Allied Warships

HNMS Tromp

Light cruiser of the Tromp class

NavyThe Royal Dutch Navy
TypeLight cruiser
ClassTromp 
Pennant 
Built byNederlandse Scheepsbouw Maatschappij (Amsterdam, Holland) 
Ordered 
Laid down17 Jan 1936 
Launched24 May 1937 
Commissioned18 Aug 1938 
End service10 Dec 1968 
History

Became an accomodation ship on 1 April 1955.
Sold to be broken up for scrap on 13 May 1969.

For HrMs Tromp's service career see this website (offsite link).

 

Commands listed for HNMS Tromp

Please note that we're still working on this section
and that we only list Commanding Officers for the duration of the Second World War.

CommanderFromTo
1kapitein-luitenant ter zee (Cdr.) Jan Willem Termijtelen, RNN3 Jul 193919 Jul 1941
2kapitein-luitenant ter zee (Cdr.) Jan Balthazar de Meester, RNN19 Jul 19418 Oct 1943
3kapitein-luitenant ter zee (Cdr.) Frederik Stam, RNN8 Oct 194317 Mar 1947

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Notable events involving Tromp include:


The wartime history of HrMs Tromp as given on this page was recontructed taking information from her logbooks and reports found at the Dutch National Archives at The Hague and reports found at the British National Archives at Kew, London.

The page for this ship was last updated in June 2017.

7 Aug 1939
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) was docked at Amsterdam to have both propellers changed. (1)

9 Aug 1939
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) was undocked. She then conducted trials in the North Sea. (1)

11 Aug 1939
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) was docked again for inspection of her propellers. (1)

19 Aug 1939
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Den Helder, Netherlands for the Dutch East Indies. First leg of this trip was to Cadiz, Spain.

For the daily positions during the complete passage from Den Helder, Netherlands to Surabaya, Dutch East Indies, see the map below.

(1)

23 Aug 1939
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Cádiz, Spain. (1)

24 Aug 1939
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) depated Cádiz, Spain for Port Said, Egypt. (1)

29 Aug 1939
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Port Said. She transited the Suez Canal and arrived at Suez later the same day. (1)

30 Aug 1939
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Suez for Aden. (1)

1 Sep 1939
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Aden. (1)

2 Sep 1939
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Aden for Sabang, Dutch East Indies. (1)

10 Sep 1939
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Sabang, Dutch East Indies. After fuelling she daparted later the same day for Batavia via Emmahaven making a neutrality patrol along the west coast of Sumatra. (1)

12 Sep 1939
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Emmahaven (Padang), Sumatra, Dutch East Indies where she inspected the German merchant ships Franken (7789 GRT, built 1926) and Soneck (2191 GRT, built 1938) that had taken refuge there. (1)

14 Sep 1939
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Emmahaven for Batavia. (1)

16 Sep 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) briefly anchored off Bengkulen (Bengkulu), Sumatra, Dutch East Indies before proceeding towards Tjilatjap (Cilacap), Java, Netherlands East Indies. (1)

17 Sep 1939
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) anchored off Ambon.

18 Sep 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) briefly anchored off Tjilatjap (Cilacap), Java, Netherlands East Indies before proceeding towards Batavia (Jakarta). (1)

19 Sep 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Batavia (Jakarta), Java, Netherlands East Indies. (1)

20 Sep 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Batavia for Surabaya, Java, Netherlands East Indies. (1)

22 Sep 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Surabaya. (1)

23 Sep 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) is docked at Surabaya. (1)

24 Sep 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) is undocked. (1)

9 Oct 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for exercises in Madoera Strait. (2)

13 Oct 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (2)

16 Oct 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for exercises in Madoera Strait. (2)

20 Oct 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (2)

23 Oct 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) joins the Dutch East Indies Squadron. (2)

24 Oct 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for exercises in Madoera Strait. (2)

27 Oct 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (2)

1 Nov 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) conducted gunnery exercises off Surabaya. (2)

6 Nov 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for the Riouw (Riau) Archipaligo.

For the daily positions during the period of 6 November 1939 to 15 December 1939, see the map below.

(2)

8 Nov 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) anchored off Billiton Island (Pulau Belitung). (2)

9 Nov 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) continued her passage. (2)

10 Nov 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) anchored off Singkep Island (Pulau Singkep). (2)

11 Nov 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) shifted from Singkep Island (Pulau Singkep) to Lingga Island (Pulau Lingga). (2)

12 Nov 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) shifted from Lingga Island (Pulau Lingga) to Batam Island (Pulau Batam). (2)

16 Nov 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Batam Island (Pulau Batam) for the Anambas Islands. (2)

18 Nov 1939
After a short trip to the Anambas Islands, HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN), arrived at Tandjung Pinang, Bintan Island (Pulau Bintan). (2)

19 Nov 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Tandjung Pinang, Bintan Island (Pulau Bintan) for Tandjung Pandan, Banka Island (Pulau Banka). (2)

21 Nov 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) anchored off Tandjung Pandan, Banka Island (Pulau Banka). (2)

23 Nov 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) conducted exercises in the Gaspar Strait before returning to Tandjung Pandan, Banka Island (Pulau Banka). (2)

24 Nov 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) conducted exercises in the Gaspar Strait before returning to Tandjung Pandan, Banka Island (Pulau Banka). (2)

25 Nov 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Tandjung Pandan, Banka Island (Pulau Banka) for Batavia, Java. (2)

27 Nov 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Batavia, Java. (2)

30 Nov 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Batavia, Java for the Gaspar Stait. (2)

3 Dec 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) anchored off Tandjung Pandan, Banka Island (Pulau Banka). (2)

6 Dec 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Tandjung Pandan, Banka Island (Pulau Banka) to patrol in the Gaspar Strait. (2)

10 Dec 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed the Gaspar Strait for the Anambas Islands. (2)

11 Dec 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) anchored off Sedanau Island (Pulau Sedanau). (2)

12 Dec 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed from Sedanau Island (Pulau Sedanau) for Batavia, Java. (2)

15 Dec 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Batavia, Java. (2)

19 Dec 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Batavia, Java to patrol in the Java Sea.

For the daily positions during the period of 19 December 1939 to 24 December 1939, see the map below.

(2)

24 Dec 1939
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Surabaya, Java. (2)

2 Jan 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) is docked at Surabaya. (2)

8 Jan 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) is undocked. (2)

15 Jan 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for exercises in Madoera Strait. (2)

19 Jan 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (2)

22 Jan 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for exercises in Madoera Strait. (2)

26 Jan 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (2)

29 Jan 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for exercises in Madoera Strait. (2)

2 Feb 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (2)

6 Feb 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for exercises in Madoera Strait. (2)

10 Feb 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (2)

13 Feb 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for exercises in Madoera Strait. (2)

16 Feb 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (2)

20 Feb 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for exercises in Madoera Strait. (2)

24 Feb 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (2)

4 Mar 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for Oleh Leh (Banda Atjeh), Sumatra.

For the daily positions during the passage to Oleh Leh, see the map below.

(2)

8 Mar 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Oleh Leh (Banda Atjeh), Sumatra. (2)

12 Mar 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Oleh Leh (Banda Atjeh) to patrol along the west coast of Sumatra.

For the daily positions during the period of 12 March 1940 to 21 March 1940, see the map below.

(2)

13 Mar 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Meulaboh, Sumatra. (2)

15 Mar 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Meulaboh to continue her patrol along the west coast of Sumatra. (2)

17 Mar 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) anchored off Musala Island (Pulau Musala). (2)

18 Mar 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Musala Island (Pulau Musala) for Surabaya, Java. (3)

21 Mar 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Surabaya where a refit period of about 8 weeks was commenced. (3)

6 May 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) was docked at Surabaya. (3)

9 May 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) was undocked. (3)

14 May 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya to patrol in the Java Sea.

For the daily positions during the period of 14 May 1940 to 20 May 1940, see the map below.

(3)

20 May 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Surabaya. She was docked later the same day. (3)

21 May 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) was undocked. She departed Surabaya later the same day to patrol in the Java Sea. (3)

25 May 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) conducted exercises in Strait Madoera with the destroyers HrMs Witte de With (?) and HrMs Evertsen (Lt.Cdr. A. Kroese, RNN). (3)

26 May 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (3)

29 May 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for exercises in Madoera Strait. (3)

1 Jun 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (3)

3 Jun 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for exercises in Madoera Strait and the Indian Ocean. (3)

8 Jun 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (3)

10 Jun 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for exercises in Madoera Strait and the Java Sea. (3)

13 Jun 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (3)

14 Jun 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for the Java Sea. She returned to Surabaya later the same day. (3)

18 Jun 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for exercises in the Java Sea. (3)

24 Jun 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) anchored off Kangean Island. (3)

25 Jun 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Kangean Island for exercises in Madoera Strait. (3)

28 Jun 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (3)

15 Jul 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for exercises in Madoera Strait. (3)

18 Jul 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) shifted from the Madoera Strait to the Java Sea. (3)

22 Jul 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) shifted the Java Sea to the Madoera Strait. (3)

26 Jul 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (3)

30 Jul 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) conducted exercises in the Java Sea near Surabaya. Upon completion of the exercises she returned to Surabaya. (3)

12 Aug 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for Makassar and to patrol the Java Sea along the way.

For the daily positions during the period of 12 August 1940 to 19 August 1940, see the map below.

(3)

16 Aug 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Makassar. (3)

17 Aug 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Makassar for Surabaya. (3)

19 Aug 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Surabaya. (3)

21 Aug 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for Batavia (Jakarta). (3)

22 Aug 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Batavia (Jakarta). (3)

24 Aug 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Batavia (Jakarta) for Belawan, Sumatra.

For the daily positions during the period of 24 August 1940 to 29 August 1940, see the map below.

(3)

27 Aug 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived off Belawan, Sumatra. After a few hours she set course to return to Batavia (Jakarta), Java. (3)

29 Aug 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Batavia (Jakarta), Java. (3)

3 Sep 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Batavia (Jakarta), Java to conduct exercises in the Java Sea with the Dutch East Indies Squadron.

For the daily positions during the period of 3 September 1940 to 8 September 1940, see the map below.

(3)

8 Sep 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Surabaya for a maintenance period / refit. (3)

11 Oct 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) was docked at Surabaya. (3)

12 Oct 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) was undocked. (3)

21 Oct 1940
With her refit completed, HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN), departed Surabaya for trials and exercises in the Java Sea.

For the daily positions during the period of 21 October 1940 to 30 October 1940, see the map below.

(3)

30 Oct 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (3)

4 Nov 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for Pulau Saparua (near Ambon).

For the daily positions during the period of 4 November 1940 to 8 November 1940, see the map below.

(3)

8 Nov 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) dropped anchor off Pulau Saparua (near Ambon). (3)

11 Nov 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Pulau Saparua (near Ambon) to patrol in Strait Karimata.

For the daily positions during the period of 11 November 1940 to 29 November 1940, see the map below.

(3)

23 Nov 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) dropped anchor in the Gulf of Sukadana (in west Borneo, near Strait Karimata). (3)

27 Nov 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed the Gulf of Sukadana (in west Borneo, near Strait Karimata) for Batavia (Jakarta), Java. (3)

29 Nov 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Batavia (Jakarta), Java. (3)

3 Dec 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Batavia (Jakarta), Java for exercises in the Java Sea.

For the daily positions during the period of 3 December 1940 to 6 December 1940, see the map below.

(3)

9 Dec 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Cheribon (Cirebon), Java to patrol in Strait Karimata.

For the daily positions during the period of 9 December 1940 to 1 January 1941, see the map below.

(3)

12 Dec 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed the Strait Karimata area for Ambon, Moluccas. (3)

15 Dec 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Ambon, Moluccas. She departed later the same day for Mapia Island (Pulau Mapia), north of New Guinea. (3)

18 Dec 1940
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived off Mapia Island (Pulau Mapia), north of New Guinea. There she made rendez-vous with the Dutch merchant vessel Madoera (9360 GRT, built 1922) which she was to escort to 00°00'N, 165°00'E. (3)

23 Dec 1940
At 1643 hours, HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN), parted company with the vessel she had been escorting, the Dutch merchant vessel Madoera, near position 00°00'N, 165°00'E. (3)

25 Dec 1940
Around 0815 hours, HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN), made rendez-vous with Dutch merchant vessel Melampus (6336 GRT, built 1924), near position 00°01'N, 163°25'E. A second Dutch merchant vessel, the Kota Radja (7166 GRT, built 1927) was not sighted as expected at the rendes-vous. (3)

1 Jan 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) and the vessel she had been escorting, the Dutch merchant vessel Melampus, arrived at Manokwari, West Papoea.

At Manokwari Tromp fuelled from the Dutch naval tanker TAN 2 (former mechant tanker Juno, 2345 GRT, built 1912) and was serviced with provisions by the tender Zuiderkruis (2200 tons, built 1923). (3)

4 Jan 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Manokwari for a rendes-vous at sea with several Dutch merchant vessel that she was to escort. (3)

6 Jan 1941
Shortly before noon, HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN), made rendes-vous with the Dutch merchant vessels Bloemfontein (10081 GRT, built 1934) and Mapia (7188 GRT, built 1923) near position 00°49'N, 130°58'E.

At 1330 hours the Dutch liner Marnix van St. Aldegonde (19355 GRT, built 1930) and the Dutch merchant Zaandam (10909 GRT, built 1938) joined the convoy.

Around 2130 hours the last two ships joined the convoy in position 00°51'N, 131°06'E. These were the Dutch merchant vessels Polyphemus (6671 GRT, built 1930) and Tabinta (8156 GRT, built 1930). (3)

14 Jan 1941
The Dutch merchant ship Bloemfontein departed the convoy, HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN), is escorting. She had an acute shortage of drinking water as the progress of the convoy was slower then expected due to engine problems of the merchant vessel Mapia which had already broken down twice halting the entire convoy. (4)

15 Jan 1941
The convoy, HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN), is escorting is dissolved. The merchant vessel Zaandam left the convoy at 1700 hours, the Marnix van St. Aldegonde at 2000 hours, the Tabinta at 2100 hours and the last two ships of the convoy, Polyphemus and Mapia left at 0200/16. (4)

19 Jan 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) made rendes-vous with naval tanker TAN 2 (former mechant tanker Juno, 2345 GRT, built 1912) at position 04°16'S, 152°27'E in the northern end of the St. George's Channel near Rabaul where she was fuelled. Tromp also took on board a sick crew member from the TAN 2. (4)

26 Jan 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived off Ambon where a sick crew member from the TAN 2 was landed. She then departed for Surabaya, Java. (4)

29 Jan 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Surabaya, Java for maintenance. (4)

6 Feb 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) was docked at Surabaya. (4)

7 Feb 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) was undocked. (4)

18 Feb 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for Ambon.

For the daily positions during the period of 18 February 1940 to 23 March 1941, see the map below.

(4)

22 Feb 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) anchored off Ambon. (4)

25 Feb 1941
After fuelling from naval tanker TAN 4 (former merchant tanker Pendopo, 5209 GRT, built 1930), HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN), departed Ambon for Port Moresby, New Guinea. (4)

2 Mar 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Port Moresby, New Guinea where she was refuelled by naval tanker TAN 4.

4 Mar 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Port Moresby, New Guinea for convoy duty.

At 1125 hours rendes-vous was made with the Dutch merchant Kota Inten (7191 GRT, built 1927) and at 1230 hours with the Dutch merchant Siantar (6995 GRT, built 1921). (4)

11 Mar 1941
Early in the evening, HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN), released both ships she was escorting. (4)

17 Mar 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Port Moresby, New Guinea where she was fuelled by naval tanker TAN 4. She departed for Surabaya later the same day. (4)

23 Mar 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Surabaya, Java for maintenance. (4)

25 Mar 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) was docked at Surabaya. (4)

28 Mar 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) was undocked. (4)

19 May 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for trials and exercises in Madoera Strait. (4)

24 May 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (4)

27 May 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Surabaya for Cairns, Australia.

For the daily positions during the period of 27 May 1941 to 7 July 1941, see the map below.

(4)

3 Jun 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Cairns, Australia from Surabaya, Java. At Cairns she was fuelled by the Dutch naval tanker TAN 4 (former merchant tanker Pendopo, 5209 GRT, built 1930), (4)

4 Jun 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Cairns with three Dutch merchant vessels she was to escort to position 22.00'S, 180.00'E. The merchant vessels were Japara (9365 GRT, built 1939), Noesa Niwi (6737 GRT, built 1936, former German Wuppertal taken on 10 May 1940 at Padang) and Tosari (7029 GRT, built 1919). (4)

11 Jun 1941
At 1600 hours the convoy HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) had been escorting was disbanded. (4)

14 Jun 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) commenced patrolling along the route the Dutch merchant ships Sloterdijk (9230 GRT, built 1940) and Tabian (8151 GRT, built 1930) were following. (4)

15 Jun 1941
At 1345 hours, HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN), commenced escorting the Tabian. (4)

16 Jun 1941
At 1545 hours, HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN), stopped escorting the Tabian. Tromp now set course for Suva while the Tabian continued on her way. (4)

17 Jun 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Suva where she was fuelled by the Dutch naval tanker TAN 4. (4)

20 Jun 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Suva for Brisbane, Australia. She was tasked with escorting the Dutch merchant vessels Poelau Tello (9272 GRT, built 1929) and Talisse (8169 GRT, built 1930). (4)

26 Jun 1941
At daybreak, HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN), disbanded the convoy she was escorting and proceeded to Brisbane where she arrived later the same day and was fuelled yet again by the Dutch naval tanker TAN 4. (4)

29 Jun 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) departed Brisbane for Cairns. (4)

1 Jul 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived off Cairns where she went alongside the TAN 4 to be topped off with fuel. She departed later the same day for Surabaya, Java. (4)

7 Jul 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Surabaya, Java. (4)

10 Jul 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) was docked at Surabaya. (4)

11 Jul 1941
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) was undocked. (4)

21 Jul 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Surabaya for exercises in Madoera Strait. (4)

25 Jul 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (4)

29 Jul 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Surabaya for exercises in Madoera Strait and the Java Sea. (4)

1 Aug 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (4)

6 Aug 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Surabaya for exercises in Madoera Strait. (4)

9 Aug 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (4)

12 Aug 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Surabaya for exercises in the Java Sea and Madoera Strait. (4)

16 Aug 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (4)

21 Aug 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted exercises in Madoera Strait. She returned to Surabaya upon completion of these exercises. (4)

25 Aug 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Surabaya for Batavia. (4)

27 Aug 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Batavia from Surabaya. (4)

2 Sep 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Batavia for Ambon.

For the daily positions during the period of 2 September 1941 to 20 September 1941, see the map below.

(4)

6 Sep 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Ambon from Batavia. (4)

9 Sep 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Ambon for a short patrol to the north Moluccas. (4)

12 Sep 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) anchored off Ambon where she was fuelled by the Dutch naval tanker TAN 8 (2770 GRT, built 1927, former merchant tanker Petronella). She then proceeded to sea again. (4)

13 Sep 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) anchored off Naira Island (Pulau Naira), Banda Islands. (4)

16 Sep 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Naira Island (Pulau Naira) for Ambon. (4)

17 Sep 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) briefly anchored off Ambon before she departed for Surabaya later the same day. (4)

20 Sep 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Surabaya. (4)

23 Sep 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) commenced a refit at Surabaya. (4)

24 Oct 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) was docked at Surabaya. (4)

27 Oct 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) was undocked. (4)

29 Oct 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) was docked again at Surabaya. (5)

31 Oct 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) was undocked. (5)

6 Nov 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Surabaya for trials and exercises in the Java Sea. (5)

8 Nov 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Surabaya. (5)

9 Nov 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Surabaya for Batavia. (5)

10 Nov 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Batavia. (5)

12 Nov 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Batavia to patrol in the Sunda Strait. This was done to prevent the Vichy-French from transporting rubber for the Germans from Indo-China to France. Their ships were now mostly in convoy when they passed the Sunda Strait and some 'fire power' was needed to bolster the Sunda Strait patrol.

For the daily positions during the period of 12 November 1941 to 1 December 1941, see the map below.

(5)

19 Nov 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Batavia for fuel and stores. (5)

20 Nov 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Batavia to resume her patrol in the Sunda Strait. (5)

25 Nov 1941
In the early morning hours, HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN), is ordered to proceed to Batavia for fuel and stores and then to proceed into the Indian Ocean along the route to Fremantle, Australia to search for the missing Australian light cruiser HMAS Sydney.

She departed Batavia later the same day for the Indian Ocean. (5)

27 Nov 1941
After dawn, HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN), had launched her aircraft for a search. When the aircraft returned it was damaged while landing in the rough seas. It was taken on board but was beyond repair by the ships crew. (5)

1 Dec 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Surabaya. (5)

2 Dec 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Surabaya to patrol in the Gaspar and Karimata Straits together with the submarines HrMs K IX (Lt.Cdr. P.G. de Back, RNN), HrMs K XI (Lt.Cdr. A.H. Deketh, RNN), HrMs K XII (Lt.Cdr. H.C.J. Coumou, RNN(R)) and HrMs K XIII (Lt.Cdr. M.A.J. Derksema, RNN) (this was the 2nd Dutch submarine division).

For the daily positions during the period of 2 December 1941 to 9 December 1941, see the map below.

(5)

8 Dec 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) is on patrol to the north of Stait Karimata when she received a signal that war had broken out with Japan. Course was then set to return to Surabaya. (5)

9 Dec 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived back at Surabaya.

At 2100 hours HrMs Tromp departed Surabaya for Strait Sapé (the strait between Sumbawa and Flores Islands).

For the daily positions during the period of 9 December 1941 to 23 December 1941, see the map below.

(6)

10 Dec 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) was fuelled by the Dutch naval tanker TAN 8 (2770 GRT, built 1927, former merchant tanker Petronella) north of Pulau Panjang in the northern end of the Lombok Strait. (6)

11 Dec 1941
In the morning, HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN), joined the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) that were already patrolling Sape Stait.

Ater fuelling from naval tanker TAN 2, HrMs Tromp, together with HrMS Banckert, while HrMS Piet Hein had already gone ahead, proceeded at high speed towards the Java Sea as a Japanese aircraft carrier was reported in the Java Sea. Early the next morning a signal was received that the report was false (The carrier was in fact an American merchant vessel with two tugs). Course was then reversed to return to Strait Sape. (6)

13 Dec 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the two destroyers were ordered to return to Surabaya. (6)

14 Dec 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) was ordered to return to Surabaya where she arrived later the same day. (6)

15 Dec 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Surabaya for the Java Sea where at 1213 hours she made rendes-vous with HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN).

Course was then set for the Kumai Bay, south Borneo where the ships anchored late on this day and all Commending Officers went to the flagship for a breefing. With the breefing over the ships departed Kumai Bay at 0830/16 for Strait Karimata. (6)

18 Dec 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN). anchored in the Sampit Bay, south Borneo. HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN) had already left the formation at 1600 hours the previous day to return to Surabaya for repairs.

In the afternoon destroyer Piet Hein went alongside and fuelled from the Tromp.

Early the next day Tromp and destroyer Banckert fuelled from the tanker TAN 3 (3126 GRT, built 1928, former merchant tanker Djirak). (6)

19 Dec 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) departed Sampit Bay, south Borneo to patrol to the south of Borneo. (6)

21 Dec 1941
Late in the morning, HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN). anchored off the coast of south Borneo to the west of Sampit Bay. (6)

22 Dec 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) returned to Surabaya where they arrived late in the afternoon. (6)

22 Dec 1941

Convoy BM 9B.

This convoy departed Bombay on 22 December 1941.

It was made up of the following (troop) transports; El Madina (British, 3962 GRT, built 1937), Jalarajan (British, 5076 GRT, built 1925), Rajput (British, 5521 GRT, built 1925), Risaldar (British, 5407 GRT, built 1940) and Talma (British, 10000 GRT, built 1923).

On departure from Bombay it was escorted by the Greek armoured cruiser RHS Georgios Averoff.

Around 1530EF/26, the light cruiser HMS Glasgow (Cdr. J.W. Cuthbert, RN) departed Colombo with the transport Madura (British, 8975 GRT, built 1921). They joined the convoy around 0730EF/27 in position 04°38'N, 80°40'E. The Georgios Averoff then parted company to proceed to Colombo. The transport Talma had apparently parted company on the 26th to proceed to Colombo.

Around 1415G/31, HMS Glasgow was relieved in position 00°27'S, 94°51'E by the light cruisers HMS Danae (Capt. F.J. Butler, MBE, RN) and HrMs Java (Capt. P.B.M van Straelen, RNN).

Around 1230GH/3, the destroyers HMS Electra (Cdr. C.W. May, RN), HMS Express (Lt.Cdr. F.J. Cartwright, RN) and HMS Stronghold (Lt.Cdr.(Retd.) G.R. Pretor-Pinney, RN) joined in approximate position 06°27'S, 103°00'E.

Around 0700GH/4, HrMs Java and the transport Madura parted company to proceed to Batavia.

Around 1200GH/4, the light cruisers HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN), HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) joined in approximate position 05°15'S, 106°20'E. They had departed Banten Bay earlier in the day.

Around 0600GH/5, the minesweepers HMAS Burnie (T/A/Lt.Cdr. G.E. Gough, RANR(S)) and HMAS Goulburn (Lt. B. Paul, RANR(S)) joined the convoy.

Around 1200GH/5, the light cruiser HMAS Hobart (Capt. H.L. Howden, CBE, RAN) joined the convoy in Banka Strait in approximate position 02°40'S, 105°49'E.

After the passage of the Banka Strait had been completed the Dutch ships that had joined around 1200GH/4 parted company around 2000GH/5.

Around 1645GH/6, HMAS Hobart parted company with the convoy to proceed to Batavia.

The convoy arrived at Singapore around 1930GH/6.

The convoy arrived at Singapore (7)

26 Dec 1941
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Surabaya together with HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) for Batavia via Strait Bali, the south coast of Java and the Sunda Strait.

For the daily positions during the period of 26 December 1941 to 29 December 1941, see the map below.

(6)

29 Dec 1941
The task force, made up of HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN), HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN), arrived at Batavia. (6)

30 Dec 1941

Convoy DM 1

This convoy was formed at sea near Mombasa on 30 December 1941.

It arrived at Addu Atoll (Port T) on 4 January 1942 and departed from there for Singapore on 5 January 1942. The convoy arrived at Singapore on 13 January 1942.

This convoy was made up of the following ships;
American liner (troopship) Mount Vernon (24289 GRT, built 1933), British liners (troopships) Narkunda (16227 GRT, built 1920), Aorangi (17491 GRT, built 1924), British cargo vessel Sussex (11062 GRT, built 1937), Dutch passerger / cargo ship Abbekerk (7906 GRT, built 1939).

The convoy was escorted by British light cruiser HMS Emerald (Capt. F.C. Flynn, RN) until Addu Attol. From Addu Atoll onwards HMS Emerald was reinforced by the British heavy cruiser HMS Exeter (Capt. O.L. Gordon, MVO, RN) and the Indian sloop HMIS Jumna (Cdr. W.R. Shewring, RIN).

On 9 January, the British light cruiser HMS Durban (Capt. P.G.L. Cazalet, DSC, RN), joined the escort in position 04°27'N, 94°47'E.

On 10 January, the Dutch light cruiser HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN) joined the escort for three hours in position 05°22'N, 100°34'E. Rear-Admiral Doorman then boarded HMS Emerald to discuss the route and policy with the commanding officer. After Rear-Admiral Doorman returned to his flagship HrMs De Ruyter parted company with the convoy.

Later on 10 January 1940 the British destroyers HMS Encounter (Lt.Cdr. E.V.St J. Morgan, RN), HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) and the Australian destroyer HMAS Vampire (Cdr. W.T.A. Moran, RAN) joined the escort in position 05°30'S, 100°55'E.

Shortly before 1800 hours on 11 January the Dutch light cruisers HrMs De Ruyter, HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the Dutch destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) bolstered the escort of convoy DM 1. The Dutch ships remained with the convoy until 0745/13. (6)

1 Jan 1942
HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN), HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) departed Batavia. They were to bolster the escort of convoy BM 9A that was en-route to Singapore. The Dutch ships joined the British convoy at 1345 hours.

The Dutch ships remained with the convoy until 2000/2.

Convoy BM 9A was made up of the following ships; liner (troopship) Devonshire (11275 GRT, built 1939), passenger (or in this case troops) / cargo ships Lancashire (9445 GRT, built 1917), Rajula (8478 GRT, built 1926), Ethiopia (5575 GRT, built 1922) and Varsova (4691 GRT, built 1914). They were escorted by the Australian light cruiser HMAS Hobart (Capt. H.L. Howden, CBE, RAN), the British light cruisers HMS Durban (Capt. P.G.L. Cazalet, DSC, RN), HMS Dragon (Capt. R.J. Shaw, MBE, RN) and the British destroyers HMS Encounter (Lt.Cdr. E.V.St J. Morgan, RN), HMS Jupiter (Lt.Cdr. N.V.J.T. Thew, RN) and the Australian destroyer HMAS Vampire (Cdr. W.T.A. Moran, RAN). The convoy arrived arrived at Singapore on 3 January. (6)

1 Jan 1942

For the daily positions during the period of 1 January 1942 to 14 January 1942, see the map below.

3 Jan 1942
HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN), HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) arrived at Banten Bay (to the west of Batavia). (6)

4 Jan 1942
HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN), HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) departed Banten Bay to bolster the escort of convoy BM 9B that was en-route to Singapore. The Dutch ships joined the British convoy around 1200GH/4.

The Dutch ships remained with the convoy until 2000/5.

[For more info on this convoy see the event ' Convoy BM 9B ' for 22 December 1941.] (6)

7 Jan 1942
After having released convoy BM 9B at 2000/5 HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN), HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) returned to the Sunda Strait, passed it and proceeded on a sweep into the Indian Ocean towards Pulau Enggano. After reaching Enggano around 0700 hours on this day course was reversed to return towards the Sunda Strait. (6)

8 Jan 1942
HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN), HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) put into the Keizersbay (near Lampung), southern Sumatra where they were fuelled by the naval tanker TAN 8 (2770 GRT, built 1927, former merchant tanker Petronella). Later the same day the task force departed for the Indian Ocean. (6)

8 Jan 1942

Convoy BM 10.

Convoy from Bombay to Singapore.
Departure date: 8 January 1942.
Arrival date: 25 January 1942.

This convoy was initially made up of the following ships;
British passenger / cargo ships Talthybius (10224 GRT, built 1912), Rohna (8602 GRT, built 1926), Cap St. Jaques (8009 GRT, built 1922), Takliwa (7936 GRT, built 1924), Islami (5879 GRT, built 1934), Ekma (5128 GRT, built 1911), British cargo ships Subadar (5424 GRT, built 1929), Jalavihar (5330 GRT, built 1911), Ekma (5128 GRT, built 1911), Jalakrishna (4991 GRT, built 1937), Loch Ranza (4958 GRT, built 1934) and Brittany (4772 GRT, built 1928)

Escort was initially provided from 8 January to 13 January 1942 by the British light cruiser HMS Caledon (A/Capt. H.J. Haynes, DSO, DSC, RN).

On 13 January 1942, the British light cruisers HMS Enterprise (Capt. J.C. Annesley, DSO, RN) and HMS Glasgow (Capt. H. Hickling, DSO, RN) took over from HMS Caledon in position 05°41'N, 80°00'E. They had come from Colombo escorting the British transports Jalaratna (3865 GRT, built 1930) and Silverlarch (5122 GRT, built 1924) which joined the convoy.

On 14 January 1942, the Indian sloop HMIS Sutlej (Capt. P.A. Mare, RIN) joined the convoy in position 03°52'N, 83°20'E coming from Trincomalee.

On 18 January 1942, the British heavy cruiser HMS Exeter (Capt. O.L. Gordon, MVO, RN) and the British light cruiser HMS Danae (Capt. F.J. Butler, MBE, RN) joined the convoy in position 00°41'S, 95°14'E. HMS Glasgow was detached and returned to Colombo.

On 20 January 1942, the British destroyers HMS Electra (Cdr. C.W. May, RN), HMS Stronghold (Lt.Cdr.(Retd.) G.R. Pretor-Pinney, RN) and the Australian sloop HMAS Yarra (Cdr. W.H. Harrington, RAN) joined the convoy in position 05°00'S, 100°57'E.

On 22 January 1942, the convoy passed through the Sunda Strait. Early in the morning of that day the Dutch light cruiser HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the Dutch destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) departed Batavia (Jakarta), Java, Netherlands East Indies, escorting the US cargo ship Collingsworth (5101 GRT, built 1920) and the Dutch passenger / cargo ship Rochussen (2680 GRT, built 1904). These ships joined the convoy around 1100 hours. When the Dutch escorts joined the destroyers HMS Electra and HMS Stronghold left the convoy and proceeded to Batavia. Two more merchant ships joined the convoy on this day, these were the British Yuen Sang (3229 GRT, built 1923) and the Norwegian Hermelin (1683 GRT, built 1940).

On 24 January 1942, HMS Exeter parted company and proceeded to Batavia. Later the Dutch ships also parted company.

On 25 January 1942, the convoy and escort arrived at Singapore at dawn. (6)

9 Jan 1942
At 1930 hours, HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) are ordered by Rear Admiral Doorman aboard HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN) to proceed towards Pisang Island (Pulau Pisang) on the south-west coast of Sumatra where they were to refuel. (6)

10 Jan 1942
Shortly after 1030 hours, HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) dropped anchor off Pisang Island (Pulau Pisang). There they were fuelled by the Dutch naval tanker TAN 8 (2770 GRT, built 1927, former merchant tanker Petronella). The three Dutch warships departed around 2300 hours to rejoin HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN) in the Indian Ocean which they did at 0645/11. (6)

14 Jan 1942
HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN), HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) arrive at Batavia (Jakarta), Java. (6)

19 Jan 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) depart Batavia (Jakarta), Java to escort the Dutch passenger / cargo ships Poelau Tello (9272 GRT, built 1929) and cargo ship Straat Malakka (6439 GRT, built 1939) through the Sunda Strait into the Indian Ocean.

Duning the night of 19/20 January, in a very dark night with heavy rain, contact was lost with the destroyer Banckert.

At 1700/20 the convoy was disbanded and HrMS Tromp and HrMs Piet Hein set course to return to Batavia.

At 0030/21, and again in heavy rain, Tromp lost contact with the Piet Hein as well. Borth ships re-joined company arond 0600 hours that morning. They then arrived at Batavia at 1100/21. (6)

22 Jan 1942

For the daily positions of HrMs Tromp during the period of 22 January 1942 to 28 January 1942, see the map below.

(6)

25 Jan 1942
Early in the morning HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) departed the escort of convoy BM 10 and proceeded to Pladjoe (Pladju, Palembang) to refuel. They arrived at Pladjoe (Pladju) to refuel at 1800 hours. (6)

26 Jan 1942
At 1130 hours, HMS Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) departed the Pladjoe (Pladju, Palembang) for Batavia (Jakarta), Java. (6)

27 Jan 1942
While en-route to Batavia (Jakarta), Java from Pladjoe (Pladju, Palembang, Sumatra), HMS Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) are ordered, at 0330 hours, to proceed at high speed towards a position 60 nautical miles to the north-west of Strait Karimata as a convoy of 16 Japanese ships is reported to be heading south in that direction. HrMs Java (Capt. P.B.M van Straelen, RNN), who is also in the area is also ordered to proceed to that position.

At 1430 hours this order is cancelled and Tromp and her two escorting destroyers are ordered to proceed to Surabaya, Java. (6)

28 Jan 1942
At 1500 hours, HMS Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN), arrive at Surabaya, Java. (6)

29 Jan 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) was docked at Surabaya. (6)

31 Jan 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) was undocked. (6)

3 Feb 1942
After a short maintenance period, HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN), departed Surabaya for Strait Madoera around 1300 hours. At 1835 hours she dropped anchor north of Gili Raja Island (Pulau Gili Raja) near HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN). Cdr. de Meester then went aboard the flagship for a conferance with the Squadron Commander Rear-Admiral Doorman with the Commanding Officers of all ships present.

For the daily positions during the period of 3 February 1942 to 8 February 1942, see the map below.

(6)

4 Feb 1942
At 0130 hours, the Dutch light cruisers HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN), HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the Dutch destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN), HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) and HrMs Van Ghent (Lt.Cdr. P. Schotel, RNN) departed their anchorage to the north of of Gili Raja Island (Pulau Gili Raja) for the Java Sea.

At 0500 hours they made rendes-vous with the US heavy cruiser USS Houston (Capt. A.H. Rooks, USN), the US light cruiser USS Marblehead (Capt. A.G. Robinson, USN) and their escorting destroyers USS Stewart (Lt.Cdr. H.P. Smith, USN), USS John D. Edwards (Lt.Cdr. H.E. Eccles, USN), USS Barker (Lt.Cdr. A.J. Miller, USN) and USS Bulmer (Lt.Cdr. D.A. Harris, USN). These American ships had also been anchored the north of of Gili Raja Island (Pulau Gili Raja) but had left a little earlier then the Dutch ships. The mission of the joint Dutch-US task force was a 'hit and run' raid into Strait Makassar.

Around 0955 hours the task force came under air attack in the by the Japanese in the Bali Sea in approximate position 07°28'S, 115°37'E and USS Houston and USS Marblehead were damaged. Houston was hit on the roof of her rear 8" gun turret heavily damaging it and it could not be repaired. (When USS Houston sank about four weeks later she still had only two operational 8" gun turrets). USS Marblehead was hit twice and also straddled and received serious damage resulting in that she had to be sent to the USA for repairs. The raid into Makassar Stait was now cancelled.

USS Houston had been sent towards Tjilatjap (Cilacap) on the south coast of Java for repairs. USS Tromp was later ordered to give her protection during her passage there and proceeded after her. She caught up with her to the south of Atlas Stait and both ships then proceeded in company until 0000/5 when Tromp left USS Houston again and proceeded to re-join the task force as ordered which she did at 1325/5 when she made rendes-vous with HrMs De Ruyter and the three Dutch destroyers. (6)

8 Feb 1942
HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN), HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the Dutch destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN), HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) and HrMs Van Ghent (Lt.Cdr. P. Schotel, RNN) arrive at Tjilatjap (Cilacap) on the south coast of Java.

At Tjilatjap HrMs Tromp was fuelled by the US naval oiler USS Pecos (Lt.Cdr. E.P. Abernethy, USN).

Around 1800 hours Tromp departed Tjilatjap together with HrMS De Ruyter. (6)

8 Feb 1942

For the daily positions of HrMs Tromp during the period of 8 February 1942 to 16 February 1942, see the map below.

(6)

9 Feb 1942
Around 0800 hours, HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN) and HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN), were joined by eight US destroyers USS Whipple (Lt.Cdr. E.S. Karpe, USN), USS Pillsbury (Lt.Cdr. H.C. Pound, USN), USS Edsall (Lt.Cdr. J.J. Nix, USN), USS Alden (Lt.Cdr. L.E. Coley, USN), USS Stewart (Lt.Cdr. H.P. Smith, USN), USS John D. Edwards (Lt.Cdr. H.E. Eccles, USN), USS Barker (Lt.Cdr. A.J. Miller, USN) and USS Bulmer (Lt.Cdr. D.A. Harris, USN).

At 1700 hours the Dutch destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN), HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) and HrMs Van Ghent (Lt.Cdr. P. Schotel, RNN) also joined. Van Ghent developed engine trouble and was later replaced by HrMs Kortenaer (Lt.Cdr. A. Kroese, RNN). (After repairs Van Ghent re-joined the task force on the 11th.)

Around 2130 hours the US destroyers USS Edsall and USS Alden were detached and sent to Tjilatjap. (6)

11 Feb 1942
At 1800 hours, HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN), arrived at the Prigi Bay on the south coast of Java where she was fuelled by TAN 8 (2770 GRT, built 1927, former merchant tanker Petronella). (6)

12 Feb 1942
At 0200 hours, HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN), departed the Prigi Bay on the south coast of Java. Outside the bay she waited for HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN) which had also fuelled there. While leaving the bay De Ruyter collided with the US destroyer USS Whipple (Lt.Cdr. E.S. Karpe, USN) (or it was the other way round, Whipple colliding with De Ruyter, depending on what sources one reads, Dutch or American, sic.).

At sea the Dutch cruisers made rendes-vous with the Dutch destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN), HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN), HrMs Van Ghent (Lt.Cdr. P. Schotel, RNN) and HrMs Kortenaer (Lt.Cdr. A. Kroese, RNN). The task force then set course towards the Sunda Strait.

At 1600 hours, HrMS Van Ghent and HrMs Kortenaer departed the formation and at 1830 hours HrMs Piet Hein and HrMs Bankert also left.

Both cruisers then continued their passage towards the Sunda Strait unescorted. (6)

13 Feb 1942
Around 1400 hours HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN) and HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrive in the Sunda Stait which was then entered and passed northbound. Course was then set towards the Gaspar Staits.

At 1830 hours they were joined by the third Dutch cruiser in the Dutch East Indies, HrMs Java (Capt. P.B.M van Straelen, RNN). As by now there were still no destroyers with the cruisers for an intended hit and run raid northwards the cruisers turned around and headed for Oosthaven (Bandar Lampung), Sumatra. (6)

14 Feb 1942
Around 1600 hours, an Allied task force, now made up of five cruisers; the Dutch light cruisers HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN), HrMs Java (Capt. P.B.M van Straelen, RNN), HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN), the British heavy cruiser HMS Exeter (Capt. O.L. Gordon, MVO, RN) and the Australian light cruiser HMAS Hobart (Capt. H.L. Howden, CBE, RAN). They were escorted by a total of ten destroyers, four Dutch and six American; HrMs Van Ghent (Lt.Cdr. P. Schotel, RNN), HrMs Kortenaer (Lt.Cdr. A. Kroese, RNN), HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN), HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN), USS Stewart (Lt.Cdr. H.P. Smith, USN), USS John D. Edwards (Lt.Cdr. H.E. Eccles, USN), USS Barker (Lt.Cdr. A.J. Miller, USN), USS Bulmer (Lt.Cdr. D.A. Harris, USN), USS Pillsbury (Lt.Cdr. H.C. Pound, USN) and USS Parrott (Lt.Cdr. J.N. Hughes, USN) depared Oosthaven (Bandar Lampung), Sumatra for a hit and run raid to the north of the Gaspar Straits to attack a reported Japanese convoy. (6)

15 Feb 1942
Around 0315GH/15, the Allied Striking Force entered the Stolze Strait (to the east of Mendanau Island (Pulau Mendanau). The task force was clear of the strait around 0800GH/15 but not before the Dutch destroyer HrMs Van Ghent (Lt.Cdr. P. Schotel, RNN) had hit a reef around 0500GH/15 resulting in the loss of this vessel. The Dutch destroyer HrMs Banckert (Lt.Cdr. L.J. Goslings, RNN) remained behind to render assistance to her stranded sister but it was soon apparent that the ship was beyond salvage. Several valuable items of the equipment were however taken off and by 1700 hours the wreck of HrMs Van Ghent was destroyed by HrMs Banckert. The Banckert now made off for Surabaya with the crew of the Van Ghent on board.

Meanwhile around 1150GH/15, the first Japanese air attack on the remainder of the Allied Striking Force started. The attacks, which came in five waves, lasted until about 1745GH/15. No major damage was done to the Allied ships which had reversed course shortly after 1300GH/15. The Australian light cruiser HMAS Hobart reported some minor damage, mostly from splinters and the US destroyers USS Barker (Lt.Cdr. A.J. Miller, USN) and USS Bulmer (Lt.Cdr. D.A. Harris, USN) required repairs to their badly shaken up machinery spaces due to near misses.

The task force was then split up with HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN), HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN), HMS Exeter (Capt. O.L. Gordon, MVO, RN), HMAS Hobart and the destroyers USS Barker and USS Bulmer proceeding to Batavia to refuel. HrMs Java (Capt. P.B.M van Straelen, RNN) and the remaining US destroyers (USS Stewart (Lt.Cdr. H.P. Smith, USN), USS John D. Edwards (Lt.Cdr. H.E. Eccles, USN), USS Pillsbury (Lt.Cdr. H.C. Pound, USN) and USS Parrott (Lt.Cdr. J.N. Hughes, USN)) proceeded to the Ratai Bay to refuel and the two remaining Dutch destroyers (HrMs Kortenaer (Lt.Cdr. A. Kroese, RNN) and HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN)) to Oosthaven to do the same. (6)

16 Feb 1942
Around 1000GH/16, HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN), HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN), HMS Exeter (Capt. O.L. Gordon, MVO, RN), HMAS Hobart (Capt. H.L. Howden, CBE, RAN), USS Barker (Lt.Cdr. A.J. Miller, USN) and USS Bulmer (Lt.Cdr. D.A. Harris, USN) arrived off Tandjong Priok / Batavia.

earlier that morning, around 0625GH/16 and during a heavy rain squall, HrMs De Ruyter and HMAS Hobart had narrowly avoided grounding on Krawang Point, and subsequent colliding with each other. (8)

17 Feb 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Batavia for Surabaya. (6)

18 Feb 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Surabaya from Batavia. (6)

19 Feb 1942

Battle of Badoeng Strait

It was expected that the Japanese would soon land (night of 19/20 February 1942) on the south-east coast of Bali (Badoeng Strait). Rear-Admiral Doorman therefore wanted to attack them in three waves. The first wave came from Tjilatjap on the south coast of Java and consisted of the Dutch light cruisers HrMs De Ruyter (Cdr. E.E.B. Lacomblé, RNN and flagship of Rear-Admiral K.W.F.M. Doorman, RNN) and HrMs Java (Capt. P.B.M van Straelen, RNN), escorted by the Dutch destroyers HrMs Piet Hein (Lt.Cdr. J.M.L.I. Chompff, RNN) and HrMs Kortenaer (Lt.Cdr. A. Kroese, RNN) as well as the US destroyers USS John D. Ford (Lt.Cdr. J.E. Cooper, USN) and USS Pope (Lt.Cdr. W.C. Blinn, USN). However while leaving Tjilatjap in the evening of the 18th the Dutch destroyer Kortenaer grounded and was only able to get of at high tide therefore was no longer part of this force.

The second wave was made up of the Dutch light cruiser HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and four US destroyers; USS Stewart (Lt.Cdr. H.P. Smith, USN), USS Parrott (Lt.Cdr. J.N. Hughes, USN), USS Pillsbury (Lt.Cdr. H.C. Pound, USN) and USS John D. Edwards (Lt.Cdr. H.E. Eccles, USN). They sailed from Surabaya in the afternoon of the 19th

Finally the third wave was made up of the Dutch Motor Torpedo Boats; HrMs TM-4 (Lt. J.E. Gobée, RNN), HrMs TM-5 (S.Lt. E.J. Hoeksel, RNN), HrMs TM-6 (S.Lt. P. van Rees, RNN), HrMs TM-8 (Lt. J.G. Treffers, RNN), HrMs TM-9 (Lt. J.A. van Beusekom, RNN), HrMs TM-10 (S.Lt. J.W. Boon, RNN(R)), HrMs TM-11 (S.Lt. A.A.F. Schmitz, RNN), HrMs TM-15 (Lt. H.C. Jorissen, RNN). HrMs TM-13 (?) was also part of this force but acted as 'rescue boat'. Shortly after their sailing from Surabaya in the evening of the 18th HrMs TM-6 was forced to return due to engine trouble. These Motor Torpedo Boats proceeded through Strait Bali and anchored in three bay's on the Java side to refuel which took the whole day. In the evening of the 19th they departed for Badoeng Strait.

The Japanese attack on Bali was carried out by two transport ships Sasako Maru (7180 GRT, built 1941) and Sagami Maru (7189 GRT, built 1940). They had on board part of the Imperial Japanese Army’s 48th Infantry Division and had departed Makassar for Bali during the night of 17/18 February. They were escorted by four destroyers; Asashio (Lt.Cdr. G. Yoshii), Oshio (Cdr. K. Kikkawa) Arashio (Cdr. H. Kuboki) and Michishio (Lt.Cdr. M. Ogura). Distant cover was provided by the light cruiser Nagara (Capt T. Naoi, flagship of Rear-Admiral K. Kubo) escorted by three destroyers Hatsushimo (Lt.Cdr. S. Kohama), Nenohi (Lt.Cdr. T. Chihagi) and Wakaba (Lt.Cdr. M. Kuroki).

The Japanese landed around 0200/19 on the south coast of Bali. The transports were attacked unsuccessfully by the American submarine USS Seawolf. Seawolf herself was then counter attacked with depth charges by the destroyers but managed to escape.

During the day the Japanese transports were attacked from the air and the Sagami Maru was damaged. She left the landing zone escorted by the destroyers Arashio and Michishio. The undamaged Sasako Maru remained in the landing zone to pick up the landing barges. The destroyers Asashio and Oshio remained with her.

The allied first attack wave arrived south of Bali around 2130/19. A line was then formed in the order, HrMs De Ruyter, HrMs Java, HrMs Piet Hein, USS John D. Ford and finally USS Pope. Speed was increaded to 27 knots and they proceeded up Badoeng Strait. Around 2230 hours HrMs De Ruyter and HrMs Java opened fire on the Japanese which were taken by surprise. The Asashio turned a searchlight on which was quickly taken out by a salvo from the Java. The Dutch cruisers claimed heavy damage on the enemy but according to Japanese reports on the battle damage was only minor and after being initially taken by surprise the Japanese soon counter attacked. By that time however the Dutch cruisers had moved on.

The Allied destroyers were further behind the cruisers then intended and now arrived on the scene. Piet Hein was a little ahead of the US destroyers and opened fire with her 4.7” guns and also fired two torpedoes. Shortly afterwards two more torpedoes were fired but none found their intended target. Piet Hein then turned around towards the US destroyers with the intention to attack the Japanese again. While doing so her smoke generator was started. It is not completely clear but it is possible that one of these US destroyers then engaged Piet Hein with gunfire thinking she was Japanese. It is also possible that it were the Japanese that engaged Piet Hein. At this time Piet Hein was hit several times, resulting in her to come to a stop. After about 15 minutes Piet Hein was illuminated by a Japanese searchlight and taken under fire. The crew was ordered to abandon the doomed destroyer and she soon sank.

USS John D. Ford and Pope sighted a Japanese transport vessel (this must have been the Sasaga Maru) and what they thought to be a Japanese cruiser but this must have been the destroyer Oshio. They launched torpedoes (Ford – three, Pope - five) and turned away. Asashio and Oshio when went after them. The Americans thought they faced a very powerful enemy, even heavy cruisers were thought to be present. Both destroyers then retired to the south-east to return to Tjilatjap. Shortly afterwards they heard gunfire. This gunfire was coming from both Japanese destroyer that were now engaging each other by mistake. After a few minutes the mistake was noticed and both Japanese destroyer retired up the Strait to the north.

Meanwhile the Allied second attack wave was nearing the scene of the action. They had arrived south of Bali around 0100/20. The four US destroyers were ahead of the Tromp. It was intended that the four US destroyer would enter Badoeng Strait and attack with torpedoes first and that the Tromp would come behind them to finish off the Japanese after the confusion of the torpedo attack. During the torpedo attack a total of fifteen torpedoes were fired, six each by USS Stewart and USS Pope and three by USS Pillsbury. Their targets, Asashio and Oshio were not hit and both Japanese destroyers now went after their attackers. Stewart was then hit with gunfire. The US destroyers then set course to the east to leave Badoeng Strait. Now Tromp went in. Soon she was illuminated by a searchlight and the Japanese opened fire. Thy obtained eleven hits on the Tromp causing heavy damage to the Dutch cruiser. The Oshio on her turn was seriously damaged by the Tromp. The action was over around 0215/20 and Tromp retired from the Strait to the north-east. When north of Bali she went to full speed and returned to Surabaya for repairs.

Japanese Rear-Admiral Kubo, on board the Nagara, had meanwhile ordered the Arashio and Michishio to return to Badoeng Strait (Nagara and her three escorting destroyers were too far off). When the two Japanese destroyers entered the Strait they encountered the four US destroyers. Both sides launched torpedoes but all missed their intended targets and then a gunfight was started. During this gunfight the Michishio was heavily damaged and in the end she had to be towed back to Makassar. The US destroyer meanwhile continued to retire from the area.

The third wave then entered the Strait. The Dutch MTB’s had seen the second wave attacking but when they entered Badoeng Strait the Japanese were not sighted and they left without being able to fire torpedoes.

The Allies were at that time under the impression that they had obtained a victory. They thought to have sunk a Japanese cruiser and have damaged two more cruisers and two destroyers. This was not the case, one Japanese destroyer was heavily damaged and one seriously. In return the Japanese sank a Dutch destroyer and damaged the Dutch cruiser Tromp heavily. As the Dutch naval base at Surabaya was now under daily air attack it was deemed wise to sent the Tromp to Australia for repairs.

20 Feb 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Surabaya for repairs. She had suffered 10 dead and 30 wounded (including her Commanding Officer) during the action in Badoeng Strait. (6)

23 Feb 1942
At 1700 hours, HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Surabaya to proceed to Sydney, Australia (via Fremantle) for repairs.

Tromp proceeded to the Indian Ocean via Strait Madoera and Strait Bali. She was clear of Strait Bali at 0215/24.

For the daily positions during the period of 23 February 1942 to 4 March 1942, see the map below.

(6)

27 Feb 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Fremantle, Australia. She departed for Sydney later the same day. (5)

4 Mar 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Sydney, Australia. (5)

6 Mar 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) shifted to one of the docks of the Cockatoo Dockyard for repairs to her action damage. (5)

26 Mar 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) was undocked. She then continued her refit at the Cockatoo Dockyard. (5)

25 Apr 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) completed her repair / refit period at Sydney. During this period two 3" AA guns, six 20mm Oerlikons, Asdic and radar were installed. (5)

27 Apr 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) started a period of post repair trials / exercises off Sydney. (5)

2 May 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Sydney. (5)

9 May 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) was docked at Sydney. (5)

10 May 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) was undocked. (5)

17 May 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Sydney for sea. She was ordered to perform an A/S search off Sydney together with the brand new Australian destroyer HMAS Arunta (Cdr. J.C. Morrow, DSO, RAN) and the US destroyer USS Perkins (Lt.Cdr. W.C. Ford, USN).

The previous day the Russian freighter Uelen (5106 GRT, built 1913) was attacked to the north of Sydney by the Japanese submarine I-29.

All three Allied ships returned to Sydney later the same day having found no enemy submarine. (5)

18 May 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Sydney for convoy escort duty together with HMAS Arunta (Cdr. J.C. Morrow, DSO, RAN). They were to escort convoy ZK 8 (Sydney - Townsville) northwards. Convoy ZK 8 was made up of four Dutch merchant vessels Bantam (3322 GRT, built 1930), Bontekoe (4668 GRT, built 1923), Van Heemskerk (2996 GRT, built 1909) and Van Heutsz (4588 GRT, built 1926).

For the daily positions during the period of 18 May 1942 to 24 May 1942, see the map below.

(5)

23 May 1942
At 1000 hours, HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and HMAS Arunta (Cdr. J.C. Morrow, DSO, RAN), turned over the escort of convoy ZK 8 over to HMAS Swan (Lt.Cdr. A.J. Travis, RAN), HMAS Goulburn (Lt. B. Paul, RANR(S)) and HMAS Cessnock (A/Lt.Cdr. T.S. Marchington, RANR(S)).

HrMs Tromp and HMAS Arunta then reversed course to return to Sydney. (5)

24 May 1942
Very late in the evening, HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and HMAS Arunta (Cdr. J.C. Morrow, DSO, RAN), arrived back at Sydney. (5)

25 May 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Sydney to escort the Dutch merchant vessel Swartenhondt (4661 GRT, built 1924) northwards.

For the daily positions during the period of 25 May 1942 to 31 May 1942, see the map below.

(5)

28 May 1942
At 0830 hours, HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) released the Dutch merchant vessel Swartenhondt (4661 GRT, built 1924) which she had been escorting northwards from Sydney.

Tromp then reversed course to return to Sydney. (5)

31 May 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Sydney. After fuelling she departed for yet another convoy mission.

Convoy ZK 9 was to be escorted northwards. This convoy was made up of the following merchant vessels; American Robert Gray (7176 GRT, built 1942) (joined off Melbourne on 2 June), Stephen A. Douglas (7176 GRT, built 1942) (joined off Melbourne on 2 June), Australian Katoomba (9424 GRT, built 1913), Ormiston (5815 GRT, built 1922) and Dutch Japara (3323, built 1930) (joined off Melbourne on 2 June). Besides Tromp they were escorted by the US destroyer USS Selfridge (Lt.Cdr. C.D. Reynolds, USN) and the Australian sloop HMAS Warrego (Lt.Cdr. A.H. Green, RAN). (5)

31 May 1942

For the daily positions of HrMs Tromp during the period of 31 May 1942 to 7 June 1942, see the map below.

(5)

4 Jun 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN), the American destroyer USS Selfridge (Lt.Cdr. C.D. Reynolds, USN), the American merchant Stephen A. Douglas (7176 GRT, built 1942), the Australian merchant Stephen A. Douglas (7176 GRT, built 1942) and the Dutch Japara (3323, built 1930) split off from the convoy off Rockhampton and proceeded towards that harbour.

After fuelling Tromp and Selfridge departed for Sydney later the same day.

7 Jun 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Sydney where she went to the Cockatoo Island Dockyard for repairs. (5)

15 Jun 1942
With her repairs completed HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed the Cockatoo Island Dockyard. (5)

19 Jun 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Sydney to escort the Australian auxiliary minelayer HMAS Bungaree (A/Cdr. N.K. Calder, RAN) to Nouméa, New Caledonia and back to Sydney.

For the daily positions during the period of 19 June 1942 to 2 July 1942, see the map below.

(5)

24 Jun 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the Australian auxiliary minelayer HMAS Bungaree (A/Cdr. N.K. Calder, RAN) arrived at Nouméa, New Caledonia. (9)

27 Jun 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the Australian auxiliary minelayer HMAS Bungaree (A/Cdr. N.K. Calder, RAN) departed Nouméa, New Caledonia for Sydney. (9)

2 Jul 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the Australian auxiliary minelayer HMAS Bungaree (A/Cdr. N.K. Calder, RAN) arrived at Sydney. (9)

4 Jul 1942

For the daily positions of HrMs Tromp during the period of 4 July 1942 to 14 July 1942, see the map below.

(9)

4 Jul 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Sydney as escort for convoy ZK 11 that was to proceed to Fremantle. Convoy ZK 11 was made up of the Australian liner Duntroon (10346 GRT, built 1935) and the Australian Armed Merchant Cruisers HMAS Manoora (A/Capt. J.M. Armstrong, RAN) and HMAS Westralia (A/Capt. (emergency) H.V. Hudson, OBE, RAN).

The American destroyer USS Flusser ( Lt.Cdr. L.H. Miller, USN) was also part of the escort until 0600/5 when she returned to Sydney as previously ordered. (9)

13 Jul 1942

'Schooner' convoy.

This convoy departed Colombo on 13 July 1942.

It was made up of the following (troop) transports; Aronda (British, 9031 GRT, built 1941), Athlone Castle (British, 25565 GRT, built 1936), City of Canterbury (British, 8331 GRT, built 1922), City of Lille (British, 6588 GRT, built 1928), Clan MacDonald (British, 9653 GRT, built 1939), Devonshire (British, 11275 GRT, built 1939), Dunedin Star (British, 11168 GRT, built 1936), Ekma (British, 5108 GRT, built 1911), Martand (British, 7967 GRT, built 1939), Rajula (British, 8478 GRT, built 1926) and Westernland (Dutch, 16479 GRT, built 1918).

On departure from Colombo the convoy was escorted by the light cruiser HMS Gambia (Capt. M.J. Mansergh, CBE, RN), armed merchant cruiser HMS Worcestershire (A/Capt.(Retd.) E.H. Hopkinson, RN), sloops HMIS Jumna (Cdr. J.E.N. Coope, RIN), HMIS Sutlej (Capt. P.A. Mare, RIN) and the corvettes HMS Aster (Lt. W.L. Smith, RNR) and HMS Tulip (Lt.Cdr. A. Wilkinson, RNR).

Around 1845F/14, HMIS Jumna, HMIS Sutlej, HMS Aster and HMS Tulip parted company in position 02°23'N, 80°23'E.

Around 1750F/16, the City of Lille was ordered to proceed independently as she was unable to keep up with the convoy. Position was 06°03'S, 81°34'E.

Around 1330F/19, the light cruiser USS Phoenix (Capt. H.E. Fischer, USN) took over from HMS Gambia in position 17°02'S, 82°24'E. HMS Gambia then parted company with the convoy to proceed to Mauritius.

Around 0715F/20, the armed merchant cruiser HMS Kanimbla (A/Capt. W.L.G. Adams, RN) took over from HMS Worcestershire in position 20°11'S, 83°17'E. HMS Worcestershire then parted company with the convoy to proceed to Mauritius.

Around 0855H/27, the destroyer HMAS Voyager (Lt.Cdr. R.C. Robison DSC, RAN) joined the convoy in position 31°04'S, 112°00'E.

Around 1350H/27, the minesweeper HMIS Madras (Lt. S.G. Karmarkar, RINR) joined the convoy and five minutes later the convoy was split up, in position 31°11'S, 112°16'E, into two sections ' Schooner A ' for Melbourne and ' Schooner B ' for Fremantle.

' Schooner A ' was made up of the transports Athlone Castle, City of Canterbury, Dunedin Star and Martand. They were escorted by USS Phoenix and HMAS Voyager.

' Schooner B ' was made up of the transports Aronda, Clan MacDonald, Devonshire, Ekma, Rajula and Westernland. They were escorted by HMS Kanimbla and HMIS Madras.

' Schooner B ' arrived at Fremantle in the morning of the 28th.

At 1015H/28, in position 33°28'S, 113°48'E, ' Schooner A ' merged with convoy ZK 12 which was coming from Fremantle escorted by the light cruiser HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN). Convoy ZK 12 was made up of the transport Duntroon (10346 GRT, built 1935) and the armed merchant cruisers HMAS Manoora (A/Capt. J.M. Armstrong, RAN) and HMAS Westralia (A/Capt.(Emgy.) H.V. Hudson, OBE, RAN).

Around 1900H/29, in position 36°45'S, 119°48'E, HrMs Tromp and HMAS Voyager parted company with convoy ' Schooner B '. They were to return to Fremantle.

Around 0530K/3, the Athlone Castle, City of Canterbury, Dunedin Star and Martand parted company with the convoy and proceeded to Melbourne.

Around 0715K/5, the destroyer HMAS Arunta (Cdr. J.C. Morrow, DSO, RAN) joined the convoy.

The convoy arrived at Sydney around 1630K/5.

14 Jul 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Fremantle. (9)

20 Jul 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle for Albany. (9)

22 Jul 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Albany. (9)

24 Jul 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Albany as escort for the US submarine tender USS Holland (T/Capt. P.E. Pendelton, USN) and the US submarines USS Seal (Lt.Cdr. K.C. Hurd, USN) and USS Saury (Lt.Cdr. L.S. Mewhinney, USN). (9)

25 Jul 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN), USS Holland (T/Capt. P.E. Pendelton, USN) and the US submarines USS Seal (Lt.Cdr. K.C. Hurd, USN) and USS Saury (Lt.Cdr. L.S. Mewhinney, USN) arrived at Fremantle.

27 Jul 1942

For the daily positions of HrMs Tromp during the period of 27 July 1942 to 31 July 1942, see the map below.

(9)

27 Jul 1942

Convoy ZK 12.

This convoy departed Fremantle on 27 July 1942.

It was made up of the transport Duntroon (10346 GRT, built 1935) and the armed merchant cruisers HMAS Manoora (A/Capt. J.M. Armstrong, RAN) and HMAS Westralia (A/Capt.(Emgy.) H.V. Hudson, OBE, RAN).

The convoy was escorted by the light cruiser HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN).

The convoy merged with convoy ' Schooner A ' at 1015H/28, in position 33°28'S, 113°48'E. (9)

29 Jul 1942
Around 1900H/29, HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and HMAS Voyager (Lt.Cdr. R.C. Robison DSC, RAN), parted from the combined convoy ' Schooner A / ZK 12 '. (10)

31 Jul 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (9)

2 Aug 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle for a rendes-vous in the Indian Ocean with the British passenger (troops) / cargo ship Stirling Castle (25550 GRT, built 1936) to take over the escort from the British light cruiser HMS Gambia (Capt. M.J. Mansergh, CBE, RN).

For the daily positions during the period of 2 August 1942 to 10 August 1942, see the map below.

(9)

6 Aug 1942
At 1015 hours, in position 32°05'N, 96°00'E, HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) made rendes-vous with the British passenger (troops) / cargo ship Stirling Castle (25550 GRT, built 1936) and her escort from the British light cruiser HMS Gambia (Capt. M.J. Mansergh, CBE, RN). (9)

9 Aug 1942
Around 1210H/9, in position 38°06'N, 115°44'E, HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) made rendevous with HMAS Adelaide (A/Capt. J.C.D. Esdaile, OBE, RAN) and turned over the escort of the troopsship Stirling Castle (British, 25550 GRT, built 1936) to her. Hrms Tromp then set course to return to Fremantle. (9)

10 Aug 1942
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived back at Fremantle. (9)

23 Aug 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) made a short A/S patrol off Fremantle. Possibly the US submarine USS Gar (Cdr. D. McGregor, USN) was briefly escorted part of the way south to Albany. Tromp returned to Fremantle later the same day. (9)

23 Aug 1942

Convoys US 16 and US 17.

Convoy US 16.

Convoy US 16 departed Sydney on 23 August 1942.

It was made up of the following (troop) transports; Aronda (British, 9031 GRT, built 1941) and Devonshire (British, 11275 GRT, built 1939).

The convoy was escorted by the armed merchant cruiser HMS Kanimbla (A/Capt. W.L.G. Adams, RN).

The transport Rajula (British, 8478 GRT, built 1926) joined the convoy PM on the 27th in position 18°40'S, 140°40'E.

The convoy was joined by the light cruiser HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) at 0845H/2.

The convoy arrived at Fremantle on 3 September 1942.

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Convoy US 17.

Convoy US 17 departed Sydney on 24 August 1942.

It was made up of the following (troop) transports; Ekma (British, 5108 GRT, built 1911), Felix Roussel (British, 17083 GRT, built 1930), Lilian Luckenbach (American, 6339 GRT, built 1919), Westernland (Dutch, 16479 GRT, built 1918).

The convoy was escorted by the armed merchant cruiser HMAS Manoora (A/Capt. J.M. Armstrong, RAN).

At 1415K/28, the convoy was joined by the light cruiser HMAS Adelaide (A/Capt. J.C.D. Esdaile, OBE, RAN) coming from Melbourne.

The convoy arrived at Fremantle on 4 September 1942.

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The now combined convoy US 16 / US 17 departed Fremantle on 7 September. It was now escorted by the light cruisers HMAS Adelaide, HrMs Tromp, armed merchant cruisers HMS Kanimbla, HMAS Manoora and the destroyer HMAS Voyager (Lt.Cdr. R.C. Robison DSC, RAN).

Around 0700H/8, HMAS Voyager was detached to return to Fremantle.

Around 1000FG/11, the heavy cruiser HMS Devonshire (Capt. R.D. Oliver, CBE, DSC, RN) joined the convoy coming from Colombo. HMAS Adelaide and HrMs Tromp then parted company to return to Fremantle.

Around 0930FG/14, the light cruiser HMS Mauritius (Capt. W.D. Stephens, RN) joined the convoy which was then split up. HMS Mauritius and HMS Kanimbla proceeded to Colombo with convoy US 16. HMS Devonshire proceeded to Durban with convoy US 17. HMAS Manoora returned to Fremantle.

Convoy US 16 was joined by the destroyer HMS Scout (Lt.Cdr.(Retd.) H. Lambton, RN) around 0900FG/19. Later the same day HMS Scout developed rudder problems and had to be steered by her engines. She and HMS Kanimbla were then detached to proceed to Colombo in company while HMS Mauritius remained with the convoy. Both the convoy escorted by HMS Mauritius and HMS Scout in company with HMS Kanimbla arrived at Colombo on 23 September 1942.

Convoy US 16 departed Colombo for Aden on 24 September 1942 now escorted by the light cruiser HMS Mauritius, sloop HMS Shoreham (Cdr. E. Hewitt, RD, RNR) and the minelayer HrMs Willem van der Zaan (Lt.Cdr. G.P. Küller, RNN).

Around 2000F/26, HrMs Willem van der Zaan parted company with convoy US 16 to return to Colombo where she arrived on 29 September 1942.

Around 0800F/28, HMS Shoreham parted company with convoy US 16 to proceed to Bombay where she arrived on 1 October 1942.

Convoy US 16 arrived at Aden on 2 October 1942.

Convoy US 17 meanwhile had arrived at Durban on 23 September 1942.

1 Sep 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle to bolster the escort of convoy US 16 that was coming from Sydney. This convoy was made up of the British liner (troopship) Devonshire (11275 GRT, built 1939), passenger (troops) / cargo ships Rajula (8478 GRT, built 1926) and Aronda (8328 GRT, built 1941), their escort, if any, is currently unknown to us.

Tromp joined the escort of the convoy at 0845/2. (9)

3 Sep 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Fremantle. (9)

7 Sep 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and HMAS Adelaide (A/Capt. J.C.D. Esdaile, OBE, RAN) departed Fremantle as escort for convoy US 17 that left Fremantle for Durban, South-Africa. This convoy was made up of the British liner (troopship) Felix Roussel (16774 GRT, built 1931, former French), Dutch liner (troopship) Westernland (16313 GRT, built 1918), American cargo ship Lillian Luckenbach (8739 GRT, built 1919) and British passenger / cargo ship Ekma (5128 GRT, built 1911).

For the daily positions during the period of 7 September 1942 to 14 September 1942, see the map below.

(9)

7 Sep 1942
The light cruisers HMAS Adelaide (A/Capt. J.C.D. Esdaile, OBE, RAN), HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN), armed merchant cruisers HMS Kanimbla (A/Capt. W.L.G. Adams, RN), HMAS Manoora (A/Capt. J.M. Armstrong, RAN) and the destroyer HMAS Voyager (Lt.Cdr. R.C. Robison DSC, RAN) departed Fremantle escorting the combined convoys US 16 and US 17.

[For more info on these convoys see the event ' Convoys US 16 and US 17 ' for 23 August 1942.] (11)

11 Sep 1942
Around 1140FG/11, HMAS Adelaide (A/Capt. J.C.D. Esdaile, OBE, RAN) and HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN), turned over the escort for convoy US 17 to HMS Devonshire (Capt. R.D. Oliver, CBE, DSC, RN). HMAS Adelaide and HrMs Tromp then set course to return to Fremantle. (12)

14 Sep 1942
Around 1100H,14, HMAS Adelaide (A/Capt. J.C.D. Esdaile, OBE, RAN) and HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle from escort duty. (12)

24 Sep 1942
Around 0825H/24, HMAS Adelaide (A/Capt. J.C.D. Esdaile, OBE, RAN) and HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle for exercises. (12)

26 Sep 1942
Around 0745H/26, HMAS Adelaide (A/Capt. J.C.D. Esdaile, OBE, RAN) and HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle from exercises. (12)

30 Sep 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted exercises off Fremantle. (9)

6 Oct 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle for Sydney via Melbourne. On departure she carried out exercises with HMAS Adelaide (A/Capt. J.C.D. Esdaile, OBE, RAN).

For the daily positions during the period of 6 October 1942 to 16 October 1942, see the map below.

(9)

12 Oct 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Melbourne. (9)

16 Oct 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Sydney for a maintenance period. (9)

20 Oct 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) is docked at the Cockatoo Island Dockyard. (9)

28 Oct 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) is undocked. (9)

20 Nov 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted trails off Sydney. (9)

22 Nov 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Sydney for Melbourne.

For the daily positions during the period of 22 November 1942 to 11 December 1942, see the map below.

(9)

25 Nov 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Williamstown, Melbourne. (9)

2 Dec 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Williamstown, Melbourne for Burnie, Tasmania. (9)

3 Dec 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Burnie, Tasmania. (9)

7 Dec 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Burnie, Tasmania to make rendezvous with the troopship Mauretania (British, 35739 GRT, built 1939) coming from Fremantle. (9)

8 Dec 1942
Around 1800KL/8, the light cruiser HMAS Adelaide (A/Capt. J.C.D. Esdaile, OBE, RAN) was relieved of the escort of the troopship Mauretania (British, 35739 GRT, built 1939) by the light cruiser HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN). (13)

11 Dec 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Sydney. (9)

12 Dec 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Sydney for Wellington, New Zealand escorting the British liner (troopship) Mauretania (35738, built 1939).

For the daily positions during the period of 12 December 1942 to 20 December 1942, see the map below.

(9)

15 Dec 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Wellington. (9)

16 Dec 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Wellington for Melbourne. (9)

20 Dec 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Melbourne. (9)

22 Dec 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Melbourne for Fremantle. During this passage the British passenger (troops) / cargo ship Nestor (14501 GRT, built 1913) was escorted.

For the daily positions during the period of 22 December 1942 to 30 December 1942, see the map below.

(9)

30 Dec 1942
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Fremantle. (9)

2 Jan 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle to briefly escort the British passenger (troops) / cargo ship Nestor (14501 GRT, built 1913) southwards. (9)

3 Jan 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (9)

5 Jan 1943
Around 0615I/5, the troopship Ile de France (British, 43548 GRT, built 1927, former French) departed Fremantle for Bombay.

She was being escorted by the light cruisers HMAS Adelaide (A/Capt. J.C.D. Esdaile, OBE, RAN) and HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) of which the last one acted in the A/S role.

Around 2100I/5, HrMs Tromp parted company to return to Fremantle.

Around 2000GH/5, HMAS Adelaide parted company with the Ile de France to return to Fremantle.

The troopship then continued on unescorted and arrived at Bombay on the 14th. (14)

6 Jan 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (9)

8 Jan 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle to briefly escort the US cargo vessel Adabelle Lykes (5093 GRT, built 1942). (9)

9 Jan 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (9)

11 Jan 1943
During 11 and 12 January 1943, HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and HrMs Jacob van Heemskerck (Capt. E.J. van Holthe, RNN) conducted exercises off Fremantle. (9)

15 Jan 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle to escort the US Navy cargo ship USS Gold Star (4871 GRT, built 1920).

For the daily positions during the period of 15 January 1943 to 18 January 1943, see the map below.

(9)

16 Jan 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) relaesed the Australian passerger / cargo ship Reynella (9780 GRT, built 1926, former Italian Remo). She then was to make rendes-vous with the Australian passerger / cargo ship Reynella (9780 GRT, built 1926, former Italian Remo) but this ship failed to show up at the rendes-vous and Tromp eventually set course to return to Fremantle. (9)

18 Jan 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (9)

20 Jan 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted gunnery exercises off Fremantle. (9)

25 Jan 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNethN) and HrMs Tjerk Hiddes (Lt.Cdr. W.J. Kruys, RNethN) conducted A/S exercises off Fremantle with USS Thresher (T/Cdr. W.J. Millican, USN). (9)

27 Jan 1943
HMAS Adelaide (A/Capt. J.C.D. Esdaile, OBE, RAN), HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and HrMs Jacob van Heemskerck (Capt. E.J. van Holthe, RNN) departed Fremantle for exercises about 100 nautical miles west off Rottnest Island.

They returned to Fremantle on the 29th. (14)

1 Feb 1943

'Pamphlet' convoy, Suez - Sydney, 1 February to 27 February 1943.

This convoy, made up of the troopships Queen Mary (81235 GRT, built 1936), Aquitania (45647 GRT, built 1914), Ile de France (43548 GRT, built 1927, former French), Nieuw Amsterdam (36287 GRT, built 1938) and the British auxiliary cruiser Queen of Bermuda (A/Capt.(Retd.) the Hon. Sir A.D. Cochrane, DSO, RN) (22575 GRT, built 1933) were transporting 30000 men of the Australian 9th Division from Suez to Melbourne and Sydney.

This convoy had departed Suez on 1 February 1943 and were escorted during their passage through the Red Sea by the destroyers HMS Pakenham (Capt. E.B.K. Stevens, DSO, DSC, RN), HMS Petard (Lt.Cdr. R.C. Egan, RN), HMS Isis (Cdr. B. Jones, DSC, RN), HMS Hero (Lt.Cdr. W. Scott, DSC and Bar, RN), RHS Vasilissa Olga (Lt.Cdr. G. Blessas, DSO, RHN) and the escort destroyer Derwent (Cdr. R.H. Wright, DSC, RN).

The convoy was joined around 1545C/4 by the heavy cruiser HMS Devonshire (Capt. D. Young-Jamieson, RN).

Around 1800E/6, HMS Hero and HMS Derwent parted company with the convoy to proceed to Aden.

Around 2000E/6, HMS Pakenham, HMS Petard, HMS Isis and RHS Vasilissa Olga parted company with the convoy to proceed to Aden.

Around 1230FG/9, the destroyers HMS Quilliam (Capt. S.H. Carlill, DSO, RN) and HMS Foxhound (Cdr. C.J. Wynne-Edwards, DSC and Bar, RN) joined the convoy.

The convoy entered Addu Atoll late in the afternoon / early in the evening of the 9th where all warships fuelled.

The convoy departed Addu Atoll to continue its passage to Australia in the afternoon of the 10th. The light cruiser HMS Gambia (Capt. M.J. Mansergh, CBE, RN) had joined the convoy escort.

Around 0030FG/11, HMS Quilliam and HMS Foxhound parted company to proceed to Addu Atoll.

Around 0840H/16, the light cruiser HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNethN) and the destroyer HrMs Van Galen (Lt.Cdr. F.T. Burghard, RNethN) joined the convoy in approximate postion 26°06'S, 101°09'E.

Around 2000H/16, the AA cruiser HrMs Jacob van Heemskerck (Capt. E.J. van Holthe, RNethN) joined the convoy in approximate position 27°41'S, 104°35'E.

Around 2000H/17, the destroyer HrMs Tjerk Hiddes (Lt.Cdr. W.J. Kruys, RNethN) joined the convoy in approximate position 30°30'S, 112°52'E.

In the afternoon of the 18th the convoy arrived off Fremantle.

Around 1800I/20, the convoy departed Fremantle now escorted by the light cruiser HMAS Adelaide (A/Capt. J.C.D. Esdaile, OBE, RAN), AA cruiser HrMs Jacob van Heemskerck and the destroyers HrMs Van Galen and HrMs Tjerk Hiddes (Lt.Cdr. W.J. Kruys, RNethN).

Around 2300I/21, HrMs Van Galen parted company to return to Fremantle.

Around 1645KL/24, the convoy was joined by the heavy cruiser Australia (Capt. H.B. Farncomb, MVO, DSO, RAN) and the destroyers USS Henley (Lt.Cdr. E.K. van Swearingen, USN) and USS Bagley (Lt.Cdr. T.E. Chambers, USN). The New Amsterdam escorted by HMAS Adelaide, HrMs Heemskerk and HrMs Tjerk Hiddes then departed the convoy and proceeded to Port Phillip where they arrived arrived around 1000L/25. The other ships continued to Sydney.

In the afternoon of the 26th the HrMs Heemskerck rejoined the convoy. Later in the afternoon the destroyer Le Triomphant (Cdr. P.M.J.R. Auboyneau) also joined.

The convoy arrived at Sydney on the 27th.

2 Feb 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle to make rendes-vous with the British aircraft transport HMS Athene (T/A/Cdr. C.H. Moulton, RNR) in estimated position 33°52'S, 109°23'E in the afternoon of the following day and then to escort that vessel to Fremantle.

For the daily positions during the period of 2 February 1943 to 8 February 1943, see the map below.

(9)

3 Feb 1943
Around 1400 hours, HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN), made rendes-vous with the British aircraft transport HMS Athene (T/A/Cdr. C.H. Moulton, RNR) in position 33°42'S, 109°33'E. (9)

4 Feb 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle escorting the British aircraft transport HMS Athene (T/A/Cdr. C.H. Moulton, RNR). (9)

6 Feb 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle escorting the British aircraft transport HMS Athene (T/A/Cdr. C.H. Moulton, RNR) southwards until 1200/7. (9)

7 Feb 1943
At 1840 hours, HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN), made rendes-vous with the British liner (troopship) Mauretania (35738, built 1939) to escort her to Fremantle. Later that evening the were joined by the Dutch destroyer HrMs Van Galen (Lt.Cdr. F.T. Burghard, RNN). (9)

8 Feb 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle escorting the British liner (troopship) Mauretania (35738, built 1939). (9)

10 Feb 1943
Around 0730I/10, the troopship Mauretania (British, 35738 GRT, built 1939) departed Fremantle for Bombay. On departure from Fremantle she was escorted by the light cruisers HMAS Adelaide (A/Capt. J.C.D. Esdaile, OBE, RAN), HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the destroyer HrMs Van Galen (Lt.Cdr. F.T. Burghard, RNN).

HrMs Tromp and HrMs Van Galen were to escort the Mauretania until dark (around 2100I/10) this day acting as A/S escort and were then to return to Fremantle. HMAS Adelaide was to remain with the Mauretania until near longtitude 100°E. She parted company with the Mauretania around 0700H/18 and set course to return to Fremantle.

The troopship arrived at Bombay on 19 February 1943. (15)

11 Feb 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and HrMs Van Galen (Lt.Cdr. F.T. Burghard, RNN) retuned to Fremantle. (9)

13 Feb 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and HrMs Van Galen (Lt.Cdr. F.T. Burghard, RNN) departed Fremantle to join convoy 'Pamphlet' at sea.

[For more info on the Pamplet convoy see the event for 1 February 1943.]

For the daily positions during the period of 13 February 1943 to 23 February 1943, see the map below.

18 Feb 1943
HMS Devonshire (Capt. D. Young-Jamieson, RN), HMS Gambia (Capt. M.J. Mansergh, CBE, RN), HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNethN), HrMs Jacob van Heemskerck (Capt. E.J. van Holthe, RNethN), HrMs Van Galen (Lt.Cdr. F.T. Burghard, RNethN) en HrMs Tjerk Hiddes (Lt.Cdr. W.J. Kruys, RNethN) arrived at Fremantle with the Pamphlet convoy. (16)

20 Feb 1943
HMS Devonshire (Capt. D. Young-Jamieson, RN) and HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle to act as escort for the US troopship USS Monticello (Cdr. B.B. Lanier, USNR) (25661 GRT, built 1928, former Italian liner Conte Grande).

HrMs Tromp was detached to return to Fremantle around 2030I/21. (17)

23 Feb 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (17)

3 Mar 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle as escort for convoy OW 2 (Fremantle - Colombo) which was made up of the US cargo ship Mormacdove (6711 GRT, built 1942) and the British Armed Merchant Cruiser Queen of Bermuda (A/Capt.(Retd.) the Hon. Sir A.D. Cochrane, DSO, RN) (22575 GRT, built 1933). The British light cruiser HMS Gambia (Capt. M.J. Mansergh, CBE, RN) also sailed from Fremantle on this day to provide distant cover for this convoy.

Due to some missing pages in the ships log no map for the daily positions during the period of 3 March 1943 to 6 March 1943 can be displayed. (17)

6 Mar 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (17)

8 Mar 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle as escort for convoy OW 5 (Fremantle - Colombo) which was made up of the American cargo ships Cape CharlesFairisle (6165 GRT, built 1942). Tromp escorted the convoy until dark the following day. (17)

10 Mar 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (17)

13 Mar 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle to briefly escort the American cargo ship Extavia (6535 GRT, built 1941). (17)

14 Mar 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (17)

15 Mar 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted exercises off Fremantle together with USS Grenadier (Cdr. J.A. Fitzgerald, USN). (17)

16 Mar 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted exercises off Fremantle together with USS Isabel (Lt. F.D. Buckley, USN) and USS Grenadier (Cdr. J.A. Fitzgerald, USN). (17)

19 Mar 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle for exercises. (17)

21 Mar 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (17)

23 Mar 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle to briefly escort (until dark this day) the British liner (troopship) Ile de France (43548 GRT, built 1927, former French) when she was on passage near Fremantle. (17)

24 Mar 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (17)

26 Mar 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted gunnery exercises off Fremantle. (17)

30 Mar 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted exercises off Fremantle together with HrMs Van Galen (Lt.Cdr. F.T. Burghard, RNN). (17)

31 Mar 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle to briefly escort (until dark this day) the American cargo ship Carlos Carrillo (7176 GRT, built 1943). (17)

1 Apr 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (17)

6 Apr 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted gunnery exercises off Fremantle. (17)

13 Apr 1943
HMAS Adelaide (A/Capt. J.C.D. Esdaile, OBE, RAN), HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNethN) and HrMs Tjerk Hiddes (Lt.Cdr. W.J. Kruys, RNethN) conducted exercises off Fremantle. (17)

20 Apr 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNethN) and HrMs Tjerk Hiddes (Lt.Cdr. W.J. Kruys, RNethN) conducted A/S exercises off Fremantle with USS Gar (T/Cdr. P.D. Quirk, USN, USN). (17)

21 Apr 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted A/S exercises off Fremantle together with USS Gar (Cdr. P.D. Quirk, USN, USN). (17)

27 Apr 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle to make rendes-vous with the US Naval tanker USS Trinity (Cdr. W.W. Angerer, USN) coming from the Persian Gulf and escort her to Fremantle.

For the daily positions during the period of 27 April 1943 to 30 April 1943, see the map below.

(17)

28 Apr 1943
Around 1330 hours, in approximate position 29°00'S, 109°06'E, HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) made rendes-vous with the US Naval tanker USS Trinity (Cdr. W.W. Angerer, USN). (17)

30 Apr 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (17)

5 May 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted A/S exercises off Fremantle together with HMAS Dubbo (T/Lt. N.G. Weber, RANR(S)) and USS Tambor (Lt.Cdr. R. Kefauver, USN). (17)

7 May 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted A/S exercises off Fremantle together with USS Tautog (Cdr. W.B. Sieglaff, USN) and USS Tambor (Lt.Cdr. R. Kefauver, USN). (17)

8 May 1943
Around 0830H/8, the light cruiser HMAS Adelaide (A/Capt. J.C.D. Esdaile, OBE, RAN) departed Fremantle for Melbourne. A/S escort was provided by the light cruiser HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) until around 1800H/8. She then set course to return to Fremantle. (18)

9 May 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (17)

11 May 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted exercises off Fremantle together with HrMs Jacob van Heemskerck (Capt. W. Harmsen, RNN). (17)

12 May 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted exercises off Fremantle together with HrMs Jacob van Heemskerck (Capt. W. Harmsen, RNN). (17)

15 May 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle to escort the US Naval tanker USS Trinity (Cdr. W.W. Angerer, USN) on her way from Fremantle to the Persian Gulf until dark the following day. (17)

17 May 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (19)

18 May 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNethN), HrMs Jacob van Heemskerck (Capt. W. Harmsen, RNethN) and HrMs Tjerk Hiddes (Lt.Cdr. W.J. Kruys, RNethN) conducted exercises off Fremantle with USS Grayling (T/Cdr. J.E. Lee, USN). (19)

19 May 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNethN), HrMs Jacob van Heemskerck (Capt. W. Harmsen, RNethN) and HrMs Tjerk Hiddes (Lt.Cdr. W.J. Kruys, RNethN) conducted exercises off Fremantle. (19)

20 May 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNethN) and HrMs Tjerk Hiddes (Lt.Cdr. W.J. Kruys, RNethN) conducted exercises off Fremantle. (19)

21 May 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle to escort the British liner (troopship) Dominion Monarch (27155 GRT, built 1939) towards that port. Dominion Monarch was already escorted by the Australian light cruiser HMAS Adelaide (A/Capt. J.C.D. Esdaile, OBE, RAN). (19)

23 May 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (19)

26 May 1943

Convoy US 19.

This convoy departed Fremantle on 26 May 1943.

It was made up of the troop transports;
Dominion Monarch (British, 27155 GRT, built 1939) and Nieuw Amsterdam (Dutch, 36287 GRT, built 1938).

On departure from Fremantle the convoy was escorted by the light cruiser HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNethN) and the destroyer HrMs Tjerk Hiddes (Lt.Cdr. W.J. Kruys, RNethN).

Around 0700H/27, when near longtitude 110°00'E, HrMs Tjerk Hiddes parted company to return to Fremantle.

Around 1630FG/29, near position 25°19'S, 91°00'E, the heavy cruiser HMS Sussex (Capt. W.Y.La R. Beverley, RN) took over the escort duties from HrMs Tromp which then set course to return to Fremantle.

Around 1500FG/2, the armed merchant cruiser HMS Canton ( A/Cdr.(Retd.) R.J.E. Daintree, RN) joined and the convoy split up. the armed merchant cruiser and the Dominion Monarch (British, 27155 GRT, built 1939) set course for Aden where they arrived around 1200C/10.

HMS Sussex and the Nieuw Amsterdam continued on towards Colombo where they arrived around 0930FG/4. (20)

2 Jun 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (19)

8 Jun 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted exercises off Fremantle together with HrMs Van Galen (Lt.Cdr. F.T. Burghard, RNN). (19)

9 Jun 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted exercises off Fremantle together with HrMs Jacob van Heemskerck (Capt. W. Harmsen, RNN). (19)

17 Jun 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted exercises off Fremantle together with HrMs Van Galen (Lt.Cdr. F.T. Burghard, RNN) and USS Gar (Cdr. P.D. Quirk, USN, USN). (19)

18 Jun 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) briefly conducted exercises off Fremantle (19)

22 Jun 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted gunnery exercises off Fremantle. (19)

24 Jun 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle to make rendes-vous with the Dutch liner (troopship) Nieuw Amsterdam (36287 GRT, built 1938).

Later this day Tromp was ordered to make rendes-vous with the American cargo ship William M. Gwin (7176 GRT, built 1943) to take off a member of the armed guard that was stricken with appendicitis.

For the daily positions during the period of 24 June 1943 to 1 July 1943, see the map below.

(19)

25 Jun 1943
At 1150 hours, in position 30°06'S, 108°13'E, HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN), made rendes-vous with the American cargo ship William M. Gwin (7176 GRT, built 1943) and took over a crewmember stricken with appendicitis. (19)

28 Jun 1943
Around 1400 hours, in position 24°31'S, 90°44'E, the Dutch light cruiser HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN), made rendes-vous with the troopship Nieuw Amsterdam (Dutch, 36287 GRT, built 1938) and her escort the British heavy cruiser HMS Sussex (Capt. W.Y.La R. Beverley, RN). HrMs Tromp then took over the escort from HMS Sussex which then set course towards Mauritius. (19)

1 Jul 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (19)

6 Jul 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted exercises off Fremantle together with HrMs Van Galen (Lt.Cdr. F.T. Burghard, RNN). (19)

7 Jul 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle to proceed at high speed towards position 27.29'S, 106.29'E where the American cargo ship American Manufacturer (6678 GRT, built 1941) reported being attacked by an enemy submarine. This alert was later cancelled and Tromp was recalled to Fremantle. (19)

8 Jul 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (19)

13 Jul 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted exercises off Fremantle together with HrMs Van Galen (Lt.Cdr. F.T. Burghard, RNN). (19)

14 Jul 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted A/S exercises off Fremantle together with the US submarine USS Finback (Lt.Cdr. J.A. Tyree, Jr., USN). (19)

15 Jul 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted A/S exercises off Fremantle together with the US submarine USS Finback (Lt.Cdr. J.A. Tyree, Jr., USN). (19)

22 Jul 1943
HrMs K XII (Lt.Cdr. T. Brunsting, RNethN) conducted A/S exercises off Fremantle with HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNethN) and HrMs Tjerk Hiddes (Lt.Cdr. W.J. Kruys, RNethN). (19)

28 Jul 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted A/S exercises off Fremantle together with the US submarine USS Grayling (Lt.Cdr. R.M. Brinker, USN). (19)

30 Jul 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNethN) and HrMs Tjerk Hiddes (Lt.Cdr. W.J. Kruys, RNethN) conducted exercises off Fremantle. (21)

4 Aug 1943

For the daily positions of HrMs Tromp during the period of 4 August 1943 to 12 August 1943, see the map below.

(19)

4 Aug 1943

Convoy US 20.

This convoy departed Freemantle on 4 August 1943 and was dispersed on 16 August 1943.

It was made up of the following transports; Cape Henlopen (American, 5094 GRT, built 1942), Cape St.George (American, 5105 GRT, built 1942), Tarakan (Dutch, 8183 GRT, built 1930), Tatra (Norwegian, 4766 GRT, built 1937) and Tawali (Dutch, 8152 GRT, built 1931).

On departure from Fremantle, the convoy was escorted by the light cruiser HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) and the HrMs Van Galen (Lt.Cdr. F.T. Burghard, RNN).

At dusk on the 5th, HrMs van Galen parted company and returned to Fremantle.

At 1400FG/9, in position 21°13'S, 93°04'E, HrMs Tromp turned over the escort of the convoy the light cruiser HMS Kenya (Capt. D.P. Evans, RN).

At 1900F/15, HMS Kenya the convoy was dispersed in position 00°10'N, 70°09'E. (22)

9 Aug 1943
Shortly after 1400 hours, in position 21°13'S, 93°04'E, HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) was relieved as escort for convoy US 20 by the British light cruiser HMS Kenya (Capt. D.P. Evans, RN). (19)

12 Aug 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (19)

13 Sep 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) conducted compass calibration trials off Fremantle. (23)

14 Sep 1943
HrMs K XII (Lt.Cdr. T. Brunsting, RNN) conducted A/S exercises off Fremantle with the Dutch light cruiser HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN). (23)

22 Sep 1943
Around 0530H/22, HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNethN) departed Fremantle to escort the troop transport Nieuw Amsterdam (Dutch, 36287 GRT, built 1938) to Melbourne.

HrMs Tjerk Hiddes (Lt.Cdr. W.J. Kruys, RNethN) was with them until 1600H/22 when she parted company. (24)

26 Sep 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) arrived at Melbourne. (23)

27 Sep 1943
HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) was docked at Melbourne. (23)

13 Oct 1943
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. F. Stam, RNN) was undocked. (23)

25 Oct 1943
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. F. Stam, RNN) departed Melbourne for Sydney. (23)

27 Oct 1943
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Sydney. (23)

6 Nov 1943
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. F. Stam, RNN) was fumigated at Sydney. (23)

25 Nov 1943
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. F. Stam, RNN) departed Sydney for Melbourne.

For the daily positions during the period of 25 November 1943 to 6 December 1943, see the map below.

(23)

27 Nov 1943
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Melbourne. (23)

29 Nov 1943
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. F. Stam, RNN) conducted exercises off Melbourne. (23)

30 Nov 1943
HrMs Tromp (Cdr. F. Stam, RNN) conducted exercises off Melbourne. (23)

1 Dec 1943
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted exercises off Melbourne. (23)

2 Dec 1943
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Melbourne for Fremantle. (23)

6 Dec 1943
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Fremantle. (23)

10 Dec 1943
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Fremantle to make rendes-vous with the US Army transport (troopship) Uruguay (20325 GRT, built 1928). (23)

11 Dec 1943
Around 1300 hours, in position 06°29'S, 116°51'E, HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN), made rendez-vous with the US Army transport (troopship) Uruguay (20325 GRT, built 1928). (23)

12 Dec 1943
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (23)

15 Dec 1943
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted A/S exercises off Fremantle together with the US submarine USS Rasher (Lt.Cdr. W.R. Laughon, USN). (23)

16 Dec 1943
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted exercises off Fremantle. (23)

20 Dec 1943
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Fremantle to make rendes-vous with the British liner (troopship) Mooltan (20847 GRT, built 1923). (23)

21 Dec 1943
Around 1230 hours, in position 30°30'S, 109°09'E, HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN), made rendez-vous with the the British liner (troopship) Mooltan (20847 GRT, built 1923). (23)

22 Dec 1943
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (23)

23 Dec 1943
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Fremantle to escort the British liner (troopship) Mooltan (20847 GRT, built 1923) southwards until 0700/24. (23)

24 Dec 1943
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) returned to Fremantle. (23)

4 Jan 1944

For the daily positions of HrMs Tromp during the period of 4 January 1944 to 13 January 1944, see the map below.

(23)

4 Jan 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Fremantle for Colombo where she was to join the Eastern Fleet. During the passege Tromp acted as escort for the British escort carrier HMS Patroller (Capt. A.I. Robertson, RNR). (23)

12 Jan 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) and the British escort carrier HMS Patroller (Capt. A.I. Robertson, RNR) were joined around 1300FG/12 by the Australian destroyers HMAS Napier (Lt.Cdr. A.H. Green, DSC, RAN) and HMAS Nizam (Cdr. C.H. Brooks, RAN).

Around 0800FG/13, HrMs Tromp parted company to proceed to Colombo where she arrived around 1500C/13. (25)

19 Jan 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Colombo for Trincomalee. (23)

20 Jan 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Trincomalee. (23)

25 Jan 1944
During 25/26 January 1944, HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN), conducted exercises off Trincomalee together with the British light cruiser HMS Emerald (Capt. F.J. Wylie, RN). (23)

31 Jan 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted A/S exercises off Trincomalee together with the British submarine HMS Trespasser (Lt.Cdr. R.M. Favell, RN). (23)

1 Feb 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) returned to Trincomalee. (23)

3 Feb 1944
During 3/4 February 1944, HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN), conducted exercises off Trincomalee together with the British destroyers HMS Racehorse (Cdr. J.J. Casement, DSC, RN), HMS Rocket (Lt.Cdr. H.B. Acworth, OBE, RN), HMS Paladin (Lt. E.A.S. Bailey DSC, MBE, RN) and HMS Pathfinder (Lt.Cdr. T.F. Hallifax, RN). (23)

8 Feb 1944
During 8/9 February 1944, HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN), HMS Roebuck (Cdr. J.T. Lean, DSO, RN) and the Australian destroyers HMAS Quiberon (Cdr. G.S. Stewart, RAN) and HMAS Napier (Lt.Cdr. A.H. Green, DSC, RAN) conducted exercises off Trincomalee. (23)

9 Feb 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) returned to Trincomalee.

She departed again later the same day for high speed runs near Trincomalee. During one of these runs Trump hit a submerged object with her propellers.

After Tromp had returned to Trincomalee upon completing her high speed runs a diver was sent down to have a look at the propellers which were found to be damaged. (23)

10 Feb 1944
The battlecruiser HMS Renown (Capt. B.C.B. Brooke, RN and flagship of Vice Admiral A.J. Power, KCB, CVO, RN and second in command of the Eastern Fleet), aircraft carrier HMS Illustrious (Capt. R.L.B. Cunliffe, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral C. Moody, CB, RN), light cruisers HMS Emerald (Capt. F.J. Wylie, RN), HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) and destroyers HMS Rotherham (Capt. F.S.W. de Winton, RN), HMS Racehorse (Cdr. J.J. Casement, DSC, RN), HMS Roebuck (Cdr. J.T. Lean, DSO, RN), HMS Pathfinder (Lt.Cdr. T.F. Hallifax, RN), HMAS Quiberon (Cdr. G.S. Stewart, RAN), HMAS Napier (Lt.Cdr. A.H. Green, DSC, RAN) and HMAS Nizam (Cdr. C.H. Brooks, RAN).

These ships departed Trincomalee and then proceeded to the north-east to give the Japanese the impression that they were to preform a raid against the coast of Burma towards Ramree Island. A fake signal was sent to bolster this. Course was reversed the next day and exercises were then carried out during that day and the next days.

They returned to Trincomalee in the morning of the 14th. Various exercises had been carried out while at sea.

10 Feb 1944

For the daily positions of HrMs Tromp during the period of 10 February 1944 to 14 February 1944, see the map below.

14 Feb 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) returned to Trincomalee. (23)

21 Feb 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Trincomalee for Colombo where she was to dock to repair the damage to her propellers. (23)

22 Feb 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Colombo. (23)

1 Mar 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) is docked at Colombo. (23)

7 Mar 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) is undocked. (23)

8 Mar 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted trials off Colombo. (23)

10 Mar 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Colombo for Trincomalee. (23)

11 Mar 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Trincomalee. (23)

15 Mar 1944
During 15/16 March 1944, HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNethN), HMS Rotherham (Capt. F.S.W. de Winton, RN), HMS Quality (Lt.Cdr. G.L. Farnfield, DSO, RN), HMAS Quickmatch (Lt.Cdr. O.H. Becher, DSC, RAN), HMAS Napier (Lt.Cdr. A.H. Green, DSC, RAN), HMAS Nepal (Cdr. F.B. Morris, RAN), HMAS Norman (Cdr. H.J. Buchanan DSO, RAN), HrMs Van Galen (Lt.Cdr. F.T. Burghard, RNethN) and HrMs Tjerk Hiddes (Lt.Cdr. G.A. Cox, RNethN) conducted exercises off Trincomalee. These included night exercises. (23)

19 Mar 1944

For the daily positions of HrMs Tromp during the period of 19 March 1944 to 2 April 1944, see the map below.

(26)

19 Mar 1944

Operation Diplomat

On 19 March the light cruiser HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNethN) departed Trincomalee to escort the Royal Fleet Auxiliary tankers Arndale (8296 GRT, built 1937), Eaglesdale (8032 GRT, built 1942) and Easedale (8032 GRT, built 1942).

These tankers were to refuel the ships from the Eastern Fleet that were to participate in operation Diplomat. During operation Diplomat the Eastern Fleet proceeded to the south-west of Cocos Island where the aircraft carrier USS Saratoga (Capt. J.H. Cassady, USN) and the destroyers USS Cummings (Cdr. P.D. Williams, USN), USS Dunlap (Cdr. C. Iverson, USN) and USS Fanning (Cdr. R.M. MacKinnon, USN).

Ships from the Eastern Fleet departed Trincomalee on 21 March, these were the battleship HMS Queen Elizabeth (Capt. H.G. Norman, CBE, RN), battlecruiser HMS Renown (Capt. B.C.B. Brooke, RN, flying the flag of Vice Admiral A.J. Power, KCB, CVO, RN and second in command of the Eastern Fleet), aircraft carrier HMS Illustrious (Capt. R.L.B. Cunliffe, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral C. Moody, CB, RN), heavy cruisers HMS London (Capt. R.V. Symonds-Tayler, DSC, RN), HMS Cumberland (Capt. W.Y.La R. Beverley, RN), light cruisers HMS Ceylon (Capt. G.B. Amery-Parkes, RN), HMNZS Gambia (Capt. N.J.W. William-Powlett, DSC, RN), destroyers HMS Quilliam (Capt. R.G. Onslow, DSO and 2 Bars, RN), HMS Pathfinder (Lt.Cdr. T.F. Hallifax, RN), HMAS Napier (Lt.Cdr. A.H. Green, DSC, RAN), HMAS Nepal (Cdr. F.B. Morris, RAN), HMAS Norman (Cdr. H.J. Buchanan DSO, RAN), HrMs Van Galen (Lt.Cdr. F.T. Burghard, RNethN) and HrMs Tjerk Hiddes (Lt.Cdr. G.A. Cox, RNethN).

The battleship HMS Valiant (Capt. G.E.M. O’Donnell, DSO, RN) and the destroyers HMS Quality (Lt.Cdr. G.L. Farnfield, DSO, RN), HMS Queenborough (Cdr. E.P. Hinton, DSO and Bar, MVO, RN), HMAS Quiberon (Cdr. G.S. Stewart, RAN) departed Colombo on the same day. They made rendezvous with the other ships the following day.

On 24 March 1944, the Eastern Fleet met HrMs Tromp and the tankers at 0930 hours in position 07°57'S, 82°14'E and during the next three days they experienced good weather. Ships were fuelled as follows;

24 March 1944
Easedale - HMS Renown
Arndale - HMS Valiant and HMS Ceylon
Eaglesdale - HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMNZS Gambia

25 March 1944
Easedale - HMS Quilliam, HMS Queenborough, HMAS Quiberon, HMS Quality and HMS Pathfinder
Arndale - HMS Illustrious and HrMs Tromp
Eaglesdale - HMS London, HMS Cumberland, HMAS Napier, HMAS Nepal and HMAS Norman

26 March 1944
Easedale - HMS Pathfinder, HrMs Van Galen, HMAS Quiberon and HMAS Norman
Eaglesdale - HMAS Napier, HMS Quilliam, HMS Queensborough, HMS Quality and HMAS Nepal

Tanker Arndale had been detached after fuelling on the 25th escorted by HrMS Tjerk Hiddes which was suffering from defects. The other two oilers were detached after fuelling on the 26th still escorted by HrMs Tromp.

HrMs Ceylon and HMS Napier arrived at Colombo on 31 March. All the other ships arrived at Trincomalee on the same day except HrMs Tromp which arrived at Trincomalee with the tankers on 2 April. (26)

2 Apr 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) returned to Trincomalee. (23)

11 Apr 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted A/S exercises together with HMS Taurus (Lt.Cdr. M.R.G. Wingfield, DSO, DSC and Bar, RN).

Later the same day (actually until 0700/12) HrMs Tromp carried out exercises together with the British heavy cruisers HMS London (Capt. R.V. Symonds-Tayler, DSC, RN), HMS Cumberland (Capt. F.J. Butler, RN) and the British light cruisers HMS Newcastle (Capt. P.B.R.W. William-Powlett, DSO, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral A.D. Read, CB, RN), HMS Nigeria (Capt. S.H. Paton, RN) and the New Zealand light cruiser HMNZS Gambia (Capt. N.J.W. William-Powlett, DSC, RN). (23)

12 Apr 1944
After completing exercises off Trincomalee, HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN), returned to that harbour. (23)

16 Apr 1944

Operation Cockpit

Carrier raid against Sabang by the Eastern Fleet.

On 16 April 1944 the Eastern Fleet put to sea from Trincomalee, Ceylon in two task forces;
Task Force 69, which was made up of the battleships HMS Queen Elizabeth (Capt. H.G. Norman, CBE, RN, flying the flag of Admiral J.F. Somerville, KCB, KBE, DSO, RN, C-in-C Eastern Fleet), HMS Valiant (Capt. G.E.M. O’Donnell, DSO, RN), Richelieu (Capt. Lambert), the light cruisers HMS Newcastle (Capt. P.B.R.W. William-Powlett, DSO, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral A.D. Read, CB, RN), HMS Nigeria (Capt. S.H. Paton, RN), HMS Ceylon (Capt. G.B. Amery-Parkes, RN), HMNZS Gambia (Capt. N.J.W. William-Powlett, DSC, RN), HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) and the destroyers HMS Rotherham (Capt. F.S.W. de Winton, RN), HMS Racehorse (Cdr. J.J. Casement, DSC, RN), HMS Penn (Lt.Cdr. J.H. Swain, DSO, DSC, RN), HMS Petard (Lt.Cdr. R.C. Egan, DSO, RN), HMAS Quiberon (Cdr. G.S. Stewart, RAN), HMAS Napier (Lt.Cdr. A.H. Green, DSC, RAN, with Commodore S.H.T. Arliss, DSO, RN, on board), HMAS Nepal (Lt.Cdr. J. Plunkett-Cole, RAN), HMAS Nizam (Cdr. C.H. Brooks, RAN), HrMs Van Galen (Lt.Cdr. F.T. Burghard, RNN).

Task Force 70, which was made up of the battlecruiser HMS Renown (Capt. B.C.B. Brooke, RN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral A.J. Power, KCB, CVO, RN, second in command of the Eastern Fleet), the British aircraft carriers HMS Illustrious (Capt. R.L.B. Cunliffe, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral C. Moody, CB, RN), USS Saratoga (Capt. J.H. Cassady, USN), heavy cruiser HMS London (Capt. R.V. Symonds-Tayler, DSC, RN) and the destroyers HMS Quilliam (Capt. R.G. Onslow, DSO and 2 Bars, RN), HMS Quadrant (Lt.Cdr. W.H. Farrington, RN), HMS Queenborough (Cdr. E.P. Hinton, DSO and Bar, MVO, RN), USS Cummings (Cdr. P.D. Williams, USN), USS Dunlap (Cdr. C. Iverson, USN) and USS Fanning (Lt.Cdr. J.C. Bentley, USN).

During the forenoon of the 17th the four 'N' class and two 'P' class destroyers of Force 69 were fuelled by HMS Newcastle, HMS Nigeria, HMS Ceylon, HMNZS Gambia. The three 'Q' class destroyers from Force 70 were fuelled by HMS Renown and HMS London.

On the 18th HMS Ceylon and HMNZS Gambia were transferred from Force 69 to Force 70 to bolster the latters AA defence. (On the 19th HMS Nigeria replaced HMS Ceylon in this force as HMS Ceylon had problems with one shaft and could only make 24 knots.) At sunset Force 70 was detached so as to arrive at the flying off position for the aircraft at 0530/19.

At 0530/19 the carriers launched 46 bombers and 37 fighters (17 Barracudas and 13 Corsairs from HMS Illustrious and 11 Avenges, 18 Dauntless and 24 Hellcats from USS Saratoga) to attack Sabang and nearby airfields. Besides that 12 fighters were launched to patrol overhead of both Task forces.

The enemy was taken completely by surprise and 24 Japanese aircraft were destroyed on the ground. Only 1 fighter, a Hellcat from the Saratoga, was lost on the Allied side and it's pilot was rescued out of the water by the British submarine HMS Tactician (Lt.Cdr. A.F. Collett, DSC, RN). All aircraft, except the one lost, had returned to the carriers by 0930 hours after which both task forces retired to the west. The Japanese tried to attack the Allied task force with three torpedo bombers but these were shot down by Allied fighter aircraft at 1010 hours.

At Sabang the Japanese merchants Kunitsu Maru (2722 GRT, built 1937) and Haruno Maru (775 GRT, built 1927, former Dutch Kidoel) were sunk by the Allied aircraft while the Japanese minelayer Hatsutaka was damaged.

At 0800 hours on the 20th the fleet set course to return to Trincomalee. The cruisers and destroyer meanwhile carried out attack exercises.

The fleet returned to Trincomalee on 21 April. (27)

16 Apr 1944

For the daily positions of HrMs Tromp during the period of 16 April 1944 to 21 April 1944, see the map below.

(27)

21 Apr 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) returned to Trincomalee. (23)

24 Apr 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted A/S exercises off Trincomalee together with HMS Templar (Lt. T.G. Ridgeway, RN).

Later the same day (actually until the morning of the next day) HrMs Tromp carried out exercises together with HMS London (Capt. R.V. Symonds-Tayler, DSC, RN), HMS Nigeria (Capt. S.H. Paton, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral A.D. Read, CB, RN) and HMNZS Gambia (Capt. N.J.W. William-Powlett, DSC, RN) which were also out exercising during 24/25 April 1944. These included night exercises. (28)

25 Apr 1944
After completing exercises off Trincomalee, HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN), returned to that harbour. (23)

4 May 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted gunnery and A/S exercises off Trincomalee. The A/S exercises were together with the British submarine HMS Storm (T/Lt. E.P. Young, DSC, RNVR). (23)

6 May 1944

For the daily positions of HrMs Tromp during the period of 6 May 1944 to 27 May 1944, see the map below.

(29)

6 May 1944

Operation Transom.

Carrier raid against Surabaya by the Eastern Fleet.

On 6 May 1944 the Eastern Fleet put to sea from Trincomalee or Colombo in two task forces;
Task Force 65, which was made up of the battleships HMS Queen Elizabeth (Capt. H.G. Norman, CBE, RN, flying the flag of Admiral J.F. Somerville, KCB, KBE, DSO, RN, C-in-C Eastern Fleet), HMS Valiant (Capt. G.E.M. O’Donnell, DSO, RN), Richelieu (Capt. G.M.J. Merveilleux du Vignaux), the light cruisers HMS Kenya (Capt. C.L. Robertson, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral A.D. Read, CB, RN), HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) and the destroyers HMS Rotherham (Capt. F.S.W. de Winton, RN), HMS Racehorse (Cdr. J.J. Casement, DSC, RN), HMS Penn (Lt.Cdr. J.H. Swain, DSO, DSC, RN), HMAS Napier (Lt.Cdr. A.H. Green, DSC, RAN, with Commodore S.H.T. Arliss, DSO, RN, on board), HMAS Nepal (Lt.Cdr. J. Plunkett-Cole, RAN), HMAS Quiberon (Cdr. G.S. Stewart, RAN), HMAS Quickmatch (Lt.Cdr. O.H. Becher, DSC, RAN) and HrMs Van Galen (Lt.Cdr. F.T. Burghard, RNN).

Task Force 66, which was made up of the battlecruiser HMS Renown (Capt. B.C.B. Brooke, RN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral A.J. Power, KCB, CVO, RN, second in command of the Eastern Fleet) (went to Task Force 65 the next day), the aircraft carriers HMS Illustrious (Capt. R.L.B. Cunliffe, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral C. Moody, CB, RN), USS Saratoga (Capt. J.H. Cassady, USN), light cruisers HMS Ceylon (Capt. G.B. Amery-Parkes, RN), HMNZS Gambia (Capt. N.J.W. William-Powlett, DSC, RN) and the destroyers HMS Quilliam (Capt. R.G. Onslow, DSO and 2 Bars, RN), HMS Quadrant (Lt.Cdr. W.H. Farrington, RN), HMS Queenborough (Cdr. E.P. Hinton, DSO and Bar, MVO, RN), USS Cummings (Cdr. P.D. Williams, USN), USS Dunlap (Cdr. C. Iverson, USN) and USS Fanning (Lt.Cdr. J.C. Bentley, USN).

On 10 May 1944, the Dutch light cruiser Tromp and the destroyers were fuelled at sea by the capital ships and the cruisers. During fuelling from HMS Valiant the Dutch destroyer HrMs Van Galen sustained some minor damage (fractured hull plate on her port side) but the crew of the Van Galen was able to effect emergency repairs.

On 15 May 1944, task forces 65 and 66 were fuelled at Exmouth Gulf, Australia by Task Force 67 which was made up of of six Royal Fleet Auxiliary tankers; Eaglesdale (8032 GRT, built 1942), Echodale (8150 GRT, built 1941), Easedale (8032 GRT, built 1942), Arndale (8296 GRT, built 1937), Pearleaf (5911 GRT, built 1917), Appleleaf (5891 GRT, built 1917) and supplyship (used as distilling ship) Bacchus (3154 GRT, built 1936). This force had already left Trincomalee on 30 April and was escorted by the heavy cruisers HMS London (Capt. R.V. Symonds-Tayler, DSC, RN), HMS Suffolk (A/Capt. W.F.H.C. Rutherford, RN). They had also been escorted near Ceylon by a local escort for A/S purposes, this local escort had been made up of the destroyers HMS Rotherham, HrMs Van Galen and the frigate HMS Findhorn (Lt.Cdr. J.C. Dawson, RD, RNR). The local escort returned to Ceylon on 5 May 1944. The two cruisers mentioned above now joined Task Force 66. Later this day Task Forces 65 and 66 went to sea again for the actual attack on Surabaya. On leaving Exmouth Gulf the fleet was spotted by the merchant vessel Aroona. This ship was now instructed to put into Exmouth Gulf and was held there by HMAS Adelaide (A/Capt. J.C.D. Esdale, OBE, RAN) for 24 hours and to impress on the master and crew of this vessel the necessity of not disclosing any information concerning the Fleet on the arrival of their ship at Fremantle (their next port of call).

In the early morning hours of the 17th the carriers launched 45 dive bombers and 40 fighters for an attack on the harbour and oil installations (Wonokromo oil refeniry) of Surabaya, Netherlands East Indies. (USS Saratoga: 12 Avengers (1 had to return with engine trouble shortly after being launched), 18 Dauntless, 24 Hellcats; HMS Illustrious: 18 Avengers (2 of which force landed in the sea shortly after being launched), 16 Corsairs). On the ground they destroyed 12 enemy aircraft (20 were claimed). The damage to the harbour and shipping were over estimated (10 ships were thought to have been hit) as in fact only the small transport ship Shinrei Maru (987 GRT, built 1918) was sunk and patrol vessel P 36, auxiliary submarine chasers CHa-107 and CHa-108, tanker Yosei Maru (2594 GRT, built 1928, former Dutch Josefina) and cargo ships Choka Maru (???? GRT, built ????) and Tencho Maru (2716 GRT, built 1919) were damaged.

On the 18th the US ships were released. The other ships then proceeded to Exmouth Gulf where they arrived to fuel the next day before starting on the return trip to Ceylon less destroyer HMAS Quiberon which was to refit in Australia and was sent to Fremantle.

On 23 May 1944, the Dutch light cruiser Tromp and the destroyers were fuelled at sea by the capital ships and the cruisers.

The ships of Task Force 65 and 66 arrived back at Colombo or Trincomalee on the 26 or 27th.

On 1 June 1944, Task Force 67 arrived at Trincomalee from Exmouth Gulf having been escorted by HMS London and HMS Suffolk until 1700FG/31. On arrival at Trincomalee Task Force 67 had an A/S escort made up of the destroyers HMAS Nizam (Cdr. C.H. Brooks, RAN), HMAS Quickmatch, HMS Raider (Lt.Cdr. K.W. Michell, DSC, RN), HMS Roebuck (Cdr. J.T. Lean, DSO, RN) and corvette HMS Burnet (Lt. D.S. Charles, RNR). These ships had joined at 2300FG/28 (HMAS Nizam, HMS Roebuck and HMS Burnet) and 0630FG/30 (HMAS Quickmatch and HMS Raider).

During this operation several US Submarine guarded the passages to the Indian Ocean to spot a possible Japanese counter attack. The submarines deployed for this purpose were the following; In the Sunda Strait from 12 to 23 May 1944; USS Angler (Cdr. R. I. Olsen, USN) and USS Gunnel (Cdr. J.S. McCain, Jr., USN).
South of Lombok Strait from 13 to 20 May 1944; USS Cabrilla (Cdr. W.C. Thompson, Jr., USN) and also the USS Bluefish (Cdr. C.M. Henderson, USN) from 13 May until the night of the 16th.
South of Bali Strait from 17 to 20 May; USS Bluefish.
North of Bali Strait; USS Puffer (Cdr. F.G. Selby, USN) during the night of 16/17 May.

The following US Submarines were deployed in the Surabaya area for air/sea rescue duties; USS Puffer in the Madura Strait about 40 miles to the east of Surabaya.
USS Rasher (Cdr. W.R. Laughton, USN) in the Java Sea about 40 miles to the north of Surabaya. (29)

27 May 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) returned to Trincomalee. (23)

5 Jun 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Trincomalee for Colombo. (23)

6 Jun 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Colombo. (23)

16 Jun 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Colombo for Trincomalee. (23)

17 Jun 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Trincomalee. (23)

23 Jun 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted exercises, including A/S exercises, off Trincomalee together with the British destroyer HMS Petard (Lt.Cdr. R.C. Egan, DSO, DSC, RN) and the British submarine HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO and Bar, DSC, RN). The exercises with HMS Petard were completed at 0600/24 and then HrMs Tromp returned to Trincomalee. (30)

29 Jun 1944
During 29/30 June 1944 HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) was exercises off Trincomalee. Amonst the exercises were A/S exercises with the British submarine HMS Telemachus (Cdr. W.D.A. King, DSO, DSC, RN) and the British destroyer HMS Rotherham (Capt. F.S.W. de Winton, RN). (31)

4 Jul 1944
During 4/5 July 1944, HMS Nigeria (Capt. H.A. King, DSO, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral A.D. Read, CB, RN), HMS Kenya (Capt. C.L. Robertson, RN), HMNZS Gambia (Capt. N.J.W. William-Powlett, DSC, RN), HMS Phoebe (Capt. S.M. Raw, CBE, RN) and HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN). Later the destroyers HMS Rotherham (Capt. F.S.W. de Winton, RN), HMS Relentless (Lt.Cdr. R.A. Fell, RN), HMS Rapid (Lt.Cdr. M.W. Tomkinson, DSC and Bar, RN) and HMS Quality (Lt.Cdr. the Viscount Jocelyn, RN) also joined.

The exercises included night exercises.

On completion of the exercises, HMS Kenya set course to proceed to Colombo. (31)

5 Jul 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) returned to Trincomalee upon completion of the exercises. (31)

11 Jul 1944
During 11/12 July 1944, HMS Cumberland (Capt. W.Y.La R. Beverley, RN) and HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted exercises off Trincomalee. These included night exercises. (32)

19 Jul 1944
During 19/20 July 1944, HMS Nigeria (Capt. H.A. King, DSO, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral A.D. Read, CB, RN), HMS Kenya (Capt. C.L. Robertson, RN), HMS Ceylon (Capt. G.B. Amery-Parkes, RN), HMNZS Gambia (Capt. N.J.W. William-Powlett, DSC, RN) and HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN), all conducted exercises off Trincomalee. These included night exercises. (31)

22 Jul 1944

Operation Crimson.

Carrier raid and surface bombardment against Sabang, Netherlands East Indies by the Eastern Fleet.

On 22 July 1944 the Eastern Fleet put to sea from Trincomalee, Ceylon. The ships that participated in this sortie were the battleships HMS Queen Elizabeth (Capt. H.G. Norman, CBE, RN, flying the flag of Admiral J.F. Somerville, KCB, KBE, DSO, RN, C-in-C Eastern Fleet), HMS Valiant (Capt. G.E.M. O’Donnell, DSO, RN), Richelieu (Capt. G.M.J. Merveilleux du Vignaux), battlecruiser HMS Renown (Capt. B.C.B. Brooke, RN, flying the flag of Vice Admiral A.J. Power, KCB, CVO, RN, second in command of the Eastern Fleet), aircraft carriers HMS Illustrious (Capt. C.E. Lambe, CB, CVO, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral C. Moody, CB, RN), HMS Victorious (Capt. M.M. Denny, CB, CBE, RN), heavy cruiser HMS Cumberland (Capt. W.Y.La R. Beverley, RN), light cruisers HMS Nigeria (Capt. H.A. King, DSO, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral A.D. Read, CB, RN), HMS Kenya (Capt. C.L. Robertson, RN), HMS Ceylon (Capt. G.B. Amery-Parkes, RN), HMS Phoebe (Capt. S.M. Raw, CBE, RN), HMNZS Gambia (Capt. N.J.W. William-Powlett, DSC, RN), HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) and the destroyers HMS Rotherham (Capt. F.S.W. de Winton, RN), HMS Relentless (Lt.Cdr. R.A. Fell, RN), HMS Racehorse (Cdr. J.J. Casement, DSC, RN), HMS Rocket (Lt.Cdr. H.B. Acworth, OBE, RN), HMS Raider (Lt.Cdr. K.W. Michell, DSC, RN), HMS Roebuck (Cdr. J.T. Lean, DSO, RN), HMS Rapid (Lt.Cdr. M.W. Tomkinson, DSC and Bar, RN), HMS Quilliam (Capt. R.G. Onslow, DSO and 2 Bars, RN), HMS Quality (Lt.Cdr. the Viscount Jocelyn, RN), HMAS Quickmatch (Lt.Cdr. O.H. Becher, DSC, RAN).

The British submarines HMS Templar (Lt. T.G. Ridgeway, RN) and HMS Tantalus (Lt.Cdr. H.S. Mackenzie, DSO and Bar, RN) were deployed for air/sea rescue duties.

In the early hours of the 25th the carriers, HMS Illustrious and HMS Victorious, separated from the fleet under the escort of HMS Phoebe, HMS Roebuck and HMS Raider, and launched a total of 34 fighter aircraft to attack airfields in the area (18 Corsairs from HMS Illustrious and 16 Corsairs from HMS Victorious). One Corsair fighter was damaged by AA fire from the enemy and crashed into the sea, the pilot was picked up by HMS Nigeria. Five other Corsairs were damaged by AA fire but managed to return to the carriers. Two of these could be repaired on board, the other three were too badly damaged for effective repairs.

The battleships HMS Queen Elizabeth, HMS Valiant, Richelieu, battlecruiser HMS Renown, heavy cruiser HMS Cumberland, light cruisers HMS Nigeria, HMS Kenya, HMS Ceylon, HMNZS Gambia and the destroyers HMS Rotherham, HMS Relentless, HMS Racehorse, HMS Rocket and HMS Rapid then commenced a bombardment of the Sabang area. They fired a total of 294 - 15", 134 - 8", 324 - 6", ca. 500 - 4.7" and 123 - 4" shells.

Then the Dutch cruiser HrMs Tromp entered Sabang Bay, her rightful waters, with the destroyers HMS Quilliam, HMS Quality and HMAS Quickmatch. In all these four ships fired a total of 8 Torpedos and 208 - 6", 717 - 4.'7" and 668 x 4" shells. Japanese shore batteries obtained 4 hits on the Tromp while Quilliam and Quality were both hit once. The hit by what was thought to be a 3” shell on Quilliam caused minor structural damage but killed one petty officer and wounded four ratings. Quality was hit by what is thought to be a 5” shell which hit the tripod foremast and HA director. One war correspondent was killed and one officer and eight retings were wounded, some of them seriously. Tromp was hit by two 5” and two 3” shells but was lucky that none of these exploded !!!, she suffered only minor structural damage and no deaths or even wounded amongst her crew !

Later that day 13 fighters from the carriers intercepted a Japanese counter attack with 10 aircraft. 7 of these were shot down for no losses of their own.

The fleet arrived back at Trincomalee on 27 July. (33)

22 Jul 1944

For the daily positions of HrMs Tromp during the period of 22 July 1944 to 27 July 1944, see the map below.

(33)

27 Jul 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) returned to Trincomalee. (31)

17 Aug 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Trincomalee as escort for the British Royal Fleet Auxiliary tanker Easedale (8032 GRT, built 1942).

This tanker was put to sea to refuel the ships that were to participate in the upcoming operation 'Banquet'.

For the daily positions of HrMs Tromp during the period of 19 August 1944 to 27 August 1944, see the map below.

(31)

19 Aug 1944

Operation Banquet.

Carrier raid against Padang, Sumatra, Netherlands East Indies by ships of the Eastern Fleet.

On 19 August 1944 ships from the Eastern Fleet put to sea from Trincomalee, Ceylon. ' Force 64 ' was made up of the following ships; Aircraft carriers HMS Victorious (Capt. M.M. Denny, CB, CBE, RN), HMS Indomitable (Capt. J.A.S. Eccles, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral C. Moody, CB, RN), battleship HMS Howe (Capt. H.W.U. McCall, DSO, RN), light cruisers HMS Ceylon (Capt. G.B. Amery-Parkes, RN), HMS Kenya (Capt. C.L. Robertson, RN) and the destroyers HMS Rotherham (Capt. H.W. Biggs, DSO, RN), HMS Raider (Lt.Cdr. K.W. Michell, DSC, RN), HMS Redoubt (Lt.Cdr. N.E.G. Ropner, DSO, RN), HMS Rapid (Lt.Cdr. M.W. Tomkinson, DSC and Bar, RN) and HMS Rocket (Lt.Cdr. H.B. Acworth, OBE, RN).

On the 17th ' Force 67 ' made up of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary tanker Easedale (8032 GRT, built 1942) escorted by the light cruiser HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) had already gone to sea to be in a position to refuel ships from ' Force 64 ' on the 22th.

The submarine HMS Severn (Lt. R.H. Bull, DSC, RN) was in the area for air/sea rescue duties.

On the 24th the carriers launched aircraft to attack Padang. They claimed to have sunk a transport and to have damaged two more transports.

Three aircraft were lost. One on take off, one during the action and one one landing.

' Force 64 ' returned to Trincomalee on 27 August 1944. (34)

27 Aug 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) returned to Trincomalee. (31)

28 Aug 1944
During 28/29 August 1944, the heavy cruiser HMS Cumberland (Capt. P.K. Enright, RN) and the light cruisers HMNZS Gambia (Capt. N.J.W. William-Powlett, DSC, RN) and HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted exercises off Trincomalee. During the first part of the exercises the light cruisers HMS Kenya (Capt. C.L. Robertson, RN), HMS Ceylon (Capt. G.B. Amery-Parkes, RN) were also present but they parted company around midnight during the night of 28/29 August to proceed to Colombo and Durban respectively. Later the battlecruiser HMS Renown (Capt. B.C.B. Brooke, RN, flying the flag of Vice Admiral A.J. Power, KCB, CVO, RN, second in command of the Eastern Fleet) and the destroyers HMS Quilliam (Capt. R.G. Onslow, DSO and 2 Bars, RN), HMAS Quickmatch (Lt.Cdr. O.H. Becher, DSC, RAN) and HMAS Norman (Cdr. H.J. Buchanan DSO, RAN) also joined. (31)

29 Aug 1944
Upon completion of the exercises, HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN), returned to Trincomalee. (31)

1 Sep 1944
Around 0800FG/1, the destroyers HMS Quilliam (Capt. R.G. Onslow, DSO and 2 Bars, RN), HMAS Quickmatch (Lt.Cdr. O.H. Becher, DSC, RAN) and HrMs Tjerk Hiddes (Lt.Cdr. N.W. Sluijter, RNethN) departed Trincomalee for exercises. In the afternoon and evening they conducted A/S exercises with the submarine HMS Trenchant (Lt.Cdr. A.R. Hezlet, DSC, RN).

Around 1145FG/1, the light cruiser HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNethN) departed the harbour for exercises.

Around 1345FG/1, the destroyer HMS Redoubt (Lt.Cdr. N.E.G. Ropner, DSO, RN) departed the harbour for exercises.

Around 1815FG/1, the destroyer HMS Rotherham (Capt. H.W. Biggs, DSO, RN) departed the harbour for exercises.

HrMs Tromp returned to harbour around 0850FG/2.

HMS Quilliam and HMAS Quickmatch returned to harbour around 1030FG/2.

HMS Rotherham, HMS Redoubt and HrMs Tjerk Hiddes were joined by the battleship Richelieu (Capt. G.M.J. Merveilleux du Vignaux) around 1000FG/2. They entered harbour around 1630FG/2. (35)

2 Sep 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) returned to Trincomalee. She departed for Colombo later the same day. (31)

3 Sep 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Colombo. (31)

14 Sep 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Colombo for Trincomalee. (31)

15 Sep 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Trincomalee. (31)

21 Sep 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted exercises off Trincomalee. (31)

22 Sep 1944
During 22/23 September 1944, HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN), conducted exercises off Trincomalee. (31)

25 Sep 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Trincomalee for Fremantle, Australia.

For the daily positions during the period of 25 September 1944 to 14 October 1944, see the map below.

(31)

5 Oct 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Fremantle. (31)

8 Oct 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Fremantle for Sydney. (31)

14 Oct 1944
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Sydney. (31)

17 Jan 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) is docked at the Cockatoo Island Dockyard. (31)

26 Jan 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) is undocked. (31)

17 Feb 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) is fumigated at Sydney. This completed her refit. (31)

24 Feb 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Sydney for Melbourne. (31)

25 Feb 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Melbourne. (31)

28 Feb 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted exercises off Melbourne. Later the same day she departed for Fremantle.

For the daily positions during the period of 28 February 1945 to 14 March 1945, see the map below.

(31)

4 Mar 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Fremantle. (31)

6 Mar 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Fremantle for Trincomalee. (31)

14 Mar 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Trincomalee. (31)

21 Mar 1945
During 21/22 March 1945, HMS London (Capt. S.L. Bateson, RN), HMS Newcastle (Capt. J.G. Roper, OBE, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral W.R. Patterson, CB, CVO, RN), HMS Ceylon (Capt. G.B. Amery-Parkes, RN) and HMS Kenya (Capt. C.L. Robertson, RN) and HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted exercises off Trincomalee. The cruisers were later joined by three destroyers. (31)

22 Mar 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) returned to Trincomalee. (31)

27 Mar 1945
During 27/28 March 1945 the battleship Richelieu (Capt. G.M.J. Merveilleux du Vignaux), heavy cruiser HMS London (Capt. S.L. Bateson, RN), light cruisers HMS Ceylon (Capt. G.B. Amery-Parkes, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral W.R. Patterson, CB, CVO, RN) and HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted exercises off Trincomalee. (31)

5 Apr 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted exercises off Trincomalee. (31)

11 Apr 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Trincomalee for Colombo. (31)

12 Apr 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Colombo where she was docked later the same day. (31)

20 Apr 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) was undocked and immediately departed Colombo for Trincomalee. (31)

21 Apr 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Trincomalee. (31)

27 Apr 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted exercises off Trincomalee together with the British heavy cruiser HMS Suffolk (Capt. D. Gilmour, RN). Upon completion of these exercises HrMs Tromp and HMS Suffolk both joined Task Force 63.

For the daily positions of HrMs Tromp during the period of 27 April 1945 to 9 May 1945, see the map below.

(36)

27 Apr 1945

Operation Bishop.

Carrier raid and surface bombardment of Car Nicobar and Port Blair and to provide cover for Operation Dracula which are amphibious landings off Rangoon, Burma.

On 27 April 1945 ships from the Eastern Fleet put to sea from Trincomalee, Ceylon for operation Bishop. These ships formed Task ' Force 63 '. This task force was, at that moment, made up of the following ships: battleships HMS Queen Elizabeth (Capt. R.M. Ellis, DSO, RN, flying the flag of Vice Admiral H.C.T. Walker, CB, RN), Richelieu (Capt. G.M.J. Merveilleux du Vignaux), escort carriers HMS Shah (Capt. W.J. Yendell, RN), HMS Empress (Capt. J.R.S. Brown, RN), heavy cruisers HMS Cumberland (Capt. P.K. Enright, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral W.R. Patterson, CB, CVO, RN), HMS Suffolk (Capt. D. Gilmour, RN), light cruisers HMS Ceylon (Capt. G.B. Amery-Parkes, RN), HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) and the destroyers HMS Rotherham (Capt. H.W. Biggs, DSO and Bar, RN), HMS Tartar (Capt. B. Jones, DSO and Bar, DSC, RN) and HMS Penn (Lt.Cdr. A.H. Diack, DSC and Bar, RN). Two more destroyers were sent out to join this task force later; HMS Nubian (Lt.Cdr. F.C. Brodrick, RN) and HMS Verulam (Lt.Cdr. D.H.R. Bromley, DSC, RN). These two destroyers actually joined on the 29th.

An oiling force (Task Force 69), made up of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary tankers Olwen (6470 GRT, built 1917) and Easedale (8032 GRT, built 1942) escorted by the destroyer HMS Paladin (Lt. H.R. Hewlett, RN) had departed Trinomalee on the 26th. HrMs Tromp and the destroyers were fuelled from this force on the 29th.

At dawn on the 30th air attacks were carried out against Car Nicobar followed by a bombardment of the airfields At 0600/30, HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Cumberland opened fire on the southern and northern airfields respectively from a range of 18000 yards Both ships soon found the range and it was not possible for any aircraft to take off after the bombardment. HMS Suffolk and HMS Ceylon then bombarded enemy AA positions. Shortly after sunrise around 0700 hours the destroyers HMS Rotherham, HMS Nubian and HMS Verulam started to bombard the settlement of Malacca. Soon afterwards a large fire, thought to be petrol, was seen near the jetty and another on one the southern airfield. At 0710 hours cease fire was ordered and a fighter strike was then commenced. They dropped bombs on and then strafed the airfields. At 0735 hours, after the fighter strike was over, the battleshios HMS Queen Elizabeth and Richelieu opened fire to crater the runways. They continued to fire on the runways until 0805 and 0809 respectively. Capt. (D) 11th destroyer flotilla on board HMS Rotherham meanwhile reported that the jetty at Malacca had been severly damaged and that two steam coasters and five small vessels had been destroyed.

At 1530/30, Richelieu, HMS Cumberland and HMS Rotherham were sent ahead to bombard Port Blair while on a northerly course. At 1730 hours Richelieu opened fire on the southern airfield and Cumberland on a coastal battery. Both firings were spotted by Hellcat fighters from the escort carriers. Later HMS Rotherham also engaged coastal batteries but from a closer range. Around 1835 hours these ships completed their bombardment but then HMS Queen Elizabeth, HMS Suffolk, HrMs Tromp, HMS Tartar and HMS Penn took over. Queen Elizabeth engaged the airfields while Suffolk worked over the marine yards with the same aircraft that had spotted for Richelieu and Cumberland. The other three ships engaged shore batteries. By the time the bombardment ceased after about 40 minutes the airfields were well cratered and hits were obtained on a lot of other targets. After the bombardment HrMs Tromp reported that she had seven wounded, two seriously (they both died later) from two near misses, at least that was thought at that moment. Later investigation however showed that the explosion was caused by American manufactured defective ammunition and not by enemy fire. Both bombarding forces then retired to the south an re-joined the escort carriers which had provided them with fighter cover during their bombardments.

During the night all ships proceeded southwards so as to bombard Car Nicobar a second time at dawn. At 0720/1 HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Suffolk opened fire on their target. After cratering the northern airfield Queen Elizabeth shifted target to the southern airfield at 0741 hours and carried out yet another effective shoot. At 0755 hours both ships ceased fire. HMS Cumberland and HMS Ceylon then took over. The French battleship Richelieu however did not participate in the bombardment this time as she had already expended her ammunition allowance. Cumberland enganged targets at/near the northern airfield and HMS Ceylon did the same working over the southern airfield. HMS Tartar was sent ahead to bombard the jetty at and targets in the village of Malacca. At 0915 hours all ships were again in one force and course was set to the north to conduct another bombardment of Port Blair but this time approaching from the north.

At 0800/2 HMS Queen Elizabeth opened fire on the runways of the airports and HMS Suffolk on coastal batteries. Again considerable damage was done to the airports and also a large petrol fire was started at one of them. At 0845 hours Richelieu (firing 6” from her secondary armament at the marine jetty) and HMS Cumberland took over. HMS Rotherham was ordered to take out an AA battery that was firing at the spotter aircraft and in this she succeded.

In the afternoon a signal was received that the landing off Rangoon had been successful and without opposition. The force now retired to the north-east for her cover position during operation Dracula.

On 4 May rendes-vous was again made with the oiling force and all ships were fueled by the Olwen. HMS Penn then remained with the Olwen while HMS Paladin joined Task Force 64.

On 6 May bombardments and air strikes were again carried out in the Port Blair area. As of 0700/6 HMS Empress started to launch fourteen Hellcats while HMS Shah launched eight Avengers and four Hellcats. At 0800 hours, HMS Queen Elizabeth, HMS Suffolk, HrMs Tromp and HMS Paladin opened fire on AA and coastal batteries in the vicinity of Phoenix Harbour, Hopetown Island and Ross Island in order to neutralise these defences for the air strike. At 0814 hours the air strike leaded ordered cease fire and a few minutes later the aircraft started attacking shipping inside Port Blair harbour. One aircraft was hit by enemy AA fire and failed to return to it’s carrier. HMS Tartar made a search for it but was unable to locate the aircraft or it’s pilot.

At 1730/6 HMS Queen Elizabeth bombarded a 6” gun known to be at Stewart Sound. The bombardment was completed at 1809 hours. HMS Suffolk meanwhile bombarded a pillbox on Sound Island with her 4” armament and appeared to have set the target on fire.

On 7 May another air attack was made on Car Nicobar by the carriers with a total of 10 Hellcats. With this air attack over course was set to return to Trincomalee.

A part of Task Force 63 returned to Trincomalee on 7 May, these were Richelieu, HMS Cumberland, HMS Ceylon, most likely escorted by HMS Rotherham, HMS Verulam and HMS Penn.

The other ships returned on 9 May. (36)

10 May 1945

For the daily positions of HrMs Tromp during the period of 10 May 1945 to 18 May 1945, see the map below.

(37)

10 May 1945

Operation Dukedom.

Intercepting Japanese surface ships trying to evacuate troops from the Andaman Islands.

On 8 May 1945 a report was received from two British submarines on patrol in the Malacca Strait (HMS Statesman (Lt. R.G.P. Bulkeley, RN) and HMS Subtle (Lt. B.J.B. Andrew, DSC, RN) that they had sighted a Japanese heavy cruiser and a destroyer proceeding to the north-west. The Eastern Fleet was already on alert due to intelligence and ships from the Eastern Fleet immediately (around 0700 hours) put to sea from Trincomalee, Ceylon for operation Dukedom. These ships formed Task Force 61. This task force was, at that moment, made up of the following ships;
British battleship HMS Queen Elizabeth (Capt. R.M. Ellis, DSO, RN, flying the flag of Vice Admiral H.C.T. Walker, CB, RN), the French battleship Richelieu (Capt. G.M.J. Merveilleux du Vignaux), the British escort carriers HMS Hunter (Capt. A.D. Torlesse, RN), HMS Khedive (A/Capt. D.H. Magnay, RN), HMS Shah (Capt. W.J. Yendell, RN), HMS Emperor (Capt. Sir C. Madden, RN), the British heavy cruiser HMS Cumberland (Capt. P.K. Enright, RN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral W.R. Patterson, CB, CVO, RN), the British light cruiser HMS Royalist (Capt. W.G. Brittain, CBE, RN, flying the flag of Commodore N.G. Oliver, CB, DSO and 2 Bars, RN), the Dutch light cruiser HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) and the British destroyers HMS Saumarez (Capt. M.L. Power, CBE, DSO and Bar, RN), HMS Venus (Cdr. H.G.D. De Chair, DSC with Bar, RN), HMS Vigilant (Lt.Cdr. L.W.L. Argles, DSC, RN), HMS Virago (Lt.Cdr. A.J.R. White, DSC, RN), HMS Rotherham (Capt. H.W. Biggs, DSO and Bar, RN), HMS Nubian (Lt.Cdr. F.C. Brodrick, RN) and HMS Penn (Lt.Cdr. A.H. Diack, DSC and Bar, RN). This latter destroyer however had to return due to defects.

The British destroyer HMS Verulam (Lt.Cdr. D.H.R. Bromley, DSC, RN) sailed at 1700 hours to overtake and then join the Task Force. She was joined by HMS Tartar (Capt. B. Jones, DSO and Bar, DSC, RN) as substitute for HMS Penn whose defects could not be repaired in time. HMS Verulam and HMS Tartar eventually joined the Task Force at 1505/11.

Most ships of the Task Force had only returned from the previous operation the day before and for instance HMS Queen Elizabeth had only 50% ammunition for her 15” guns on board. Also HMS Emperor and HMS Khedive were not fully fueled.

The same day the tanker Easedale (8032 GRT, built 1942) departed Trincomalee escorted by the British destroyer HMS Paladin (Lt. H.R. Hewlett, RN) (Force 70) to provide fuel for the smaller ships of Force 61.

At 1940/11 a fast attack force, made up of Richelieu, HMS Cumberland and the destroyer of the 26th Destroyer Flotilla; HMS Saumarez, HMS Venus, HMS Verlulam, HMS Viliglant and HMS Virago were ordered to proceed ahead to about 50 miles from the Task Force to be in a better position to intercept the reported Japanese heavy cruiser.

In the early afternoon of the 12th an air strike with four Hellcats was carried out against airfields on Car Nicobar Island. One Japanese aircraft was seen to go up in flames.

Also on the 12th submarine HMS Statesman reported that the Japanese cruiser and it's escort were returning to Singapore most likely to Force 61 being sighted the previous day by a Japanese aircraft.

During the 13th all destroyers of the Task Force fueled from HMS Emperor, HMS Hunter and HMS Shah. Besides that Task Force 62 was sent out from Trincomalee. This Task Force was made up of the British light cruiser HMS Nigeria (Capt. H.A. King, DSO, RN) and the British destroyers HMS Roebuck (Cdr. C.D. Bonham-Carter, RN), HMS Racehorse (Cdr. J.J. Casement, DSC, RN), HMS Redoubt (Lt.Cdr. F.W.M. Carter, DSC, RN) and HMS Rocket (Lt.Cdr. H.B. Acworth, OBE, RN), which was escorting a convoy, was ordered to leave her convoy and then join this Task Force. Also sailed was Task Force 67, made up of Royal Fleet Auxiliary oiler Olwen escorted by HMS Penn, which by now had completed repairs on her defects.

On the 14th HrMs Tromp was sent ahead to fuel from Task Force 70. Late in the evening the remainder of Task Force 61 arrived at the rendez-vous with Task Force 70.

On the 15th the enemy cruiser and destroyer were sighted by an aircraft from HMS Shah. They were again proceeding to the south-east. Shortly afterwards the enemy was also sighted by a patrolling Liberator aircraft which began shadowing the enemy. At 1500 hours three Avenger aircraft attacked the cruiser.

The 26th destroyer flottila, made up of HMS Saumarez, HMS Venus, HMS Verulam, HMS Vigilant and HMS Vigaro were ordered to intercept the enemy after dark. At 1500 hours they were 85 miles from the position of the enemy.

Around midnight the destroyers made radar contact on the cruiser. They then attacked from all directions with torpedoes. About eight hits were scored and the cruiser was sunk. During the attack HMS Saumarez was hit three times with 8" shells. Two ratings were killed on one boiler room was put out of action. The destroyers rejoined the task force at 1000/16. HMS Virago had only 17% fuel left, the other destroyers between that and 30%. HMS Virago and HMS Venus had to fuel from the escort carriers as they could not make it to the oiling force without doing so.

In the evening of the 16th the Task Force was attacked by Japanese aircraft. HMS Virago was near missed and suffered four ratings killed, five ratings severely wounded and thirteen other casualties. She was also listing slightly due to splinter damage.

At 1000/17 the following ships were detached to return to Trincomalee; Richelieu, HMS Nigeria, HMS Royalist, HrMs Tromp, HMS Khedive, HMS Shah and HMS Racehorce.

1740 hours, the 26th Destroyer Flotilla was also detached to return to Trincomalee where they arrived late in the afternoon on the 18th. By this time all the destroyers of this flotilla had fueled from Force 70.

The remaining ships were ordered to return to Trincomalee at 2130/19. They arrived back at Trincomalee on 21 May. (37)

18 May 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) returned to Trincomalee. (31)

24 May 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Trincomalee for Fremantle, Australia. This was later changed to Darwin, Australia.

For the daily positions during the period of 24 May 1945 to 14 June 1945, see the map below.

(31)

2 Jun 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Darwin. (31)

4 Jun 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Darwin for Manus. (31)

9 Jun 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Seeadler Harbour, Manus Island. (38)

11 Jun 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Seeadler Harbour, Manus for Morotai. (38)

14 Jun 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Morotai. (38)

17 Jun 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Morotai for Balikpapan.

For the daily positions during the period of 17 June 1945 to 8 July 1945, see the map below.

(38)

19 Jun 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived off Balikpapan where she joined Task Force 74.2 which was made up of the US light cruisers USS Montpelier (Capt. W.A. Gorry, USN), USS Denver (Capt. T.F. Darden, USN), USS Cleveland (Capt. H.G. Hopwood, USN), USS Columbia (Capt. M.E. Curts, USN) escorted by the destroyers USS Conway (Cdr. J.H. Besson, Jr., USN), USS Cony (Cdr. A.W. Moore, USN), USS Eaton (Cdr. C. Brown, USN), USS Stevens (Cdr. G.W. Pressey, USN), USS Albert W. Grant (Cdr. G.S. Higginbotham, USN), USS Killen (Cdr. J.L. Semmes, USN) and HMAS Arunta (Cdr. A.E. Buchanan, DSO, RAN) which was one of the Task Forces that provided cover during the operation off Balikpapan. (39)

21 Jun 1945
During the day HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) four times bombarded Japanese shore guns that had opened fire on US minesweepers off Balikpapan. (39)

25 Jun 1945
During the day HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) three times bombarded Japanese targets on the shore in the Balikpapan area. (39)

27 Jun 1945
In the morning HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) bombarded Japanese shore guns off Balikpapan.

Later that day Tromp joined Task Force 74.1 which was made up of the Australian heavy cruiser HMAS Shropshire (Capt. C.A.G. Nichols, MVO, DSO, RN), the Australian light cruiser HMAS Hobart (Capt. R.S. Dowling, RAN), the Australian destroyer HMAS Arunta (Cdr. A.E. Buchanan, DSO, RAN) and the US destroyers USS Hart (Cdr. W.D. Coleman, USN) and USS Metcalf (Cdr. D.L. Martineau, USN). (39)

28 Jun 1945
In the morning HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) bombarded Japanese shore guns off Balikpapan. (39)

30 Jun 1945
In the morning HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) bombarded Japanese shore guns off Balikpapan. (39)

1 Jul 1945
In the morning HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted a shore bombardment shortly before the Allied landings near Balikpapan. (39)

1 Jul 1945

Operation Oboe II, Allied landings at Balikpapan.

Part I, the pre-landing phase.

Composition of the forces taking part was as follows;
Task Group (TG) 78.2 was the Balikpapan Attack Group under Vice-Admiral D.E. Barbey, USN, made up of the following units.
TG 78.2.1 was the Group Flagship Unit under T/Capt. K.D. Ringle, USN, made up of the Amphibious Force Command Ship USS Wasatch (T/Capt. K.D. Ringle, USN, flying the flag of Rear-Admiral A.G. Noble, USN) and fighter direction ship USCGC Spencer (Cdr. J.R. Hinnant, USCG).
TG 78.2.2 was the Transport Unit under A/Capt. A.P. Cousin, RANR(S), made up the Landing Ships HMAS Manoora (A/Capt. A.P. Cousin, RANR(S)), HMAS Westralia (A/Cdr. E.W. Livingston, RANR(S)), HMAS Kanimbla (Cdr. A.V. Bunyan, RANR(S)), Landing Ship Dock USS Carter Hall (Lt.Cdr. H.L. Host, Jr., USNR) and the Attack Cargo Ship Titania (T/Cdr.(Retd.) M.W. Callahan, USN).
TG 78.2.3 was the Fast Transport unit under T/Cdr, Wm.S. Parsons, USN, COMTRANSDIV 103, made up of the High Speed Transports USS Lloyd (Lt.Cdr. W.R. Taylor, USNR, with T/Cdr, Wm.S. Parsons, USN, Commanding Officer COMTRANSDIV 103, on board), USS Newman (Lt.Cdr. R.I. Thieme, USNR), USS Liddle (Lt.Cdr. W.D. Kennedy, USNR), USS Kephart (Cdr. I.H. Cammarn, USNR) and USS Diachenko (Lt.Cdr. S.H. Johnson, USNR).
TG 78.2.4 was the LSM Unit under T/Capt. D.J. Wientraub, USN on board the Landing Craft Flotilla Flagship USS LCFF-789 (Lt. R.J. Minnich, USNR), made up of the following units;
LSM Group 4; under Lt.Cdr. R.C. Johnson, USN, up of the following LSM's; USS LSM-18 (Lt. W.B. Wilder, USNR, with T/Lt.Cdr. R.C. Johnson, USN on board), USS LSM-19 (Lt. E.L. McComb, USNR), USS LSM-21 (Lt. C.L. Crayne, USN), USS LSM-22 (Lt. W.E. Rivinius, USNR), USS LSM-257 (Lt. E.C. Nufer, USNR), USS LSM-258 (Lt.(jg) J. Black, USNR), USS LSM-310 (Lt. E.P. White, USNR) and USS LSM-311 (Lt. P.M. Brooks, USNR).
LSM Group 5; under Lt.Cdr. E.G. Smith, USNR, made up of the following LSM's; USS LSM-36 (Lt. M.S. McLeod, USNR, with T/Lt.Cdr. E.G. Smith, USNR on board), USS LSM-37 (Lt. G.W. Smith, USNR), USS LSM-130 (Lt. L.R. French, USNR), USS LSM-141 (Lt. E.A. Quinlan, USNR), USS LSM-148 (Lt. F.W. Cely, USN), USS LSM-150 (Lt. G.B. McCauley, USNR) and USS LSM-205 (Lt. D.W. Barton, USNR).
LSM Group 6; under T/Lt.Cdr. E.E. Weire, USN, made up of the following LSM's; USS LSM-42 (Lt. S.I. Burton, USNR, with T/Lt.Cdr. E.E. Weire, USN on board), USS LSM-38 (Lt. H.A. Seitz, USNR), USS LSM-39 (Lt. G.C. Hollowell, USNR), USS LSM-40 (Lt. C.L. Garrett, USNR), USS LSM-223 (Lt. P.C. Hawn, USNR), USS LSM-224 (Lt. D.B. Wrensch, USNR) and USS LSM-267 (Lt. R.F. Ruben, USNR).
TG 78.2.5 was the LST Unit under T/Capt. F.J. Mee, USN, made up of the following units;
LST Flot 22 under T/Capt. F.J. Mee, USN, made up of the following LST's; USS LST-632 (Lt. G.W. Chandler, USNR, with COMLSTFLOT 22, T/Capt. F.J. Mee, USN on board), USS LST-639 (Lt. G.M. Brown, USNR), USS LST-714 (Lt. R.F. Williams, USNR), USS LST-721 (Lt. R.B. Safford, USNR), USS LST-935 (Lt. B.B. Wells, USN) and USS LST-938 (Lt. H.W. Limes, USNR).
LST Flot 7 under T/Capt. G.A. Sinclair, USN, made up of the following LST Groups;
LST Group 19, under Cdr. J.E. van Zandt, USNR, made up of the following LST's; USS LST-466 (Lt. J.P. Witherspoon, USNR, with COMLSTFLOT 7, T/Capt. G.A. Sinclair, USN, on board), USS LST-181 (Lt.(jg) C.V. Lynch, USNR), USS LST-245 (Lt. M.J. McCabe, USNR), USS LST-470 (Lt. M. Loring, USNR), USS LST-471 (Lt. J.K. Haman, USNR) and USS LST-474 (Lt. G.L. Hull, USNR, with COMLSTGR19, Cdr. J.E. van Zandt, USNR on board).
LST Group 20, under Cdr. D.M. Baker, USNR, made up of the following LST's; USS LST-452 (Lt. R.D. Jones, USNR, with COMLSTGR20, Cdr. D.M. Baker, USNR on board), USS LST-454 (Lt. D.J. Morrison, USNR), USS LST-456 (Lt.(jg) E.J. Lambert, USNR), USS LST-457 (Lt. W.W. Hacker, USNR) and USS LST-462 (Lt. W.D. Gregory, USNR).
From LST Group 21 were the following LST's; USS LST-66 (Lt. W.J. Holbert, USCGC), USS LST-168 (Lt. H. Twiford, USCG) and USS LST-206 (Lt. S.F. Regard, USCG).
From LST Flot 8
LST Group 23, under T/Cdr. T.C. Linthicum, USN, made up of the following LST's; USS LST-1018 (Lt. P.F. Williams, USNR, with COMLSTGR23, T/Cdr. T.C. Linthicum, USN on board), USS LST-395 (Lt. C.W. Saale, USNR), USS LST-397 (Lt. E.W. Teasley, USNR), USS LST-911 (Lt. M.T. Saffield, USNR), USS LST-1016 (Lt. J.W. Chapman, USNR) and USS LST-1017 (Lt. B.I. Sobel, USNR).
From LST Groups 22 and 24 were the following LST's; USS LST-666 (Lt. J.H. Reid, USNR), USS LST-673 (Lt. J.K. Athow, USNR), USS LST-694 (Lt. J.D. McLaughlin, USNR), USS LST-740 (Lt. A.G. McMahon, USNR) and USS LST-910 (Lt. H.V. Ruble, USN).
From LST Flot 15 were the following LST's; USS LST-579 (Lt. H.B. Severs, USNR), USS LST-703 (LT. E.H. Marsland, USNR), USS LST-753 (Lt. T.J. Dailey, USNR) and USS LST-777 (Lt. W.F. Lagotic, USN).
TG 78.2.6 was the LCI Unit under Cdr. A.V. Jannotta, USNR, made up of the following LCI(L)'s from LCIFLOT24;
USS LCI(L)-624 (Lt. E.F. Harris, USNR, with COMLCIFLOT 24, Cdr. A.V. Jannotta, USNR, on board), USS LCI(L)-622 (Lt. H.V. Smith, USNR), USS LCI(L)-625 (Lt.(jg) C.E. Bole, USNR), USS LCI(L)-634 (Lt.(jg) J.J. Connolly, USNR), USS LCI(L)-636 (Lt. J.A. Moore, USNR), USS LCI(L)-655 (Lt. E. Kingdon, Hurlock, USNR), USS LCI(L)-699 (Lt. P.B. Gates, USNR), USS LCI(L)-700 (Lt.(jg) J.E. Howe, USNR), USS LCI(L)-712 (Lt. R.I. Basch, USNR), USS LCI(L)-999 (Lt.(jg) C.P. Castle, USN), USS LCI(L)-1002 (Lt. E.B. Schicker, Jr., USNR), USS LCI(L)-1003 (Lt.(jg) J.W. Jessee, USNR), USS LCI(L)-1008 (Lt.(jg) W.A. Green, USNR), USS LCI(L)-1025 (Lt. W.C. Kingsley, USNR), USS LCI(L)-1072 (Lt. M.B. Kirby, USNR) and USS LCI(L)-1076 (Lt. O.E. Caldcleugh, USNR).
TG 78.2.7 was the Control Unit under Cdr. A.J. Petersen, USNR, made up of the following patrol vessels; USS PC-1134 (Lt. O.A. Barge, Jr., with Cdr. A.J. Petersen, USNR on board), USS PC-610 (Lt. J.K. Winter, USNR), USS SC-698 (Lt. J.C. Hedges, USNR), USS SC-747 (Lt.(jg) R.E. Oberfeld, USNR) and USS SC-750 (Lt.(jg) F.C. Cuthbertson, USNR).
TG 78.2.8 was the Close Support Unit under T/Cdr. D.H. Day, USN, was made up of the following LCS(L)'s; USS LCS(L)-8 (Lt.Cdr. E.C. Thomas, USNR), USS LCS(L)-27 (Lt.(jg) J.M. Bledsoe, USNR), USS LCS(L)-28 (Lt. R.H. Bost, USNR), USS LCS(L)-29 (Lt. J.F. McNamara, USNR), USS LCS(L)-30 (Lt. C.H. Sanders, USNR), USS LCS(L)-41 (Lt.(jg) A.P. Marincovich, USNR), USS LCS(L)-43 (Lt.(jg) E.A. Blakley, USNR), USS LCS(L)-44 (Lt. J.M. Leggat, USNR), USS LCS(L)-48 (Lt. D.E. Widel, USNR) and USS LCS(L)-50 (Lt. B.T. Clark, USNR). The following LCI(R)'s; USS LCI(R)-230 (Lt.(jg) E.L. Grimes, USNR, with T/Cdr. D.H. Day, USN on board), USS LCI(R)-31 (Ens. D.B. Hummel, USNR), USS LCI(R)-34 (Lt.(jg) F.W. Schwarz, USNR), USS LCI(R)-73 (Lt.(jg) W.V. Ferguson, USN), USS LCI(R)-226 (Ens. J.W. Joyce, USNR), USS LCI(R)-331 (Lt.(jg) E.F. Sheeran, USNR), USS LCI(R)-337 (Ens. G.W. Green, USN) and USS LCI(R)-338 (Ens. J.S. Hageman, USNR). The following LCI(G)'s; USS LCI(G)-21 (Lt.(jg) J.G. Gent, USNR), USS LCI(G)-22 (Lt.(jg) W.F. Saul, USNR), USS LCI(G)-24 (Lt.(jg) G.D. Rankin, USNR), USS LCI(G)-61 (Lt.(jg) R.M. Prann, USNR), USS LCI(G)-66 (Lt.(jg) J.A. Kraus, USNR) and USS LCI(G)-67 (Lt.(jg) G.J. Puhl, USNR).
TG 78.2.9 was the Minesweeping Unit under Lt.Cdr. T.R. Fonick, USNR, made up of the following units;
Task Unit (TU) 72.2.91 was made up of the minesweepers USS Sentry (Lt.Cdr. T.R. Fonick, USNR, (COMMINDIV 34)), USS Scout (Lt. E.G. Anderson, USNR) and USS Scuffle (Lt.Cdr. E.A. Johnson, USNR).
TU 72.2.92 under Lt.Cdr. D.W. Blakeslee, USNR, was made up of the YMS's; USS YMS-9 (Lt.(jg) W.E. Vermillion, USNR), USS YMS-10 (Lt.(jg) R.D. Waterman, USNR), USS YMS-39 (Lt. R.M. Sullivan, USNR), USS YMS-46 (Lt.(jg) T. Markin, USNR), USS YMS-47 (Lt. R.H. Heller, USNR), USS YMS-49 (lt.(jg) D.E. Reysa, USNR), USS YMS-50 (Lt(jg) B.G. Stern, USNR), USS YMS-51 (Lt.(jg) A.L. Giesenschlag, USNR), USS YMS-53 (Lt.(jg) F.W. Ketner, USNR), USS YMS-65 (lt. C.R. Silk, USNR), USS YMS-73 (Lt. J.H. Frederick, USNR), USS YMS-84 (Lt. J.V. Barton, USNR), USS YMS-95 (Lt.(jg) G.E. Newby, Jr., USNR), USS YMS-224 (Lt.(jg) F.J. Weingartner, USNR), i>USS YMS-269 (Lt. P.J. Ganey, USNR), USS YMS-314 (Lt.(jg) J.W. Easton, USNR), USS YMS-315 (Lt. E.E. martin, Jr., USNR), USS YMS-335 (Lt.(jg) R.F. Klick, USNR), USS YMS-336 (Lt.(jg) J.A. Reid, USNR), USS YMS-339 (Lt.(jg) M.E. Fitzgerald, USNR), USS YMS-364 (Lt. C.K. Soper, USNR), USS YMS-365 (Lt.(jg) F.C. Huff, USNR), USS YMS-366 (Lt. (jg) T.J. Duncan, Jr., USNR), USS YMS-367 (Lt.(jg) E.E. Huppenbauer, Jr., USNR), USS YMS-368 (Lt.(jg) C.D. Drago, USNR) and USS YMS-392 (Lt. W.H. Kendrick, USNR). As tenders for the minesweepers there were the high speed transport USS Cofer (Lt. H.C. McClees, USNR) and the LSM USS LSM-1 (Lt. E.J. Flowers, USNR).
TG 78.2.10 was the Beach Party Unit.
TG 78.2.11 was the Demolition Unit under Lt. States, was made up of the high speed transports USS Kline (Lt. B.F. Uran, USNR) and USS Schmitt (Lt. T.A. Melusky, USNR) and two underwater demolition teams.
TG 78.2.12 was the LCT Unit under Lt. Buckley. This unit was made up of the following LCT's;
LCT Group 73 was made up of USS LCT-1293 (with Lt. Buckley on board), USS LCT-1081, USS LCT-1289, USS LCT-1291, USS LCT-1295, USS LCT-1297, USS LCT-1299, USS LCT-1301, USS LCT-1302, USS LCT-1304, USS LCT-1306, USS LCT-1308, USS LCT-1325 and USS LCT-1329.
LCT Group 21 was made up of USS LCT-1298 (with Lt. Coffin (COMLCTGR21) on board), USS LCT-83, USS LCT-178, USS LCT-372, USS LCT-373, USS LCT-864, USS LCT-898, USS LCT-990, USS LCT-992, USS LCT-1016, USS LCT-1296 and USS LCT-1327.
TG 78.2.13 was the Salvage and Firefighting Unit under Lt.Cdr. H. Pond, USNR, made up of the salvage vessel Cable (Lt.Cdr. H. Pond, USNR), USS LCI(S)-700 (?), USS LCI(S)-702 (?), USS LCI(S)-1000 (?) and USS LCI(S)-1071 (?) and the tug USS ATR-61 (Lt. W.M. Heywood, USNR).
TG 78.2.14 was the Service Unit under Lt.Cdr. Wallace, made up of the following ships; oiler USS Chepachet (Lt.Cdr. H.K. Wallace, USNR), gasoline tankers USS Sakatonchee (Lt. F.C. Steinmetz, USNR), USCG Gualala (?), landing craft repair ship USS Creon [Former LST-1036] (Lt. M.G. Pooley, USNR), landing craft LST's USS LST-67 (serving as ammunition ship) (Lt. R.L. McGirl, USNR), USS LST-171 (Lt. M.B. Taylor, USNR), USS LSM-129 (Lt. W.A. Farmer, USNR), cargo ship USS Poinsett (Lt.Cdr. R.M. Baughman, USNR), army cargo ships FS 164, FS 361, auxiliary Banshee (?), auxiliary trawler USS YP-421 (Lt.(jg) W.E. Baker, USN), tug USS Pinto (Lt. R. Brown, USNR) and floating crane USS YD-65.
TG 78.2.15 was the Screening Unit under COMDESRON 5, T/Capt. F.D. McCorkle, USN, made up of the following units;
Destroyer Squadron 5 was made up of the following destroyers; USS Flusser (T/Lt.Cdr. K.G. Robinson, USN with COMDESRON 5, T/Capt. F.D. McCorkle, USN on board), USS Drayton (T/Lt.Cdr. V.A. Dybdal, USN), USS Conyngham (T/Lt.Cdr. F.W. Bampton, USN) and USS Smith (T/Lt.Cdr. E.H. Huff, USN).
Destroyer Squadron 14 was made up of the following destroyers; USS Frazier (T/Lt.Cdr. J.N. Renfro, USN, with COMDESRON 14, T/Capt. G.L. Sims, USN on board) and USS Bailey (T/Lt.Cdr. A.F. Johnson, USN).
Destroyer Squadron 22 was made up of the following destroyers; USS Robinson (T/Cdr. R.E. Malpass, USN, with COMDESRON 22, T/Capt. R.H. Smith, USN on board), USS Saufley (T/Lt.Cdr. F.W. Silk, USN), USS Waller (T/Cdr. H.leR. Thompson, Jr., USN), USS Philip (T/Cdr. J.B. Rutter, Jr., USN).
There were also five destroyer escorts part of the Screening Unit, these were; USS Chaffee (Lt.Cdr. A.C. Jones, USNR), USS Edwin A. Howard (Lt.Cdr. F.D. Denfeld, USNR), USS Jesse Rutherford (Lt.Cdr. J.W. Jordan, USNR), USS Key (T/Lt.Cdr. F.D. Buckley, USN) and USS Leland E. Thomas (Lt.Cdr. B.J. Dunn, USNR). The frigate HMAS Gascoyne (Lt. E.J. Peel, RAN) was also part of Screening Unit.
TG 78.2.16 was the Press Unit, made up of the USS LCI(L)-635 (Lt. H. Hopkins, USNR) and the small army cargo ship FP 47.
TG 78.2.17 was the Hydrographic Unit under A/Cdr. C.G. Little, DSC, RAN, made up of the sloop HMAS Warrego (A/Cdr. C.G. Little, DSC, RAN), USS YMS-196 (Lt. C.W. Griffith, USNR) and USS Mango (Lt. H.R. Greenley, USNR).

To provide cover for the operation the following Units were deployed.
TU 70.1.5 was the Motor Torpedo Boat Unit under Lt.Cdr. Tappan, made up of two Motor Torpedo Boat Tenders; USS Mobjack (Lt.Cdr. J.H. McClain, USNR) and USS Varuna (Lt. C.J. Kalb, USN) and the tug USS ATR-56 (Lt. E.C. McCoy, USNR). These ships served 23 Motor Torpedo Boats of MTB Squadrons 10 and 27.
MTBRON 10 was made up of the following Motor Torpedo Boats; USS PT-108, USS PT-116, USS PT-124, USS PT-125, USS PT-163, USS PT-167, USS PT-168, USS PT-169, USS PT-170, USS PT-171 and USS PT-174.
MTBRON 27 was made up of the following Motor Torpedo Boats; USS PT-356, USS PT-357, USS PT-358, USS PT-359, USS PT-360, USS PT-361, USS PT-372, USS PT-373, USS PT-374, USS PT-375, USS PT-376 and USS PT-377.
Task Force (TF) 74 was the Support and Covering Group under T/Rear-Admiral R.S. Riggs, USN, made up of the following units.
TG 74.1 under Commodore H.B. Farncomb, DSO, MVO, RAN, was made up of the heavy cruiser HMAS Shropshire (Capt. C.A.G. Nichols, MVO, DSO, RN, flying the broad pendant of Commodore H.B. Farncomb, DSO, MVO, RAN), light cruiser HMAS Hobart (Capt. R.S. Dowling, RAN) and the destroyers USS Hart (T/Cdr. W.D. Coleman, USN) and USS Metcalf (T/Cdr. D.L. Martineau, USN).
TG 74.2 under T/Rear-Admiral R.S. Riggs, USN, was made up of the light cruisers USS Montpelier (T/Capt. W.A. Gorry, USN, flying the flag of T/Rear-Admiral R.S. Riggs, USN (COMCRUDIV 12)), USS Cleveland (T/Capt. H.G. Hopwood, USN), USS Columbia (T/Capt. M.E. Curts, USN), USS Denver (T/Capt. T.F. Darden, Jr., USN), HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) and the destroyers USS Conway (T/Cdr. J.H. Besson, Jr., USN, with COMDESDIV 44, T/Capt. S.G. Hooper, USN on board), USS Stevens (T/Cdr. G.W. Pressey, USN), USS Cony (T/Lt.Cdr. T.C. Siegmund, USN), USS Eaton (T/Cdr. C. Brown, USN), USS Killen (T/Cdr. J.L. Semmes, USN), USS Albert W. Grant (T/Cdr. G.S. Higginbotham, USN, with COMDESDIV 112, T/Capt. B.J. Mullaney, USN, on board) and HMAS Arunta (Cdr. A.E. Buchanan, DSO, RAN).
TG 74.3 under T/Rear-Admiral R.S. Berkey, USN, was made up of the light cruisers USS Nashville (T/Capt. A. MacOndray, Jr., USN, flying the flag of COMCRUDIV 15, T/Rear-Admiral R.S. Berkey, USN), USS Phoenix (T/Capt. H.L. Challenger, USN, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral D.E. Barbey, USN, Commander Balikpapan Attack Force, CTF 78) and the destroyers USS Conner (T/Lt.Cdr. W.A. Sissons, USN, with COMDESRON 51, T/Capt. H.J. Martin, USN), USS Charette (T/Lt.Cdr. G.P. Joyce, USN, with COMDESDIV 102, T/Capt. J.W. Callahan, USN on board), USS Bell (T/Lt.Cdr. B.H. Shupper, USN) and USS Burns (T/Cdr. J.T. Bullen, Jr., USN).
TG 78.4 was the Escort Carrier Group under T/Rear-Admiral W.D. Sample, USN, made up of the following escort carriers; USS Suwanee (T/Capt. D.S. Cornwell, USN, with COMCARDIV22, T/Rear-Admiral W.D. Sample, USN on board), USS Block Island (T/Capt. F.M. Hughes, USN), USS Gilbert Islands (T/Capt. L.K. Rice, USN). They were escorted by the destroyer USS Dale (T/Lt.Cdr. S.M. Zimny, USNN) and the destroyer escorts USS Mitchell (Lt.Cdr. J.K. Carpenter, USNR), USS Donaldson (Lt.Cdr. H.G. Hartmann, USNR), USS Cloues (Lt.Cdr. K.G. Rich, USNR), USS Lamons (Lt.Cdr. H.C.M. Lamkin, USNR) and USS Kyne (Lt.Cdr. C.F Sweet, Jr., USNR).

The day of the landings was set at 1 July 1945, which was known as 'Fox' day. But as usual before a landing operation a period om minesweeping and bombardments preceeded the landings. We deal with these operations first.

The mission of the minesweepers was to clear the channels, approaches, anchorages, landing beaches and other designated areas of Allied and enemy mines prior to 'Fox' day in Balikpapan Bay, Borneo, NEI, to allow safe passage for the Balikpapan Attack Group.

Enemy minefields were reported off shore southeast of Balikpapan and also across the harbour entrance. Sutstantial enemy ground forces and many coast defence and duel purpose guns were known to be present defending the beaches. The enemy was expected to make every effort to harass and repulse the pre-'Fox' day operations.

Extensive Allied minelaying activity was conducted by RAAF Caralinas between February and October 1944 in Balikpapan Harbour and approaches. Of the total of 126 Allied infuence mines planted a possible 93 were still assumed to be active and requested sweeping prior to the landings on 'Fox' day. Due to the quantity and types of Allied mines present in the area it was agreed that a minimum of 16 days would be required to provide an approach chennel and to cover fire support areas to a reasonable degree of safety for landing operations to be conducted.

Minesweeping operations pre-'Fox' day

On 11 June 1945 ('Fox' day-20), at 0700I Oboe II, 'A' echelon got underway from Morotai for Balikpapan. The following vessels were part of this echelon. USS Smith, USCG Gualala, USS YMS-10, USS YMS-46, USS YMS-47, USS YMS-49, USS YMS-50, USS YMS-52, USS YMS-53, USS YMS-95, USS YMS-315, USS YMS-335, USS YMS-336, USS YMS-339, USS YMS-364, USS YMS-366, USS YMS-368 and USS YMS-392.

At 0900I/13, USS Drayton departed Morotai to rendezvous with 'A' echelon.

At 1430I/13, TG 74.2 departed Tawi Tawi to rendezous with 'A' echelon. TG 72.2 was divided into five groups for fire support duty, these were;
TU 74.2.1 was Fire Support Unit Able, made up of USS Montpelier and USS Conway.
TU 74.2.2 was Fire Support Unit Baker, made up of USS Denver and USS Eaton.
TU 74.2.3 was Fire Support Unit Charlie, made up of USS Columbia and USS Cony.
TU 74.2.4 was Fire Support Unit Dog, made up of HrMs Tromp (to join later) and USS Stevens.
TU 74.2.5 was Fire Support Unit Echo (to join later), made up of USS Cleveland, USS Killen and USS Albert W. Grant.
USS Hart, USS Medcalf and HMAS Arunta were still operating off Brunei Bay on the 13th and only joined later.

At 1745I/13, USS Cofer departed Tawi Tawi to rendezvous with 'A' echelon.

Around 0720I/14, all groups joined in position 01°01'N, 119°38'E. USS Smith and USS Drayton then departed for Morotai. The other ships then set course for the operations area.

At 0642I/15, TU 78.2.92 arrived at the 100 fathom curve due east of the objective. YMS commenced streaming minesweeping gear and began sweep of apporach track for moored and acoustic mines in wedge formation. USS Cofer, USCG Gualala and TG 74.2 following them into swept water. At 1324I/15 the right and left flank of the YMS formation proceeded independently as had been planned. At 1622I/15 the right and left flank reformed wedge formation and commenced sweeping the approach track on an easterly course. At 2222I/15 sweeping ceased and the gear was recovered at the 100 fathom curve. All results of sweeping were negative.

At 0650I/16, the YMS Unit was detached to carry out assigned moored, magnetic and acoustic exploratory sweep of the fire support areas. At 0901I/16, minesweeping LCVP's commenced exploratory sweep of reported Japanese minefields. They returned at 1425I/16 from their minesweeping operations. At 1915I/16, all sweeping ceased and the YMS also retired for the night. Again no mines were swept this day.

At 0625I/17, minesweeping operations commenced in the fire support areas. These operations ceased at 1905I/17 when the YMS retired for the night. All results were again negative.

At 0630I/18, minesweeping operations commenced in the assault and close fire support areas. At 1253I/18, USS YMS-50 exploded an allied influence mine under her bow and was seriously damaged. At 1300I/18, USS YMS-50 was taken under fire by enemy shore batteries. The cruiser support group opened up with counter battery fire. At 1312I/18, LCVP's from USS Cofer proceeded to the rescue of personnel and also attempted to tow USS YMS-50. At 1448I/18, the LCVP's were also taken under fire and the attempts to tow USS YMS-50 were abandoned. All personnel was rescued. USS Denver then opened fire on the hulk of USS YMS-50 which then finally sank. At 1815I/18, minesweeping operations ceased and the YMS retired for the night. At 1855I/18 a Japanese float plane (Pete) closed TU 78.2.92, USS Cofer opened fire. The Combat Air Patrol took up chase of the aircraft. No further enemy air activity was reported. One influence mine was swept which damaged USS YMS-50.

At 0625I/19, YMS's commenced scheduled sweep of assault and close support areas. At 1100I/19, the sweepers were taken under fire by shore batteries and the support group then silenced these. At 1250I/19, the YMS minesweepers were again taken under fire by shore batteries but no damage was sustained. At 1900I/19, the minesweepers recovered their gear and then got underway again to retire for the night.

At 0640I/20, the YMS commenced scheduled sweep of fire support areas. At 1322I/20, USS YMS-368 exploded an Allied influence mine near her stern causing severe structural damage. USS Cofer effected temporary repairs and the vessel remained afloat. At 1850I/20 minesweeping was ceased, gear recovered and the minesweepers retired for the night. One influence mine was swept on this date which damaged USS YMS-368.

At 0600I/21, the YMS commenced scheduled operation in assault and close support areas. At 1038I/21 the YMS Unit came under fire from shore batteries. No damage was sustained. At 1258I/21, they again came under fire by enemy shore batteries and yet again at 1450I/21. At 1455I/21, USS YMS-335 was struck by a shell on her 3" gun platform. She sustained four killed and five wounded. At 1916I/21, minesweeping operations ceased and the YMS retired for the night. No mines were swept on this day.

At 0530I/22, YMS commenced scheduled sweep in assault and close support areas. At 1006I/22, the YMS came under fire from shore batteries. At 1014I/22, USS YMS 10 was struck in the bow, above the waterline, by a shell. There were no personnel casualties. At 1430I/22, USS Sentry, USS Scout, USS YMS-39, USS YMS-314, USS YMS-365 and USS LSM-1 arroved on the objective area. Lt.Cdr. Fonick then took over command of TU 78.2.9 from Lt.Cdr. Blakeslee. At 1658I/22, the YMS again came under fire. They retired for the night at 1956I/22. No mines were swept on this day.

At 0530I/23, YMS commenced operations in assault and close support areas. At 1006I/23 they again came under fire from shore batteries. USS YMS-364 was struck by an enemy shell which failed to explode. At 1310I/23, USS YMS-368 was damaged by a mine explosion. She was taken in tow by USS YMS-335 and they departed for Tawi Tawi. At 1515I/23, shore batteries again opened fire on the YMS. No damage was sustained. At 1841 the YMS retired for the night. Again no mines were swept on this day.

At 0540I/24, YMS commenced scheduled operations in the assault area. USS Scout with 6 YMS conducted a moored sweep of the approach track to broaden the existing swept channel. At 1253I/24, USS YMS-9 reported for duty with TU 78.2.9. The TU came under sporadic fire from shore batteries during the day. No damage was sustained. At 1920I/24, TU 78.2.9 units retired for the night. Once again no mines were swept during this day.

At 0530I/25, YMS commenced scheduled operations in assault lane and close support area. At 0905I/25, the leading YMS were taken under fire by shore batteries but no damage was sustained. At 1105I/25, USS YMS-52 exploded an influence mine. At 1343I/25, USS YMS-365 detonated an influence mine which damaged her sweep. She retired from the area to effect repairs. Also YMS-39 detonated one influence mine and cut one moored mine in her sweep which was sunk by gunfire. At 1845I/25, TU 78.2.9 proceeded to the anchorage area of Balikpapan. Three influence and one moored mine were swept during the day. At 2030I/25 they came under attack by four enemy aircraft. At 2033I/25, USS Cofer was attacked by three enemy aircraft which fired torpedoes which passed under her bow. One aircraft was shot down by USS Cofer. Another aircraft was shot down by USS Cofer in conjunction with other ships of TU 78.2.9. A third aircraft was shot down by USS Sentry.

At 0611I/26, YMS commenced scheduled operations in the assault area. At 0700I/26, USS Scuffle and USS YMS-196 reported for duty with TU 78.2.9. At 1008I/26, an influence mine exploded during minesweeping operations in the assault area. At 1200I/26, three more contact mines were swept in the area which were destroyed by USS Stevens. At 1343I/26, USS YMS-365 detonated an influence mine with magnetic sweep. At 1424I/26, USS YMS-365 exploded a mine, thought to be of influence type, directly beneath her. The keel was broken amidships. USS YMS-364 proceeded to remove her survivors. All personnel was saved. USS YMS-196 joined in the rescue and opened fire on the hulk of the damaged minesweeper which resulted in her bow section being sunk. The stern finally sank at 1645I/26. At 1547I/26, USS YMS-39 exploded a mine, believed to be an Allied magnetic mine. Her superstructure disintergrated and the vessel capsized and sank in less than one minute. Two additional mine explosions occurred in short succession the first approximately 100 yards abean and the second near electrode of long log. USS YMS-196 proceeded to rescue the survivors. Three of the crew were killed and one was missing. LCVP's from USS Cofer and USS Schmidt assisted in the rescue of surivors from USS YMS-39 and USS YMS-365. At 1855I/26, minesweeping ceased and the minesweepers proceeded to the anchorage. Six influence and three moored mines had been swept. Destroyers took fire support stations on this day to render close support during sweeping operations. Further enemy gunfire directed against the minesweepers was sporadic and inaccurate.

At 0610I/27, YMS commenced scheduled operations in the assault area. At 1310I/27, USS YMS-392 detonated an influence mine without sustaining damage. At 1840I/27, minesweeping operations ceased and the minesweepers proceeded to the anchorage. One influence and one moored mine were swept on this date.

At 0614I/28, YMS commenced scheduled operations in the assault area. At 1405I/28, USS YMS-47 exploded an Allied influence mine under her stern. A large hole was the result and the after compartments were flooded. USS YMS-366 and USS YMS-49 assisted by LCVP's from USS Cofer, USS Kline and USS Schmitt succeeded in rescuing all personnel and in towing USS YMS-47 out of the mine field. USS YMS-47 was taken alongside USS Scout for pumping and emergency repairs. Although the after deck was awash the engine room compartments were pumped out and the vessel stayed afloat. At 1920I/28, minesweeping ceased and the minesweepers returned to the anchorage. two influence mines were swept on this day, one of which damaged USS YMS-47.

At 0610I/29, YMS commenced scheduled operations in the assault area. These operations were ceased at 1850I/29 when they returned to the anchorage. Four moored contact mines were swept on this date.

YMS again commenced minesweeping operations in the assault area on 30 June [no time given in the report but must have been after dawn.] At 0945I/30, USS YMS-314 exploded an Allied influence mine about 100 feet astern. She sustained minor damage. At 1300I/30, USS YMS-65 and USS YMS-269 reported for duty with TU 78.2.9. At 1927I/30, minesweeping operations ceased and all YMS returned to the anchorage. One influence and three moored contact mines were swept this date.

At 0615/1, on 'Fox' day, YMS commenced scheduled sweeping operations in the area adjacent to the landing beach. USS YMS-196 was released from duty with TU 78.2.9 and she joined the Hydrographic Unit. At 1815I/1, USS YMS-84, USS YMS-224 and USS YMS-367 reported for duty with TU 78.2.9. At 1917I/1, minesweeping operations ceased for the day and the YMS returned to the anchorage. One moored mine was swept on this day. Total to this date, 15 Allied influence mines and 13 enemy moored contact mines were swept.

Pre-'Fox' day operations by Underwater Demolition Teams.

At 1700I/20, the temporary formed TU 78.2.93 departed Morotai for the operations area. This TU was to render close in fire support to the Underwater Demolition Teams during their pre-invasion operations of destroying underwater obstacles in the landing areas. These opertions would cover a day of six days in which reconnaissance and three days in which obstacle demolition operations were successfully carried out. TU 78.2.93 was made up of USS LCS(L)-30 (with COMLCS(L)GR 1, Lt.Cdr. W.F. Hunt, USNR on board), USS LCS(L)-8, USS LCS(L)-28, USS LCS(L)-29, USS LCS(L)-41, USS LCS(L)-43, USS LCS(L)-44 and USS LCS(L)-48. Taking passage with them from Morotai were also USS Schmitt, USS YMS-9 and USS Mango.

Around 1100I/24, TU 78.2.93 entered the Balikpapan area and reported to CTU 74.2 and 78.2.9 for duty. No assignment was given for the remainder of the day.

Around 0715I/25, The LCS(L) were in position to give fire support for underwater demolition work in the alternate landing areas at Manggar and Manggar Ketjil. A heavy concentration of 3", 40mm and 20mm was delivered into the immediate beach areas to eliminate, if possible, any sniper and machine gun positions. At 0800I/25, when the swimmers were taken into the beach, the fire was decreased and was concentrated in the tree tops along the beach. By 1000I/25 the reconnaissance was completed and all units retired and anchored.

Pre-dawn on the 26th, all ships of TU 78.2.93 got underway towards the Manggar Ketjil area to support obstacle demolition activities of the Underwater Demolition Teams. At 0700I/26 ships on station commenced strafing the beach. Between 0700 and 0820 hours, when swimmers embarked, fire was ceased several times to allow low level air strikes to be carried out. At 1025I/26, swimmers completed their assignment and charges were set off. Shortly thereafter units withdrew from a successful days work and anchored as before.

At 0430I/27, ships got underway and proceeded towards the assault beach at Klandasan. The passage was through unswept and hazardous water and a maximum speed of five knots was maintained at all times. To insure safe navigation the USS Stevens maintained an accurate radar plot and transmitted instructions via voice radio. By 0740I/27, all ships were anchored at short stay 2300 yards from the beach and commenced firing into the beach area. Eight small enemy mortar and gun fire was received from the beach. At 0840I/27, the swimmers commenced their reconnaissance work and completed this around 1030I/27. Several ships observed enemy gun emplacements and either took them under fire or reported them to enable larger units to do a more effective job. On completion of the operation all ships retired to the anchorage.

At 0345I/28, TU 78.2.9 got underway. USS Stevens again did an excellent job of plotting the ships through the mine fields. At 0745I/28, all ships anchored 1200 yards from the beach and the order to open fire was given. At 0840I/28, obstacle demolition began. Several enemy gun emplacements began to fire on the demolition teams and the support ships. At 1020I/28, USS LCS(L)-8 received a hit in the conn and at 1041 she received two more. Four men were slightly injured from shrapnel. Prior to this at 0740I/28, USS LCS(L)-41 received four hits from small automatic weapons. Damage was slight. At 1040I/28, the demolition charge was detonated and retirement commenced. The ships then returned to the anchorage.

On 29 June TU 78.2.9 conducted no operations.

At 0610I/30, the ships of TU 78.2.9 again go underway for the Klandasan area where the Underwater Demolition Teams were to complete their operations. Heavy air strikes and bombardment aided greatly in keeping enemy fire to a minimum. The Demolition Teams commenced operations at 0840I/30 and at 0945I/30 they were finished and detonated the charges. No damage was inflicted by the enemy on this day.

Pre-'Fox' day operations TG 74.2.

TG 74.2, at that moment made up of the light cruisers USS Montpelier, USS Columbia, USS Denver and the destroyers USS Conway, USS Stevens, USS Cony and USS Eaton, departed Tawi Tawi around 1430I/13. They then made rendezvous with TU 78.2.92 around 0720I/14 in position 01°01'N, 119°38'E. They then escorted this TU to the Balikpapan area.

It was the mission of TG 74.2 to destroyer enemy personnel, defences, installations and facilities in the Balikpapan Area in the vicinity of the landing beaches by gunfire and by directing air force aircraft in attack missions until the arrival of the Attack Group Commander.

On 15 June TG 74.2 with TU 78.2.93 arrived in the Balikpapan area. At 0745I/15 the COMTASKGR 74.2 directed the group to form the Fire Support Units as listed above (HrMs Tromp was to arrive later) and then for the Units to proceed independently with the cruisers streaming paravanes.

At 0807I/15, USS Denver completed streaming paravanes and proceeded with USS Stevens and USS Eaton in support of the minesweepers.

Shortly after noon a flight of B-24's bombarded Balikpapan. Following the read a large column of black smoke was sighted rising from the Manggar area and later also from the area of Signal Hill.

At 0719I/16, USS Stevens was ordered to assist the minesweepers with navigation using her SG radar.

At 1027I/16, USS Conway made a depth charge attack on an A/S contact but it was later thought to have been a submerged wreck.

At 0720I/17, USS Stevens was again detached to assist the minesweepers with navigation.

Around 1230I/17, a flight of B-24's bombarded Balikpapan. They did not made contaced with the Commander Support Aircaft on board USS Montpelier.

Around 1430I/17, three squadrons of Liberators bombarded the target area. These had contacted the Commander Support Aircraft on board USS Montpelier successfully before they started their attacks.

At 1450I/17, USS Denver commenced a bombardment from long range with an aircraft spotting.

At 1500I/17, USS Montpelier commenced a bombardment with an aircraft spotting.

In the evening of the 17th TU 74.2 was attacked by enemy aircraft but no damage was sustained. It was estimated that seven aircraft had attacked. Their result was several near misses.

At 1000I/18, B-24 bombers attacked Balikpapan again. The entire area of the attack was shrouded by smoke. One hour later eight more B-24 squadrons were over the target area but six of them bombard the secondary target, the Manggar area, due to bad visibility over the primary target.

At 1256I/18, the Fire Support Units opened a counter battery fire after USS YMS-50 had been mines and taken under fire by the enemy.

At 1516I/18, wounded and survivors from USS YMS-50 were put on board USS Montpelier.

At 1602I/18, USS Denver sank the wreck of USS YMS-50 with gunfire.

Around 1000I/19, the first B-24's of the day arrived over the target area. More strikes followed during the day.

At 1230I/19, USS YMS-10 reported being fired upon. USS Stevens was ordered to give her support and she was able to silence the enemy gun.

At 1340I/19, USS Conway was detached to give navigational aid to the YMS minesweepers. She rejoined on completion of this task at 1725I/19.

At 1625I/19, HrMs Tromp arrived from Morotai and reported for duty with TG 74.2.

During the morning of 20 June the destroyers fuelled from the cruisers.

Around noon air strikes commenced. More strikes followed during the afternoon.

At 1530I/20, HrMs Tromp dropped two depth charges on an A/S contact but lost the contact immediately afterwards. The A/S contact was probably a wreck.

In the afternoon of the 20th some wounded men from the damaged USS YMS-368 were put on board USS Denver for treatment.

Around 0920I/21, B-24's arrived to commence this day's air attacks.

Around 1140I/21, USS Denver opened fire on enemy coast batteries.

Around 1255I/21, cruisers and destroyers again opened fire on enemy coast batteries after USS YMS-52 had been fired upon.

At 1452I/21, YMS's were taken under fire by a previously unreported enemy battery. USS YMS-335 was hit. The destroyers were ordered to take silence this enemy coast battery. Four casualties and five wounded from USS YMS-335 were later transferred to USS Montpelier.

At 1535I/21, USS Conway was detached to give navigational aid to some YMS minesweepers. On completion of this duty she rejoined her Unit. Some cover fire was provided from time to time by the cruiser and destroyers of TU 74.2.

At 0915I/22, the first air strike of the day hit the target area. As usual air strikes continued throughout the day.

At 1000I/22, the leading YMS was taken under fire by enemy guns. TF 74.2 replied with a heavy barrage.

At 1657I/22, USS YMS-53 was taken under fire by the enemy. TF 74.2 replied with gunfire.

During 23 June 1945, USS Montpelier, USS Denver, USS Columbia, HrMs Tromp, USS Conway, USS Stevens, USS Cony, USS Eaton, USS Cofer, USS Schmitt and USCG Gualala were fuelled by USS Chepachet which had arrived escorted by USS Leland E. Thomas. On completion of the fuelling operations they left for Tawi Tawi.

At 0835I/23, USS Denver and USS Conway were fired upon by enemy coastal batteries. these were immediately taken under fire and the enemy guns ceased fire.

At 1130I/23, a target that had been taken under fire by USS Montpelier blew up with a series of violent explosions. This must have been an ammunition dump.

At 1145I/23, air strikes commenced.

At 1303I/23, YMS were taken under fire by enemy shore batteries. These were quickly silenced by counter battery fire from the cruisers and destroyers.

On 24 June 1945, several ships of TG 74.2 were ammunitioned by USS LST-67 which had arrived escorted by USS Bell. This continued also on 25 June. Upon completion of ammunitioning these were ordered to proceed to Tawi Tawi.

At 0415I/24, USS Cony was detached to aid the YMS with navigation during their operations.

At 0840I/24, an enemy AA battery, which had opened fire on spotting aircraft, was taken under fire and silenced by USS Columbia.

At 1015I/24, USS Denver reported having knocked out an enemy gun.

Around 1100I/24, heavy air strikes commenced. Several bombs however landed way too close to Allied ships.

At 0400I/25, USS Denver, USS Conway and USS Cony were ordered to provide fire support during operations of Underwater Demolition Team 11 during operations on the Manggar and Manggar Ketjil beaches. B-25's also supported the operation with low level bombing attacks. One B-25 crashed, its crew being rescued by USS Cony.

At 0959I/25, the leading YMS was taken under fire by enemy shore batteries. USS Montpelier, USS Eaton and USS Stevens replied with counter battery fire.

Around 1113I/25, B-24's commenced the days air attacks on Balikpapan.

At 1155I/25, USS Bell silenced an enemy gun with several salvoes.

In the evening of the 25th, enemy aircraft attacked the forces in the Balikpapan area but no damage was done by them. Several attackers were shot down.

During the night of 25/26 June 1945, USS Cony conducted a night harassing mission off the Manggar / Manggar Ketjil beaches.

At 0500I/26, USS Denver and USS Conway were ordered to join USS Cony off the the Manggar / Manggar Ketjil beaches to give support to the Underwater Demolition Teams that were to operate there this morning. On completion of the operations they rejoined the remainder of TF 74.2.

At 0735I/26, the operations by the Underwater Demolition Teams commenced. B-24's and B-25's also assisted with bombing strikes which were very effective and were completed around 0815I/26. More air strikes on the Balikpapan area were conducted later in the morning and very early in the afternoon.

After USS YMS-365 had hit a mine. Her survivors were later put on board USS Columbia as did the survivors from USS YMS-39 which had also been mined later the same afternoon.

At 0610I/27, USS Stevens was detached to aid the LCS with navigation during their support of the Underwater Demolition Teams at Klandasan beach.

Around 0815I/27, air strikes commenced.

At 0950I/27, fire was opened on enemy guns in the beach area.

Around 1000I/27, TG 74.1, made up of HMAS Shropshire, HMAS Hobart, HMAS Arunta, USS Hart and USS Metcalf arrived in the area from Tawi Tawi.

Around 1105I/27, USS Edwin A. Howard, USS Mobjack and eight Motor Torpedo Boats (from MTB RON 10; USS PT-163, USS PT-167, USS PT-170, USS PT-174 and from MTB RON 27; USS PT-361, USS PT-372, USS PT-373 and USS PT-377) arrived in the area from Tawi Tawi.

During the night of 27/28 June 1945, four Motor Torpedo Boats patrolled the area. These were from MTB RON 10; USS PT-167 and USS PT-170 and from MTB RON 27; USS PT-372 and USS PT-377.

At 0425I/28, USS Stevens was detached to again aid the LCS with navigation during their support of the Underwater Demolition Teams.

At 0547I/28, Both TG 74.1 and 74.2 were ordered to take up their assigned bombardment stations.

At 0650I/28, firing from the beach against the LCS(L)'s was reported. The cruisers were ordered to commence a bombardment.

At 0758I/28, B-25's commenced bombarding the beach area in support of the Underwater Demolition Teams. The strike lasted for about 10 minutes.

The enemy was much more active this day and from time to time engaged our forces which each time replied with gunfire to silence the enemy guns.

At 1026I/28, USS LCS(L)-28 was hit. Five minutes afterwards she reported to have lost steering control but last she regained control after having effected repairs.

At 1030I/28, the demolition charges set by the Underwater Demolition Units went off, on schedule despite the enemy's efforts to frustrate their work.

During the night of 28/29 June 1945, USS Stevens conducted a night harassing mission along the Klandalan beaches while MTB's (from MTB RON 27; USS PT-361 and USS PT-373) operated off the Manggar beaches. Also patrolling were from MTB RON 10; USS PT-163 and USS PT-174 to the south of Balikpapan and from MTB RON 27; USS PT-372 and PT-377 off the Pengah River mouth.

At 1142I/29, the first flight of B-24's started to attack targets in the vicinity of Signal Hill. More attacks followed throughout the day.

At 1245I/29, a B-25 crashed into the sea. Two survivors were picked up by a floatplane from USS Montpelier and later put on board the cruiser.

Late in the afternoon / early in the evening, the destroyers, less USS Stevens, fuelled from the cruisers.

During the night of 29/30 June 1945, USS PT-163 and USS PT-170 patrolled to the south-west of Balikpapan. PT-167 and USS PT-377 patrolled between the Manngar River estuary and Sepinggan.

At 0830I/30, the LCS(L)'s were in position off Klandasan beach and opened fire to cover the Underwater Demolition Team swimmers. Air strikes also commenced shortly before 0900 hours.

At 0924I/30, the Underwater Demolition Teams reported having completed their objective. They had sustained no casualties, opposition had been light this morning.

USS Chepachet, escorted by Leland E. Thomas, had also returned from Tawi Tawi to fuel ships from TU's 74.1 and 74.2. During the day she fuelled; USS Montpelier, USS Conway, USS Denver, USS Stevens, USS Columbia, USS Edwin A. Howard, HMAS Shropshire, USS Schmitt, HMAS Hobart and USS Killen.

At 1645I/30, fire was opened on enemy shore batteries by USS Hart after USS YMS-314 was taken under fire which herself also replied with her 3" gun.

Around 1925I/30, TG 74.1 and 74.2 retired from the area for the night minus USS Denver and USS Hart remained off Klandasan to cover the area from possible minelaying operations by the enemy. Also USS Metcalf remained behind for a night harassing fire mission.

During the night of 30 June / 1 July, USS PT-372 and USS PT-377 patrolled between Manggar and Sambodja and USS PT-361 and USS PT-373 patrolled between between Stalkoedo and Manggar Ketjil.

'Fox' day approaching, more cover forces arriving in the area.

As 'Fox' day (1 July 1945) was now approaching more cover forces were despatched to the area.

At 0610I/26, TG 78.4, the Escort Carrier Group departed Leyte for Balikpapan. It was made up of the escort carriers USS Suwanee, USS Block Island and USS Gilbert Islands which were escorted by They were escorted by the destroyer USS Dale and the destroyer escorts USS Mitchell, USS Donaldson, USS Cloues USS Lamons and USS Kyne.

At 1900I/28, USS Nashville, USS Charette and USS Bell from TG 74.3 departed Tawi Tawi to make rendezvous with the Escort Carrier Group which they did at 0809I/29.

At 0838I/29, the light cruiser USS Phoenix and the destroyers USS Conner and USS Burns also joined. They had departed Morotai around 0630I/28.

After these forces had joined company the organisation now became as follows;
TG 78.4 under command of T/Rear-Admiral W.D. Sample, USN, was divided into the following Units;
TU 78.4.1 was the Escort Carrier Unit under T/Rear-Admiral W.D. Sample, USN (COMCARDIV 22), made up of the escort carriers USS Suwanee, USS Block Island and USS Gilbert Islands. On board USS Block Island was T/Rear-Admiral D. Ketcham, USN (COMCARDIV 27) as Second in Command).
TU 78.4.2 was the Screen under T/Capt. J.H. Martin, USN (COMDESRON 51), made up of the destroyers USS Conner, USS Charette, USS Bell, USS Burns, USS Dale and the destroyer escorts USS Mitchell, USS Donaldson, USS Cloues, USS Lamons and USS Kyne.
TU 78.4.3 was the Cruiser Unit under T/Rear-Admiral R.S. Berkey, USN, made up of the light cruisers USS Nashville and USS Phoenix (with CTF 78 embarked).

After TG 78.4 had formed up course was set for the Balikpapan area.

These was also TG 74.2 which departed Manila Bay for Balikpapan via Tawi Tawi at 1800I/27, TG 74.2.5, made up of the light cruiser USS Cleveland and the destroyers USS Albert W. Grant and USS Killen. On board the USS Cleveland was Army General MacArthur, Commander in Chief Southwest Pacific Aera (CinCSWPA), and his staff. In the morning of the 29th of June they made a short call at Tawi Tawi to pick up the latest mail for the CinCSWPA.

Now back to TG 78.4, at 1448I/29, USS Lamons obtained an A/S contact in position 01°34'N, 119°59'E and an emergency turn was made.

At 1454I/29, USS Lamons dropped a full pattern of depth charges. USS Dale went over to assist and both remained at the scene to hunt the possible enemy submarine while the remainder of the TG continued their passage towards Balikpapan. They rejoined the TG at 1924I/29.

During the 29th a continues CAP and A/S patrol had been maintained for the TG from 0636I/29 to 1920I/29.

On 30 June 1945 CAP and A/S patrol were maintained over the Balikpapan area from 0657I/30 to 1918I/30 and also over the own TG from 1352I/30 to 1918I/30. In the afternoon some of the escorts (USS Burns, USS Conner, USS Charrette, USS Dale and USS Bell) fuelled from either USS Suwanee and USS Block Island. Otherwise passage was uneventful and TG 78.4 arrived east of Balikpapan around 0730I/30.

TG 74.2 arrived in the Balikpapan area in the evening of 30 June.

Passage of the landing forces to the Balikpapan area.

The bulk the Balikpapan Attack Group (TG 78.2, see above) departed Morotai for the landing area on 26 June 1945 so as to arrive in the operations area on 30 June ('Fox'-1). Passage was uneventful and the first units crossed the 100 fathom curve shortly before midnight during the night of 30 June / 1 July. (40)

6 Jul 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) conducted a shore bombardment on Japanese troops and a battery to aid Allied troops on land.

Later that day Tromp departed the Balikpapan area for Morotai. (39)

8 Jul 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Morotai. (38)

17 Jul 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Morotai for Seeadler Harbour, Manus.

For the daily positions during the period of 17 July 1945 to 20 July 1945, see the map below.

(38)

20 Jul 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Seeadler Harbour, Manus. (38)

14 Aug 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Seeadler Harbour, Manus for Tarakan, Borneo, Netherlands East Indies.

For the daily positions during the period of 14 August 1945 to 23 August 1945, see the map below.

(38)

15 Aug 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) is ordered to return to Seeadler Harbour, Manus. (38)

16 Aug 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived back at Seeadler Harbour, Manus. (38)

17 Aug 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) departed Seeadler Harbour, Manus for Sydney, Australia. (38)

23 Aug 1945
HrMs Tromp (A/Capt. F. Stam, RNN) arrived at Sydney, Australia.

Early September Tromp departed Sydney for the Dutch East Indies. (38)

Sources

  1. File 2.12.27.121 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  2. File 2.12.03.6846 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  3. File 2.12.03.6847 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  4. File 2.12.03.6848 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  5. File 2.12.03.6849 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  6. Files 2.12.03.6849 and 2.12.27.121 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  7. ADM 53/114033 + ADM 53/114230 + ADM 53/115714 + ADM 199/408 + Report of proceedings of HMAS Hobart from 9 December 1941 to 11 January 1942 + Files 2.12.03.6849 and 2.12.27.121 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  8. Report of proceedings of HMAS Hobart for February 1942
  9. File 2.12.03.6850 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  10. Report of proceedings of HMAS Voyager for July 1942 + File 2.12.03.6850 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  11. Commander Allied Naval Force Western Australia for September 1942
  12. Report of proceedings of HMAS Adelaide for August 1942 + File 2.12.03.6850 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  13. Report of proceedings of HMAS Adelaide for December 1942
  14. Report of proceedings of HMAS Adelaide for January 1943 + File 2.12.03.6850 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  15. Report of proceedings of HMAS Adelaide for February 1943 + File 2.12.03.6850 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  16. ADM 53/117366 + ADM 53/117562
  17. File 2.12.03.6851 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  18. Report of proceedings of HMAS Adelaide for May 1943 + File 2.12.03.6851 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  19. File 2.12.03.6852 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  20. ADM 53/117109 + ADM 53/118603 + ADM 53/118604 + ADM 199/643 + File 2.12.03.2100 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands) + File 2.12.03.6852 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  21. File 2.12.03.2100 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands) + File 2.12.03.6852 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  22. ADM 53/117708 + File 2.12.03.6852 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  23. File 2.12.03.6853 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  24. File 2.12.03.2100 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands) + File 2.12.03.6853 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  25. ADM 53/120209 + File 2.12.03.6853 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  26. Files 2.12.03.6853, 2.12.27.121 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands) and ADM 199/1388
  27. Files 2.12.03.6853 and 2.12.27.121 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands) and WO 203 / 4621 (British National Archives, Kew, London)
  28. ADM 53/119481 + ADM 53/119801 + ADM 53/120163 + File 2.12.03.6853 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  29. Files 2.12.03.6853 and 2.12.27.121 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands) and WO 203 / 4767 (British National Archives, Kew, London)
  30. Files 2.12.03.6853 and 2.12.03.6854 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  31. File 2.12.03.6854 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  32. ADM 53/119174 + File 2.12.03.6854 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  33. Files 2.12.03.6854 and 2.12.27.121 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands) and WO 203 / 4622 (British National Archives, Kew, London)
  34. Files 2.12.03.6854 and 2.12.27.121 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands) and WO 203 / 4980 (British National Archives, Kew, London)
  35. ADM 53/120771 + File 2.12.03.2101 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  36. Files 2.12.03.6854 and 2.12.27.121 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands) and WO 203 / 4778 and ADM 199 / 193 (British National Archives, Kew, London)
  37. Files 2.12.03.6854 and 2.12.27.121 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands) and WO 203 / 4630 (British National Archives, Kew, London)
  38. File 2.12.03.6855 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  39. Files 2.12.03.6855 and 2.12.27.121 (Dutch Archives, The Hague, Netherlands)
  40. Report by COMTASKGROUP 78.2 on the Balikpapan operation + Report by COMTASKGROUP 78.2.9 on the Balikpapan operation

ADM numbers indicate documents at the British National Archives at Kew, London.


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