.R. McGrigor, RN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral J.F. Somerville, KCB, DSO, RN), HMS Ark Royal (Capt. C.S. Holland, RN), HMS Encounter (Lt.Cdr. E.V.St.J. Morgan, RN), HMS Firedrake (Lt.Cdr. S.H. Norris, DSO, DSC, RN), HMS Foresight (Cdr. J.S.C. Salter, RN), HMS Foxhound (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Peters, DSC, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.P. Thew, RN) all returned to Gibraltar in the afternoon upon completion of their exercises. (23)

31 Jan 1941

Operations Picket and Result.

Operations against the Lake Omodeo Dam in central Sardinia (Picket) and the bombardment of Genoa (Result).

31 January 1941.

'Force H' departed Gibraltar for these operations. It was diverted into four groups, these were;

Group 1 was made up of the battlecruiser HMS Renown (Capt R.R. McGrigor, RN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral J.F. Somerville, KCB, DSO, RN), battleship HMS Malaya (Capt. A.F.E. Palliser, DSC, RN), aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal (Capt. C.S. Holland, RN) and the light cruiser HMS Sheffield (Capt. C.A.A. Larcom, RN).

Group 2 was made up of the destroyers HMS Fearless (Cdr. A.F. Pugsley, RN), HMS Firedrake (Lt.Cdr. S.H. Norris, DSO, DSC, RN), HMS Foresight (Cdr. J.S.C. Salter, RN), HMS Foxhound (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Peters, DSC, RN), HMS Fury (Lt.Cdr. T.C. Robinson, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN).

Group 3 was made up of the destroyers HMS Duncan (A/Capt. A.D.B. James, RN), HMS Encounter (Lt.Cdr. E.V.St.J. Morgan, RN), HMS Isis (Cdr. C.S.B. Swinley, DSC, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.P. Thew, RN).

And finally Group 4 was made up of the RFA tanker Orangeleaf (5927 GRT, built 1917) escorted by the auxiliary A/S trawlers HMS Arctic Ranger (Cdr.(Retd.) J.H. Young, RN) and HMS Haarlem (T/Lt. L.B. Merrick, RNR).

On leaving harbour HMS Ark Royal flew off one aircraft for A/S patrol. This patrol was maintained throughout the day.

At 1930/31, group 2 (six destroyers) were detached in position 36°25'N, 03°24'W and were ordered to proceed at economical speed to a position to the north of the Balearics where they were to rendez-vous with the remainder of the force (minus the tanker group) during the forenoon of 2 February.

1 February 1941.

At 0845/1, when in position 37°05'N, 00°32'E, groups 1 and 3 altered course to the north-east.

From 1130/1 onwards a section of fighters from HMS Ark Royal was maintained overhead until dusk.

At 1500/1 course was altered to 084°.

By 1810/1 all aircraft had returned to HMS Ark Royal.

At 1900/1, HMS Malaya escorted by HMS Encounter and HMS Jupiter were detached and ordered to rendez-vous with the remainder of 'Force H' at 0900/2 in position 40°55'N, 06°30'E. This was to economize fuel in HMS Malaya to enable to her to retreat after the bombardment of Genoa at a higher speed.

At 1910/1, HMS Renown, HMS Ark Royal, HMS Sheffield, HMS Duncan and HMS Isis, altered course to 062° and increased speed to 24 knots to arrive in the flying off position for Operation Picket.

2 February 1941.

At 0555/2, eight Swordfish were flown off from HMS Ark Royal in position 40°07'N, 06°54'E. They were armed with torpedoes to attack the dam.

At 0730/2, two more Swordfish were flown off to locate HMS Malaya and her two escorting destroyers and direct her to a rendez-vous position of 40°34'N, 06°38'E at 1000/2.

The first of seven Swordfish that returned from the raid on the dam landed on at 0830/2. The last aircraft landed on at 0848/2. One Swordfish failed to return.

The two Swordfish that had located HMS Malaya returned at 0900/2.

The striking force had encountered rain and hail showers over the land and severe icing conditions in a cloud level of 5000 feet. Ground defences were unduly alart and after the first five miles over the land, fire was encountered from Bofors and light automatic guns apparently posted along the roads leading to Tirso. throughout the final approach fire was heavy, becoming intense in the vicinity of the dam.

One aircaft becoming lost in the cloud, never located the target and finally returned to HMS Ark Royal with his torpedo. The remaining seven aircraft made individual approaches and all except one came under heavy fire. As a result of intense opposition and icing conditions in the clouds, two aircraft jettisoned their torpedoes. Of the remaining five, one was shot down, one made a high drop, nose down, two dropped approximately correctly, and one was able to take good, steady aim. No explosions were observed. The last pilot, after his attack, flew over the dam at a height of 60 feet, machine gunning the defences. He observed no damage on the south face of the dam. It is thought that if the torpedoes failed to reach the dam their run may have been stopped by a bank of silt. Information was later received from an Italian broadcast that the crew of the Swordfish that had been shot down had been taken prisoner.

The wind was by now force 6, with a rising sea, and HMS Duncan reported damage to the gun shield of 'A' gun. Visibility was moderate but improving.

At 1005/2 course was altered to 290° and eight minutes later HMS Malaya and her two escorting destroyers were sighted.

By 1115/2 HMS Malaya, HMS Encounter and HMS Jupiter had rejoined. At noon HMS Ark Royal reported that flying conditions were becoming hazardous so the A/S patrol was abandoned. Only a section of Fulmar fighters were maintained in the air as conditions were unsuitable for Skua's. At times HMS Ark Royal was dipping her flight deck into the sea. Speed had also to be reduced to 15 knots as this was the maximum speed the destroyers could proceed without sustaining damage.

At 1530/2 HMS Malaya requisted permission to turn down wind to make repairs as her cable lockers were flooding beyond the capacity of the pumps. Course was altered and speed was reduced to 10 knots at 1540/2. The original course and 15 knots speed were resumed at 1635/2.

Four Swordfish aircraft, which had been flown off to locate the six detached destroyers reported them as bearing 285°, distance 40 nautical miles at 1615/2. Course was altered to 000° at 1730/2 to ensure contact was made before dark and one hour later the destroyers joined the screen.

The northwesterly gale which had persisted all day had prevented 'Force H' from making the nesecssary ground to the west and north. Throughout the day various destroyers had reported damage at a speed of 15 knots and by the time the rendezvous with the six detached destroyers had been effected, Vice-Admiral Somerville was left with the choice of abanadoning operastion Result or making good a speed of 20 knots thoughout the night. This latter would have been impossible with the destroyers in company and problematical without them. Consideration was given to only attack Genoa with aircraft from HMS Ark Royal but in the end it was decided to abandon the operation.

3 February 1941.

At 0400/3 course was altered to 210°. The wind was still force 6, with a short sea. HMS Fearless reported at 0530/3 tht she was beginning to bump badly and speed was reduced to 13 knots.

HMS Ark Royal flew off three Swordfish at 0745/3 to seach for shipping between Cape Tortosa and Alicante up to fifty miles from the coast. A similar search was carried out in the afternoon between Cape San Antonio and Cape Palos. It was the intention to detach destroyers to close and investigate all ships reported by the aircraft but the only ship located was already in the approaches to Valencia and therefore could not be intercepted in time before it reached that port.

During the forenoon exercises were carried out during which HMS Jersey was serving as 'target'.

Course was altered to south at 1335/3 and speed was increased to 18 knots. The wind had veered to north-north-west and was still force 6. The wind eased a little towards the end of the afternoon but then increased to force 8 by 1700/3.

At 1715/3, dive bombing exercises were carried out on the fleet by four Skua's. After the first attack one aircraft force-landed in the sea on the starboard beam of the Fleet close to the destroyer screen. The crew was picked up by HMS Jupiter. The aircraft then sank.

All flying was completed by 1815/3. After dark course was reversed for twenty minutes in preparation for a night encounter exercises with HMS Jersey and HMS Jupiter which had been detached from the screen at dusk. These two destroyers, attacking from leeward, were sighted at long range. Evasion, counter-attack, star-shell and searchlights were exercised and the practice was completed by 2038/3.

4 February 1941.

A speed of 17 knots was maintained during the night and at 0100/4 course was altered to the westward. The wind remained a steady force 6 from the north-north-west.

At 0630/4, HMS Ark Royal screened by three of the destroyers hauled out of the line and they proceeded independently for flying off Swordfish aircraft for a dawn light torpedo attack on the Fleet. This attack was well delivered.

At 0800/4 speed was increased to 18 knots and HMS Sheffield took station eleven miles on the starboard beam to act as a target for gunnery exercises by HMS Renown and HMS Malaya. On completion HMS Sheffield then carried out an exercise with the leading destroyer of the screen. Finally HMS Fearless and HMS Foresight then carried out an exercise on HMS Sheffield.

By noon the sea had moderated and the wind had dropped to force 5. During the afternoon destroyers of the screen carried out exercises.

The ships of 'Force H' entered harbour at Gibraltar between 1715 and 2000 hours. (23)

6 Feb 1941

Operation Grog.

Bombardment of Genoa.

6 February 1941.

'Force H' departed Gibraltar for this operation. It was diverted into three groups, these were;

Group 1 was made up of the battlecruiser HMS Renown (Capt R.R. McGrigor, RN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral J.F. Somerville, KCB, DSO, RN), battleship HMS Malaya (Capt. A.F.E. Palliser, DSC, RN), aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal (Capt. C.S. Holland, RN) and the light cruiser HMS Sheffield (Capt. C.A.A. Larcom, RN).

Group 2 was made up of the destroyers HMS Fearless (Cdr. A.F. Pugsley, RN), HMS Firedrake (Lt.Cdr. S.H. Norris, DSO, DSC, RN), HMS Foresight (Cdr. J.S.C. Salter, RN), HMS Foxhound (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Peters, DSC, RN), HMS Fury (Lt.Cdr. T.C. Robinson, RN), HMS Encounter (Lt.Cdr. E.V.St.J. Morgan, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN).

Group 3 was made up of the destroyers HMS Duncan (A/Capt. A.D.B. James, RN), HMS Firedrake (Lt.Cdr. S.H. Norris, DSO, DSC, RN), HMS Isis (Cdr. C.S.B. Swinley, DSC, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.P. Thew, RN).

Group 2 departed Gibraltar between 1200 and 1400 hours in pairs of two. They proceeded eastwards as to be on patrol or exerising. When out of sight from land they continued on to the eastwards at economical speed to rendez-vous with groups 1 and 3 later on.

Groups 1 and 3 were clear of the harbour by 1700 hours. They then proceeded westwards as to cover convoy HG 53 which was forming up in the Strait of Gibraltar at this time.

The force was cut up into small sections and one by one they passed the Strait of Gibraltar to the eastward.

7 February 1941.

At 0300/7 all ships of groups 1 and 3 had joined company again and continued their passage eastwards.

An A/S patrol was flown off by HMS Ark Royal at 0730/7 and maintained throughout the day. Visibility was good with wind force 3 from the west. Six Skua's were flown off at 0835/7 to carry out dummy dive bombing attacks on the Fleet. Opportunity was taken to exercises all forms of AA armament.

By 1100/7 the wind had dropped to light westerly airs and there was a slight haze over the horizon which limited visibility to 10/15 miles throughout the day.

At 1155/7, in position 36°37'N, 01°21'W, HMS Firedrake investigated a contact and fired two depth charges. This contact was most likely non-sub.

All flying was completed by 1815/7. No radar contacts had been obtained all day and it seems probable that the fleet was not detected.

At 1930/7 course was altered to 035° in order to pass between Ibiza and Majorca during the dark hours.

8 February 1941.

Course was altered to 340° at 0100/8 and to 035° at 0500/8 for the passage west of the Balearics. An A/S air patrol was flown off at 0730/8 and a fighter patrol at 0930/8. These were maintained throughout the day. The six destroyers of group 2 joined at 0830/8.

During the day six aircraft were sighted but none are thought to have been enemy, almost all could be identified as being French.

During the day, a Skua and a Fulmar crashed on the deck of HMS Ark Royal when landing but no one was injured. All flying was completed by 1800 hours and ten minutes later course was altered to 090° and speed to 18 knots. At 1900/8 speed was increased to 21 knots.

At 2330/8 course was altered to the final approach course towards Genoa.

9 February 1941.

At 0400/9 HMS Ark Royal parted company escorted by HMS Duncan, HMS Encounter and HMS Isis so as the carrier could act independently to carry out air attacks on Leghorn and La Spezia.

At 0505/9, when in position 43°19'N, 08°41'E, HMS Ark Royal flew off a striking force of 14 Swordfish, followed by four Swordfish carrying magnetic mines and later by three standby spotting aircraft with an escorting section of fighters.

At 0719/9 a section of Fulmars was flown off to patrol over HMS Ark Royal.

Meanwhile the bombardment force continued on towards Genoa. At 0635/9 some unidentifiable mountain tops were just visible above the haze, silhouetted against the sky to the north-east of Rapallo, but it was not until 0649 hours that the headland of Porto Fino could be identified. It was soon seen that the Fleet was almost exactly in the position they wanted to be in.

Between 0630 and 0707 hours, HMS Sheffield and HMS Malaya catapulted their aircraft for spotting duties. HMS Renown also launched her spotting aircraft [time is not noted in the report.]

Course was altered to 290° at 0655/9 and speed was reduced to 18 knots. 13 minutes later course was altered to 270° and at 0713 back to 290°.

At 0711/9 Renown's spotting aircraft reported that no battleships were present. By 0714 hours, when fire was opened, nothing could be seen of Genoa from the ships, so the firing was carried out under direction of the spotting aircraft.

The observers in the spotting aircraft were able to indentify their targets with the greatest ease as they had been trained by using a model that had been constructed by a Commissioned Gunner of HMS Renown.

The opening salvoes from HMS Renown fell as anicipated south of Malo Principe and were quickly spotted onto the Ansaldo Works, marshalling Yards and factories on both banks of the Torrente Polcevera. Numerous explosions and considerable fires were obsevered in this area. Target was then shifted to the vicinity of the commercial basin where a big fire was caused and a merchant ship was hit. A salvo in the vicinity of the power station caused a perticularly violent explosion and an oil tank was observed to be on fire. The smoke from this and various warehouses prevented the spotting of several salvoes but a little later rounds were observed to fall in the area west of Ponte Daglio Asscreto and Ponte Caracciolo. The last salvoes fired in this area fell on the latter causing an explosion followed by a considerable fire. Target was again shifted, and the electrical works appeared to recieve a direct hit. Fire was moved up the left bank of the Torrente Polcevera and having crossed it salvoes were spotted directly on to Ansaldo Works, but smoke by then rendered observation difficult. The secondary armament engaged the area along the water front.

HMS Malaya engaged the dry docks a d targets in their vicinity throughout. Big explosions were observed in the docks and among warehouses. Several salvoes could not be spotted owing to smoke, but the last four were seen to fall among houses just north-east of the docks.

Sheffield's opening salvoes were placed short in the sea and were readily spotted. Having found range, rapid salvoes were ordered and fire was directed at the industrial installations on the left bank at the mouth of the Torrente Polcevera. Many fires and two big explosions were caused in this area. Later, as smoke was obscuring the area, fire was shifted to a tanker under way off the port and although three salvoes straddled no actual hits were observed.

The only opposition encountered by the bombarding ships was from a shore battery mounting about two 6" guns, and by the spotting aircraft from long and close range AA weapons. In both cases the fire was quite inefficient. During the bombardment two of the destroyers were ordered to make smoke to hamper gun fire from the shore battery.

The following ammunition was expended; HMS Renown 125 rounds of 15" HE and 400 rounds of 4.5" HE, HMS Malaya 148 rounds of 15" CPC and HMS Sheffield 782 rounds of 6" HE.

Whilst the main force was approaching Genoa, HMS Ark Royal's striking force of fourteen Swordfish each armed with four 250lbs. G.P. bombs and sixteen incendiaries had proceeded to attack the Azienda Oil Refinery at Leghorn. Eleven aircraft dropped their bombs on the refinery but no clear estimate could be formed of the amount of damage inflicted except that one definite explosion was observed. Surprise was evidently achieved as only one or two HA guns opened fire when the attack started. About six minutes later however, the HA fire became severe.

Two of the striking force, having mistaken their landfall, attacked alternative targets, one attacks Pisa aerodrome and the other Pisa railway junction.

One of the aircraft that attacked the refinery failed to return.

Three of the minelaying Swordfishmade a gliding approach over the town of Spezzia, two laying in the western entrance of the harbour and one in the eastern entrance. The fourth aircraft approached from the opposite direction and laid in the western entrance. There was only a partial black out of the town. Short range AA weapons of the Bofors type engaged the aircraft during their final approach and these was also some AA fire from guns round the town, but these appeared to be firing blind into the air.

Balloon barrages were noticed at Leghorn over the town and west of the Azienda Refinery along the coast and also at Genoa by the Torrente Polcevera.

By 0848 all spotting, minelaying and striking force aircraft had landed on (with the exception of the one reported missing) and HMS Ark Royal proceeded to rendez-vous with the rest of 'Force H' in position 43°48'N, 08°50'E at 0900/9. By 0919/9 the whole force was steering 180° at 22 knots.

It was evident that both the ship and air bombardment had effected complete surprise, and that no precautions had been taken by the enemy to guard against an invasion into the Gulf by 'Force H'.

Throughout the day six fighters were kept patrolling over the Fleet. At 0934/9 two aircraft were detected by RD/F bearing 060° waiting at 27 miles. Ten minutes later a Cant. flying boat was sighted low down to the north-north-east. The aircraft withdrew before the fighters could get in touch. The other aircraft also withdrew on a bearing 070°. The visibility at this time was six miles at 3000 feet and 15 miles at 15000 feet. After this the RD/F sreen remained clear until 1047 hours when a raid was detected at 40 miles closing from 070°. This turned out to be a shadower, a Cant. 506B, which was located and shot down by fighters to the north of the fleet. Course was altered to 200° at 0955/9 and to 244° at 1035/9.

At 1120/9 a raid was detected at 30 miles closing on a bearing of 350°. This raid consisted of two aircraft which appeared to be Fiat BR.20 bombers. Four bombs were dropped well astern of HMS Ark Royal and the aircraft then retired to the northward. Fighters were unable to make contact with the enemy who were at about 12000 feet.

A convoy of seven merchant vessels was encountered at noon in position 43°07'N, 08°08'E, steering 090° and HMS Foresight was detached to investigate. The convoy consisted of six French and one Turkish merchant vessels outward bound and was allowed to proceed.

A formation of aircraft was detected at 1210/9 on a bearing of 160° but it dit not close and eventually faded.

At 1300/9 the weather became very favourable to a succesful withdrawal, the visibility having decreased and the sky overcast with low cloud. A shadower was detected at 1325/9 astern of the fleet. it was located by the fighters and proved to be a Cant. Z.1007B, it was shot down at 1355/9.

Several formations were detected by RD/F to the eastward at 1412/9 but they did not close to less than about 30 miles and finally faded. At 1500/9 the fighters chased a shadower but lost him in the clouds.

Between 1615 and 1700 hours several raids were again detected to the eastward but none materialised. Thereafter the RD/F screen remained clear until 'Force H' arrived at Gibraltar.

Two aircraft were launched at 1651/9 to search for the destroyers HMS Firedrake and HMS Jupiter which had been detached to carry out a W/T diversion east of Minorca at 2345/8 to cover the approach of the force to Genoa.

Course 232°, speed 17 knots was maintained during the night.

10 February 1941.

At 0740/10 HMS Ark Royal flew off two A/S patrols and five Swordfish to carry out a search for shipping in the area between lines joining Cape San Sebastian to Minorca and Cape San Antonio to Ibiza. Five French ships and the Spanish ships were reported.

Only one ship was within range and the Spanish ship Maria (347 GRT, built 1907) was boarded (by HMS Foresight). She was bound from Barcelona to Cartagena with a general cargo and was therefore allowed to proceed.

HMS Firedrake and HMS Jupiter rejoined at 0915/10. At 1300/10 course was altered to 184°. In the afternoon four aircraft searched an area 50 miles from territorial waters between Valencia and Cartagena but only a French merchant vessel was sighted steering northwards very close to the Spanish territorial waters.

Course was altered to 222° at 1804/10 and a few minutes later HMS Ark Royal was detached with three destroyers to act independently for the remainder of the passage to Gibraltar in order to facilitate training flights. HMS Fearless and HMS Fury were detached at dusk in order to shadow the Fleet from the port quarter and to deliver a dummy attack at dawn.

11 February 1941.

Course was altered to the westward at 0230/11. At 0735/11 HMS Fearless and HMS Fury carried out an attack from the port bow, ships in the line and on the screen were using searchlights.

It had been intended to exercise dive bombing on the fleet and smoke burst target practice for destroyers but low cloud prevented this. At 1100/11 six Swordfish aircraft carried out light torpedo attacks and nine Swordfish runner attacks on the fleet. HMS Fearless and HMS Fury were again detached but now to pick up torpedoes.

On approaching the Rock a range and inclination exercise was carried out for the benefit of the shore defences, destroyers were screening the heavy ships with smoke.

'Force H' entered the harbour between 1430 and 1615 hours. (23)

12 Feb 1941
Due to a report of an enemy raider 'Force H' departed Gibraltar to proceed into the Atlantic to provide cover for convoy HG 53.

'Force H' departed Gibraltar at 1830/12 and was made up of the battlecruiser HMS Renown (Capt R.R. McGrigor, RN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral J.F. Somerville, KCB, DSO, RN), aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal (Capt. C.S. Holland, RN), light cruiser HMS Sheffield (Capt. C.A.A. Larcom, RN) and the destroyers HMS Wishart (Cdr. E.T. Cooper, RN), HMS Firedrake (Lt.Cdr. S.H. Norris, DSO, DSC, RN), HMS Foxhound (Lt.Cdr. G.H. Peters, DSC, RN), HMS Fury (Lt.Cdr. T.C. Robinson, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN).

Later that evening Vice-Admiral Somerville was informed that her was to take over the escort of troop convoy WS 6 and to make the rendez-vous he decided that he had to let go of his destroyer sceen which would be unable to keep up due to the weather conditions. The destroyers were ordered to return to Gibraltar arriving there at 0830/13. [For more info on convoy WS 6, see the event ' Convoy WS 6 ' for 9 February 1941.]

At 1130/13, HMS Sheffield parted company with HMS Renown and HMS Ark Royal to proceed to cover convoy SL(S) 64 and HG 53. (23)

17 Feb 1941
HMS Malaya (Capt. A.F.E. Palliser, DSC, RN) departed Gibraltar. She was to join convoy WS 6A that was on passage from the U.K. to Freetown. HMS Malaya was escorted out by the destroyers HMS Firedrake (Lt.Cdr. S.H. Norris, DSO, DSC, RN), HMS Foxhound (Cdr. G.H. Peters, DSC, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN).

The destroyers parted company with HMS Malaya at 2050/18 and then returned to Gibraltar arriving the following day.

[For more info on convoy WS 6A see the event ' Convoy WS 6A ' for 8 February 1941.] (24)

23 Feb 1941
Around 1930 hours (zone -1), the battleship HMS Resolution (Capt. A.R. Halfhide, CBE, RN), departed Gibraltar for Portsmouth. She was escorted by the destroyers HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN), HMS Duncan (Lt.Cdr. A.N. Rowell, RN) and HMS Velox (Lt.Cdr. E.G. Roper, DSC, RN). (25)

27 Feb 1941
Shortly after 1100 hours (zone -1), the battleship HMS Resolution (Capt. A.R. Halfhide, CBE, RN) and her destroyer escort of HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN), HMS Duncan (Lt.Cdr. A.N. Rowell, RN) and HMS Velox (Lt.Cdr. E.G. Roper, DSC, RN) made rendez-vous in approximate position 42°45'N, 16°50'W with three relief destroyers coming from Plymouth. These were HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN), HMS Kipling (Cdr. A. St. Clair-Ford, RN) and HMS Jackal (Cdr. C.L. Firth, MVO, RN). HMS Duncan and HMS Velox were then detached. (25)

3 Mar 1941
Around 1000 hours, HMS Resolution (Capt. A.R. Halfhide, CBE, RN), and her escorting destroyers, HMS Kelly (Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, GCVO, DSO, RN), HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN), HMS Kelvin (Cdr. J.H. Allison, DSO, RN), HMS Kipling (Cdr. A. St. Clair-Ford, RN), HMS Jackal (Cdr. C.L. Firth, MVO, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) and HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN), HMS Cleveland (Lt.Cdr. W.S. Clouston, RN) and HMS Tynedale (Lt.Cdr. H.E.F. Tweedie, RN) arrived at Spithead / Portsmouth.

HMS Kelly, HMS Kashmir, HMS Kelvin, HMS Kipling, HMS Jackal and HMS Jupiter departed Portsmouth for exercises off Dartmouth. They were later ordered to patrol between Ushant and Land's End. HMS Jersey was also to have sailed with them but was unable to do so due to a damaged rudder. She remained at Portsmouth for repairs which were estimated to take two weeks to complete. (26)

6 Apr 1941
The destroyers HMS Intrepid (Cdr. R.C. Gordon, DSO, RN), HMS Icarus (Lt.Cdr. C.D. Maud, DSC and Bar, RN), HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) and the escort destroyers HMS Cleveland (Lt.Cdr. W.S. Clouston, RN) and HMS Fernie (Lt.Cdr. A.H.P. Noble, RN) departed Portsmouth. They were to patrol between the longitudes of Nab Tower and Portlands Bill to the south of 50.15'N between 2000/6 and 0000/7. On completion of the patrol the destroyers were to return to Portsmouth except HMS Jersey which was to be detached so as to arrive at Plymouth at 0700/7.

7 Apr 1941
HMS Kelly (Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, GCVO, DSO, RN), HMS Kelvin (Cdr. J.H. Allison, DSO, RN), HMS Kipling (Cdr. A. St. Clair-Ford, RN) and HMS Jackal (Lt.Cdr. R.McC.P. Jonas, DSC, RN) arrived at Plymouth at 0855/7.

HMS Kelly, HMS Kelvin, HMS Kipling, HMS Jackal and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) were ordered to depart Plymouth at 1700/7 to again patrol to the west of Brest during the night.

8 Apr 1941
HMS Kelly (Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, GCVO, DSO, RN), HMS Kelvin (Cdr. J.H. Allison, DSO, RN), HMS Kipling (Cdr. A. St. Clair-Ford, RN),vHMS Jackal (Lt.Cdr. R.McC.P. Jonas, DSC, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) returned to Plymouth at 1128 hours. They had sighted nothing during their patrol west of Brest except for a large number of fishing vessels off Ushant.

9 Apr 1941
At 1641 hours, HMS Kelly (Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, GCVO, DSO, RN), HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN), HMS Kelvin (Cdr. J.H. Allison, DSO, RN), HMS Kipling (Cdr. A. St. Clair-Ford, RN), HMS Jackal (Lt.Cdr. R.McC.P. Jonas, DSC, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) are ordered to depart Plymouth and try to intercept a large German transport ship and three escorts off Les Casquests (west of Alderney Island). If they were not in contact with the enemy by 0300/10 they were to return to Plymouth.

10 Apr 1941
HMS Kelly (Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, GCVO, DSO, RN), HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN), HMS Kelvin (Cdr. J.H. Allison, DSO, RN), HMS Kipling (Cdr. A. St. Clair-Ford, RN),HMS Jackal (Lt.Cdr. R.McC.P. Jonas, DSC, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) returned to Plymouth having sighted nothing.

HMS Kelly and HMS Kelvin were then taken in hand at the Devonport Dockyard for repairs. HMS Kelvin also had a docking.

19 Apr 1941
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) departed Plymouth. [No further details available for the moment.] (27)

20 Apr 1941
HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) returned to Plymouth. [No further details available for the moment.] (27)

21 Apr 1941
HMS Kelly (Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, GCVO, DSO, RN), HMS Kelvin (Cdr. J.H. Allison, DSO, RN), HMS Kipling (Cdr. A. St. Clair-Ford, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) departed Plymouth for Gibraltar.

24 Apr 1941
HMS Kelly (Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, GCVO, DSO, RN), HMS Kelvin (Cdr. J.H. Allison, DSO, RN), HMS Kipling (Cdr. A. St. Clair-Ford, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) arrived at Gibraltar.

24 Apr 1941

Operations Dunlop and Salient.


Transfer of fighter aircraft to Malta and reinforcements for the Mediterranean Fleet.

Timespan: 24 to 28 April 1941.

24 April 1941.

At 2200/25, ‘Force S’, made up of the light cruiser HMS Dido (Capt. H.W.U. McCall, RN, Senior Officer), fast minelayer HMS Abdiel (Capt. Hon. E. Pleydell-Bouverie, MVO, RN), destroyers HMS Kelly (Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, GCVO, DSO, RN), HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN), HMS Kelvin (Cdr. J.H. Allison, DSO, RN), HMS Kipling (Cdr. A. St. Clair-Ford, RN), HMS Jackal (Lt.Cdr. R.McC.P. Jonas, DSC, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) departed Gibraltar westwards but they soon turned eastwards again to pass Gibraltar eastwards after dark. The ships also had on board stores for Malta. Most of these on HMS Dido and HMS Abdiel.

They were followed one hour later, at 2300/25, by ‘Force H’. They departed Gibraltar and immediately turned eastwards. ‘Force H’ for this occasion was made up of the battlecruiser HMS Renown (Capt. R.R. McGrigor, RN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral J.F. Somerville, KCB, DSO, RN), aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal (Capt. L.E.H. Maund, RN), light cruiser HMS Sheffield (Capt. C.A.A. Larcom, RN) and the destroyers HMS Faulknor (Capt. A.F. de Salis, RN), HMS Fearless (Cdr. A.F. Pugsley, RN), HMS Forester (Lt.Cdr. E.B. Tancock, DSC and Bar, RN), HMS Fortune (Lt.Cdr. E.N. Sinclair, RN) and HMS Fury (Lt.Cdr. T.C. Robinson, RN).

25 April 1941.

On 26 April 1941 both forces proceeded to the east independently. At 2050 hours ‘Force H’ altered course and increased speed to reach the flying off position for the Hurricanes for Malta. They were to reach approximate position 37°40’N, 06°10’E at dawn the next day.

At 2120 hours a signal was received from Malta reporting that the weather was unsuitable and that the flying off had to be postponed for 24 hours. Speed was then reduced and at 2300 hours ‘Force H’ altered course to the westwards for an area to the south-west of Ibiza.

26 April 1941.

In the morning weather reports came in from Malta which were favourable. ‘Force H’ then altered course to 220° and at 1100 hours course was altered to the north-east. The object was to remain unsighted throughout the day. This was successful due to the poor visibility. Two more favourable weather reports came from Malta throughout the day.

In the evening a signal was received from HMS Dido stating that ‘Force S’ had also postponed their passage to Malta by 24 hours.

At 2100 hours ‘Force H’ was in position 38°35’N, 02°14’E. They then altered course to 106° and increased speed to 24 knots to again reach the flying off position for the Hurricanes at dawn.

27 April 1941.

Two more favourable weather reports were received during the early hours of the night. Weather in ‘Force H’ position was however not so good and at 0445 hours, in position 37°40’N, 05°55’E the destroyers had to be detached as they had difficulty keeping up with the other ships in the rising sea.

Flying off started at 0515 hours and was completed at 0613 hours. A total of 23 Hurricanes were flown off in two batches of eight and one of seven. These were all led by a Fulmar. On completion of flying off the Hurricanes an A/S patrol was launched as well as some Fulmars for fighter protection while the ships retired to the northwest on course 300° at 27 knots.

Though visibility was poor, a lone Heinkel appeared from the clouds over HMS Renown at 0850 hours and fire was opened on it. The enemy aircraft then made off the north-east with some of the Fulmars chasing it. The enemy was able to get back in the clouds before the Fulmars could overtake it. This aircraft reported the position, course and speed of the formation.

At 1000 hours a new section of Fulmars was flown off to relieve the others and at 1036 hours a signal was received from Malta that all the Hurricanes and their escorting Fulmars had landed safely.

At noon the destroyers rejoined and formed an A/S screen. Speed was reduced to 18 knots. ‘Force H’ remained in a position to support ‘Force S’ if needed. Aircraft for A/S and fighter protection were flown off during the day.

By 2000 hours all aircraft had returned to HMS Ark Royal and course was set to return to Gibraltar.

28 April 1941.

At dawn nine Swordfish were flown off for a practice attack on ‘Force H’. However one of the Swordfish hit the bridge of HMS Ark Royal and crashed into the sea. HMS Sheffield was able to pick up two of the three crew members. There was now sign of the air gunner and he was missing, presumed killed in the crash.

More air exercises were carried out during the day.

At 1130 hours, HMS Sheffield was detached to proceed to Gibraltar for a docking.

All ships of ‘Force H’ arrived at Gibraltar later on the day.

The ships of ‘Force S’ arrived safely at Malta on the 28th. (23)

1 May 1941
HMS Gloucester (Capt. H.A. Rowley, RN) and the 5th Destroyer Flotilla; HMS Kelly (Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, DSO, GCVO, RN), HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN), HMS Kelvin (Cdr. J.H. Allison, DSO, RN), HMS Kipling (Cdr. A. St. Clair-Ford, RN), HMS Jackal (Lt.Cdr. R.McC.P. Jonas, DSC, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) departed Malta to intercept an important Axis convoy off the Kerkenah Bank. They however could not do so and the convoy arrived safely at Tripoli.

This Axis convoy was made up of the German transports Marburg (7564 GRT, built 1928), Kybfels (7764 GRT, built 1937), Reichenfels (7744 GRT, built 1936) and the Italian transports Birmania (5305 GRT, built 1930) and Rialto (6099 GRT, built 1927). Close escort for this convoy was provided by escorted by the Italian destroyers Fulmine and Euro and the torpedo boats Canopo, Castore, Orsa and Procione.

Distant cover for this convoy was provided by two heavy cruiser from the Italian 3rd Cruiser Division; Trieste and Bolzano, the light cruiser Eugenio di Savoia (from the 7th Cruiser Division) and the destroyers Ascari, Carabiniere and Vincenzo Gioberti.

Another convoy was reported to the northward but a heavy head sea made it's interception impossible.

This convoy was probably the one made up of the German transport Tilly M. Russ (1600 GRT, built 1926), Brook (1225 GRT, built 1927), and the Italian Bainsizza (7933 GRT, built 1930), San Andrea (?) and tug Max Behrendt escorted by the torpedo-boats Generale Carlo Montanari, Clio, Centauro and Polluce and the armed merchant cruiser Ramb III, they were on passage Trapani to Tripoli. (28)

2 May 1941
HMS Gloucester (Capt. H.A. Rowley, RN) and the 5th Destroyer Flotilla; HMS Kelly (Capt. L.F.A.V.N. Mountbatten, DSO, GCVO, RN), HMS Kashmir (Cdr. H.A. King, RN), HMS Kelvin (Cdr. J.H. Allison, DSO, RN), HMS Kipling (Cdr. A. St. Clair-Ford, RN), HMS Jackal (Lt.Cdr. R.McC.P. Jonas, DSC, RN) and HMS Jersey (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Burnell-Nugent, DSC, RN) returned to Malta having failed to intercept two Axis convoys to Tripoli.

HMS Kelly, HMS Kelvin and HMS Jackal had entered the harbour. HMS Jersey was the next destroyer to enter but hit a mine and sank. HMS Gloucester, HMS Kashmir and HMS Kipling therefore were unable to enter the harbour and had to proceed to Gibraltar instead. (29)

Media links


British destroyers & frigates

Norman Friedman


The Kellys

Langtree, Christopher


Destroyers of World War Two

Whitley, M. J.

Sources

  1. ADM 53/110663
  2. ADM 53/109397
  3. ADM 53/109397 + ADM 53/110663
  4. ADM 53/109398
  5. ADM 53/109418
  6. ADM 53/109398 + ADM 199/2557
  7. ADM 187/3 + ADM 199/2557
  8. ADM 53/109406
  9. ADM 199/362
  10. ADM 53/109365
  11. ADM 53/109419 + ADM 53/109420
  12. ADM 53/109371
  13. ADM 53/109366 + ADM 53/109399
  14. ADM 199/375
  15. ADM 199/2557
  16. ADM 187/10
  17. ADM 173/16313
  18. ADM 53/112890 + ADM 199/2557 + ADM 199/2558
  19. ADM 199/372
  20. ADM 53/112671
  21. ADM 199/2558
  22. ADM 187/11 + ADM 199/2557
  23. ADM 199/656
  24. ADM 53/114599
  25. ADM 53/114985
  26. ADM 53/114986
  27. ADM 187/12 + ADM 199/2557
  28. ADM 199/413
  29. ADM 199/413 + ADM 199/414

ADM numbers indicate documents at the British National Archives at Kew, London.


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