Allied Warships

Events on this day

7 July

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This page is our compilation of data from several different databases. All data shown here is dynamic, but is accurate according to the information we have right now. Although content is still being added daily, more than 75% of the launched and commissioned data is already in place, so this section is almost complete.

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The Shipyard Report


Laid down (49)

1927: French Navy Submarine Fresnel

1936: Soviet Navy Destroyer Razumniy

1939: Royal Navy Escort destroyer Cleveland (L 46) - Royal Navy ASW Whaler Wastwater (FY 239) - US Navy Escort carrier Long Island (CVE 1)

1941: Royal Navy Motor Torpedo Boat MTB 312 (MTB 312) - US Navy Destroyer tender Cascade (AD 16) - US Navy Motor torpedo boat PT 54

1942: Royal Navy Minesweeper BYMS 2052 (J 852) - Royal Navy Motor Gun Boat MGB 189 (MGB 189) - US Navy Patrol craft PC-1226 (PC-1226) - US Navy Patrol craft PC-613 (PC-613) - US Navy Patrol craft PC-614 (PC-614) - US Navy Patrol craft PC-615 (PC-615) - US Navy Motor torpedo boat PT 141 - US Navy Motor torpedo boat PT 203

1943: Royal Canadian Navy Frigate Thetford Mines (K 459) - Royal Navy Landing Craft Tank LCT 675 (LCT 675) - Royal Navy Submarine Sidon (P 259) - US Navy Destroyer Allen M. Sumner (DD 692) - US Navy Submarine Hardhead (365) - US Navy Tank landing ship LST 131 (LST 131) - US Navy Tank landing ship LST 44 (LST 44) - US Navy Frigate Orange (PF-43) - US Navy Frigate Pasco (PF-6) - US Navy Motor torpedo boat PT 402 - US Navy Motor torpedo boat PT 558 - US Navy Destroyer Escort Roberts (DE 749) - US Navy Submarine chaser SC-1477 (SC-1477)

1944: Royal Navy Landing Craft Tank LCT 1214 (LCT 1214) - Royal Navy Tank landing ship LST 3025 (LST 3025) - US Navy Landing Craft Infantry LCI(L)-1079 (LCI(L)-1079) - US Navy Landing Craft Infantry LCI(L)-792 (LCI(L)-792) - US Navy Landing craft tank LCT 912 (LCT 912) - US Navy Medium landing ship LSM 59 (LSM 59) - US Navy Medium landing ship LSM 60 (LSM 60) - US Navy Medium landing ship LSM 61 (LSM 61) - US Navy Medium landing ship LSM 62 (LSM 62) - US Navy Tank landing ship LST 595 (LST 595) - US Navy Tank landing ship LST 648 (LST 648) - US Navy Tank landing ship LST 720 (LST 720) - US Navy Tank landing ship LST 936 (LST 936) - US Navy Motor torpedo boat PT 576 - US Navy Motor torpedo boat PT 751

1945: US Navy Destroyer Basilone (DD 824) - US Navy Medium landing ship LSM 541 (LSM 541) - US Navy Medium landing ship LSM 542 (LSM 542) - US Navy Medium landing ship LSM 543 (LSM 543) - US Navy Medium landing ship LSM 544 (LSM 544)

Launched (55)

1917: Royal Navy MS Trawler Ceylonite (FY 1853)

1919: Royal Navy Destroyer Wells (I 95) - US Navy Destroyer Tillman (i) (DD 135)

1925: Royal Navy Armed Merchant Cruiser Asturias (F 71) - Royal Navy MS Whaler Swona (FY 1802)

1927: Italian Navy Destroyer Euro

1929: Italian Navy Submarine Fratelli Bandiera

1932: Royal Navy Destroyer Duncan (D 99)

1934: United States Coast Guard Patrol vessel Nemesis (WPC 111) - United States Coast Guard Patrol vessel Nike (WPC 112) - United States Coast Guard Patrol vessel Triton (WPC 116)

1936: Royal Navy Destroyer Havock (H 43) - Royal Navy ASW Trawler King Sol (FY 235) - US Navy Submarine Pickerel (i) (177) - Soviet Navy Submarine Kalev - Soviet Navy Submarine Lembit

1937: Royal Navy Destroyer Gurkha (i) (F 20)

1938: Royal Norwegian Navy Destroyer Gyller

1939: Royal Navy Sloop Black Swan (L 57 / U 57)

1941: Royal Indian Navy MS Trawler Travancore (T 312) - Royal New Zealand Navy MS trawler Kiwi (T 102) - US Navy Motor torpedo boat PT 40 - US Navy Net tender Teak (AN 35) - Soviet Navy Submarine M-203

1942: Royal Indian Navy Minesweeper Bihar (J 247) - Royal Navy Landing Craft Tank LCT 357 (LCT 357) - Royal Navy Motor minesweeper MMS 198 (J 698) - Royal Hellenic Navy Patrol craft Vasilefs Georgios (ii) (P 17) - US Navy Destroyer Bache (DD 470) - US Navy Patrol craft PC-622 (PC-622)

1943: Royal Navy Sloop Hart (U 58) - Royal Navy Landing Craft Tank LCT 436 (LCT 436) - Royal Navy Landing Craft Tank LCT 766 (LCT 766) - US Navy Patrol craft PC-1183 (PC-1183) - US Navy Frigate Tacoma (PF-3) - US Navy Minesweeper YMS-293 (YMS-293)

1944: Royal Navy Frigate Loch Achray (K 426) - US Navy Landing Craft Infantry LCI(L)-649 (LCI(L)-649) - US Navy Landing craft tank LCT 1113 (LCT 1113) - US Navy Landing craft tank LCT 1185 (LCT 1185) - US Navy Landing craft tank LCT 1323 (LCT 1323) - US Navy Medium landing ship LSM 47 (LSM 47) - US Navy Medium landing ship LSM 48 (LSM 48) - US Navy Medium landing ship LSM 49 (LSM 49) - US Navy Medium landing ship LSM 50 (LSM 50) - US Navy Tank landing ship LST 712 (LST 712) - US Navy Submarine Tench (417) - US Navy Submarine Thornback (418) - US Navy Minesweeper YMS-438 (YMS-438)

1945: US Navy Destroyer Brownson (ii) (DD 868) - US Navy Medium landing ship (rocket) LSM(R) 529 (LSM(R) 529) - US Navy Medium landing ship (rocket) LSM(R) 530 (LSM(R) 530) - US Navy Medium landing ship (rocket) LSM(R) 531 (LSM(R) 531) - US Navy Medium landing ship (rocket) LSM(R) 532 (LSM(R) 532) - US Navy Destroyer Richard B. Anderson (DD 786)

Commissioned (35)

1915: Italian Navy Torpedo boat Antonio Mosto

1923: Royal Navy Aircraft Carrier Hermes (D 95)

1932: French Navy Heavy cruiser Dupleix

1937: Royal Navy Destroyer Ilex (D 61)

1940: Royal Navy Minesweeper La Capricieuse

1941: Royal Navy Corvette Campion (K 108)

1942: Royal Navy Landing Craft Tank LCT 330 (LCT 330) - Royal Navy Motor Gun Boat MGB 606 (MGB 606) - US Navy Motor torpedo boat PT 108

1943: Royal Navy Minesweeper BYMS 2230 (J 1030) - Royal Navy Escort Carrier Empire Macandrew - Royal Navy Motor minesweeper MMS 1018 (FY 1018) - Royal Navy Submarine Sea Rover (P 218) - US Navy Destroyer Escort Fogg (DE 57) - US Navy Tank landing ship LST 213 (LST 213) - US Navy Tank landing ship LST 214 (LST 214) - US Navy Patrol craft PC-614 (PC-614) - US Navy Motor torpedo boat PT 262 - US Navy Motor torpedo boat PT 277 - US Navy Submarine chaser SC-1037 (SC-1037) - US Navy Submarine chaser SC-1294 (SC-1294) - US Navy Minesweeper YMS-273 (YMS-273)

1944: Royal Navy Harbour Defence Motor Launch HDML 1397 (ML 1397) - Royal Navy Frigate Pitcairn (K 589) - Royal Navy Minesweeper Tanganyika (J 383) - Polish Navy Motor Torpedo Boat S 6 (MTB 425) - US Navy Minesweeper Device (AM 220) - US Navy Landing Craft Infantry LCI(L)-1075 (LCI(L)-1075) - US Navy Landing Craft Infantry LCI(L)-644 (LCI(L)-644) - US Navy Medium landing ship LSM 31 (LSM 31) - US Navy Tank landing ship LST 1028 (LST 1028) - US Navy Patrol craft PC-1222 (PC-1222) - US Navy Patrol craft PC-1547 (PC-1547) - US Navy Minesweeper YMS-449 (YMS-449)

1945: US Navy High speed transport Weiss (APD 135)

Legend:

Laid down means that the ship's construction was officially started by laying down the keel (often just a single steel beam but could also mean the first of many pre-fabricated sections).

Launched means that the ship was launched from its shipyard, it then began its fitting out period (installation of smaller systems, weapons etc.) - in many yards the ships were launched very complete and needed little work afterwards.

Commissioned is when the navy takes the ship officially over and gives command of it to its new captain.

War Losses on 7 July (2)


1944: Royal Canadian Navy Motor Torpedo Boat MTB 463 (MTB 463) - Royal Navy Tank landing ship LST 216 (LST 216)

More information on Allied Warships losses.


General Events on 7 July


1940

Royal Navy Heavy cruiser HMS Dorsetshire: The attack on the French battleship Richelieu, 7 / 8 July 1940. The Admiralty orders operations against the Richelieu. The Admiralty had originally intended that the Richelieu should be dealt with by Vice-Admiral Sommerville’s Force H from Gibraltar but later they decided to employ Force H in the Mediterranean and that the Richelieu was to be put out of action by aircraft from HMS Hermes (Capt. R.F.J. Onslow, RN). Both on account of his up-to-date local knowledge and his air experience Captain Onslow was chosen to take charge of this operation, with the temporary rank of Acting Rear-Admiral. The Admiralty orders to him were contained in a signal sent at 0144/7 (zone -1), which read as follows; ‘H.M. Government have decided question of Richelieu and other French warships at Dakar must be settled without delay. 1) You have been selected to take charge of the operations on account of your recent local and air knowledge, and are hereby promoted to Acting Rear-Admiral until further orders. 2) You are to take HMS Dorsetshire (Capt. B.C.S. Martin, RN), HMAS Australia (Capt. R.S. Stewart, RN) and HMS Milford (Capt. R.J. Shaw, MBE, RN) under your command. 3) You should communicate with the French Naval Authorities at Dakar in manner you think best and transmit text of message which will follow in another signal soon. A decision must be asked within four hours so as to give the Richelieu no time to get underway. 4) Shoud alternative 3 be accepted you take such measures of demilitarization to ensure that ships could not be brought into service for at least a year even at a fully equipped dockyard port. [Seven suggestions to archive this were then given] 5) If all alternatives are refused you should as soon as possible carry out an attack on Richelieu with torpedo aircraft and maintain this attack until it is certain she is sufficiently disabled. Approximately half your torpedoes should have Duplex pistols and half contact pistols and endeavor should be made to obtain a hit in the vicinity of the propellers with a contact pistol. All attacks should be from one side if possible. 6) Bombardment by 8” cruisers should not be carried out in view of the small damage to be expected on the Richelieu and streght of defences. 7) HMS Dorsetshire and HMAS Australia should show themselves at intervals during the operation, but no unnecessary risk of submarine attacks should be accepted by any ship. French naval authorities should be informed your forces are kept at a distance until this decision on account of their submarines. 8) Should it be possible after Richelieu have been dealt with, the two light cruisers should also be attacked. Armed merchant cruisers should not be attacked. 9) Any ship endeavours to put to sea should be brought into action. Whether Richelieu can be attacked under these circumstances by the 8” cruisers should depend on her 15” main battery being operative and effective. 10) H.M. Government desires operation to be carried out as soon as possible subject to your plan as being as proposed. 11) Should Richelieu have left Dakar before receipt of these orders she is to be called upon to stop. If she obeys this order the procedure outlined above is to be carried out. If she refuses to stop she is to be attacked with torpedo aircraft. 12) Inform Admiralty in due course whether operation will take place and of various phases of operations as they occur. This signal was followed almost immediately by another which gave the terms of communication which Acting Rear-Admiral Onslow was to make to the French authorities at Dakar. Four alternatives were to be offererd; 1) To sail their ships with reduced crews and without ammunition, under British control, to a British port. The crews would be repatriated as soon as possible, and the ships restored to France at the end of the war, or compensation paid if damaged meanwhile 2) To sail with us with reduced crews and without ammunition to some French port in the West Indies, where the ships are to be demilitarized or perhaps entrusted to the United States. Crews to be repatriated. 3) To demilitarize the ships at Dakar to Acting Rear-Admiral Onslow’s satisfaction within 12 hours, to such an extent that they would be incapable of taking part further in the present war. 4) To sink their ships within 6 hours. A reply was required within 4 hours, failing the adoption of one of the alternatives, force will be resorted to. Acting Rear-Admiral Onslow’s proceedings, 7 July 1940. After these clear and unequivocal signals had been deciphered Acting Rear-Admiral Onslow’s first concern was the delivery of the British ultimatum to the French authorities. He decided to concentrate HMS Hermes, HMS Dorsetshire, HMAS Australia and meet up with HMS Milford as soon as possible. HMS Milford would then proceed into Dakar with the full text of H.M. Governments terms. By 0800 hours that morning the three ships were steaming south in company, but there was some delay in meeting HMS Milford, as owning to pressure of work in the wireless office of HMS Hermes, Acting Rear-Admiral Onslow had told HMAS Australia to pass a signal to HMS Milford to join his flag, and the Australia used a cypher not held by the Milford. Meanwhile, at 0900 hours the Commander-in-Chief, South Atlantic had asked Acting Rear-Admiral Onslow whether he wished any signal to be made to the Consul-General at Dakar. He replied with a request that the Consul-General to be informed that HMS Milford was being sent into Dakar with an important message for the French Admiral. It was not until 1155 hours that HMS Milford joined. No time was then lost, and havig embarked Paymaster-Lieutenant R.S. Flynn, RN as interpreter, she left for Dakar at 1214 hours, with a copy of the British ultimatum on board. At 1300 hours, Acting Rear-Admiral Onslow informed the Admiralty that she was on her way and that she should arrive around 1400 hours. On her arrival off Dakar however, the French Admiral declined to accept the British communication and threatened to open fire unless she retired. A request that he should reconsider his decision was met with a blank refusal and at 1448 hours HMS Milford reported that she was returned towards HMS Hermes. Acting Rear-Admiral Onslow then reported this information to the Admiralty without delay, adding that he intended to attack at dusk. From the first appearance of HMS Milford off Dakar the French kept the British force under aerial observation. Aircraft from HMS Hermes have been keeping Dakar under observation during daylight hours as of 0600/5. At 1700/7 a special reconnaissance was carried out by the Squadron Commander with the senior observer in view of the attack that had to be carried out soon. Shortly afterwards Admiralty approval for the dusk attack was received. Meanwhile the French authorities seem to have thought better of their abrupt refusal to receive the Milford’s communication, and at about 1615 hours a signal was made to her to the effect that the Governor-General approved of her message being passed by W/T. A further signal seemed to indicate that Admiral Plancon was now prepared to receive it. These signals were interpreted by HMAS Australia and passed on to Acting Rear-Admiral Onslow, who decided to deal with the matter himself, and on receipt of the second message started to pass H.M. Government’s full terms in English by wireless; but in order to allow time to prepare for offensive action during the night he reduced the time limit for a reply from four hours to two. These developments he reported to the Admiralty and the Commander-in-Chief, South Atlantic at 1700 hours. Dakar W/T station acknowledged the receipt of the message at 1805 hours and the ultimatum was thus due to expire at 2005/7. This however was over an hour after sunset and the Commander-in-Chief, South Atlantic therefore suggested that the attack with torpedo planes should therefore be carried out at dawn the next day. The possibility that the Richelieu might put to sea during the night could not be overlooked and Acting Rear-Admiral Onslow deployed his ships in such a manner and closer inshore then 20 miles that the most likely routes were covered. Disposition of Dakar during the night of 7/8 July 1940. Air reconnaissance had shown that a definite lane leading from the Richelieu in a north-easterly direction had been purposely made through the large number of merchant ships anchored in the Outer Roads, and it seemed that a passage through the outer boom might have been made between Gorée Island and R’solue Shoal to facilitate her escape in that direction. To guard against this HMS Milford was ordered to patrol further eastward then originally intended. At 1914/7 the Acting Rear-Admiral detached HMS Dorsetshire and HMAS Australia to take up their patrol lines, while HMS Hermes and HMS Milford in company proceeded towards the west end of the latter’s patrol line. No reply to the ultimatum had been received from the French authorities, and at 2003 hours (two minutes before it’s expiration) Acting Rear-Admiral Onslow made a polite signal asking for an answer. There was no response and at 2020 hours he decided to take offensive action. This was to consist of a depth charge attack by the Hermes’s fast twin-engine motor-boat on the Richelieu during the night, followed by a torpedo attack with aircraft at dawn. At 2050 hours HMS Hermes and HMS Milford stopped, being then 17 nautical miles due south of Cape Manuel, the motor-boat was lowered, and started on the first stage of its adventurous trip. Depth charge attack on the Richelieu. The motor-boat, which was manned by a volunteer crew of nine with blackened faces, commanded by Lt.Cdr. R.H. Bristowe, RN, had been painted matt black all over during the afternoon (much to the distress of the Boat Officer) and had been armed with a Vickers machine-gun. It carried four depth charges, a portable wireless set, which would prove to be much useful, and extra petrol, oil and provisions. Lt.Cdr. Bristowe’s orders were to proceed with HMS Milford to the western end of her new patrol line within 10 nautical miles of Dakar harbour and thence to go on alone into the outer harbour, passing over and around booms as he thought best. He was to drop the four depth charges under the Richelieu’s stern if he discovered her at anchor, or across her bows if he found her under way. If he failed to find her he was to report that by wireless at once. After the operation he was to endeavor to get in tow of the Milford on her patrol line by 0300/8 but if he found this impossible he was to make a rendezvous with Acting Rear-Admiral Onslow’s force at 0530/8. At 2100/7 the crew manned the boat and proceeded with two depth charges from the Hermes to pick up two more from the Milford. A considerable swell was running and when the first depth charge was being hoisted in from the Milford it struck one of the crew of the motor-boat and struck him out. It also wrecked the port engine. Fortunately the new starboard engine which had been fitted during the afternoon, but which had not been tested due to lack of time, was running beautifully. When HMS Milford got under way at 2145/7, she ordered to motor-boat to follow her at 12 knots if possible. The depth charges slung outboard upset the boat’s stability and it had a perilous trip. Near its point of departure from the Milford a large ship hove into sight which, at first, looked like the Richelieu but it answered the Milford’s challenge correctly and proved to be HMAS Australia. The motor-boat then parted company and, when out of sight, stopped while the crew lifted the last depth charge into position. When this task was completed, all hands, except the two Royal Marines, which were manning the Vickers machine-gun in the bows carried out a drill with the depth charge throwers. Then they continued their was towards Dakar. Gorée Islands hove into sight after what appeared to have been hours. Actually it was now 0015/8. Shortly afterwards the boat almost collided with a destroyer that was patrolling outside the boom but remained unseen. It then proceeded slowly at only three knots until off the outer boom. The engine was then stopped and it slid over safely. It then went ahead at dead slow speed with engine muffled until it encountered a colonial sloop (must have been the Bougainville), which it at first mistook for the Richelieu and had nearly attacked. Again the motor-boat remained unseen and it now steered for the merchant ships which formed two straight lines running in a north-easterly direction from the Richelieu as she lay about three quarters of a mile due east of the inner harbour entrance. Then passing round the north-eastern end of the inner boom, it steered towards the reported position of the Richelieu, keeping close to the nearest line of merchant ships until the battleship with a merchant vessel laying almost dead astern of her, came into sight. Lt.Cdr. Bristowe steered for the merchant ship which afforded an excellent position from which to attack. As he approached her, however, he sighted a harbour launch under way just astern of the battleship, and decided to attack at once from the quarter instead of from astern. Events followed quickly. The motor-boat was challenged but before the challenge was completed Lt.Cdr. Bristowe had given orders to attack at full speed. As he approached the Richelieu he was challenged again six times, but although he could not reply the French held their fire. The coxswain’s orders were to go alongside the stern of the battleship, to graze their port side steering towards her bow, and then, as soon as Lt.Cdr. Bristowe gave the order ‘over’ to dash cover amongst the merchant ships. At the last moment a lighter lying right aft along the battleship’s port side, and her port quarter boom with a boat made fast to it, came into sight in the light of the half moon. These the coxswain avoided most skillfully and at 0210 hours put the motor-boat alongside about 30 yards from the battleships stern over what Lt.Cdr. Bristowe hoped was the vital spot for which he was looking. The depth charges then went over. Frenchmen on the quarterdeck of the Richelieu stood looking over the side, apparently at first wondering about what was happening below. When they finally discovered they beat a hurried retreat. Meanwhile the motor-boat dashed for safety amongst the mechant ships. The complete absence of any explosions came as an anti-climax. Although the Richelieu very quickly sent a general signal which was acknowledged quickly by the shore batteries and the ships in the harbour but no searchlights were switched on. Lt.Cdr. Bristowe decided to get away as soon as possible at full speed to take full advantage of the remaining two hours of darkness. He made a dash for the outer boom. As he approached the boom, however, an auxiliary vessel sighted the motor-boat and gave chase, and, being unable to shake of this pursuer, Lt.Cdr. Bristowe steered at full speed towards the boom with the French vessel only 50 yards behind. The motor-boat passed safely over the nets around 0300 hours but its pursuer got caught in the nets. Another patrol vessel then came into sight and took up the chase, but with steering a zig-zag course the moto-boat managed to escape. Neither French vessel had opened fire. It was already too late to make rendezvous with HMS Milford so Lt.Cdr. Bristowe set course to make rendezvous with the main force. At 0355 hours he informed HMS Hermes by wireless that he had dropped his four depth charges under the stern of the Richelieu at 0210 hours. At about 0505 hours there were a number of explosions coming from the direction of the French battleship followed by heavy gunfire. A few minutes later a Swordfish aircraft passed overhead, flying to seaward. The Fleet Air Arm attack had taken place. As dawn broke the Richelieu came into sight, shrouded by a pall of yellow smoke, some two to three miles away. There was a heavy barrage of French AA fire and Lt.Cdr. Bristowe turned south to avoid it. A French bomber appeared overhead and for 15 minutes the motor-boat zigzagged to throw it off, but it dropped no bombs. At 0545 hours, Lt.Cdr. Bristowe decided that he could not reach HMS Hermes so he set course for Bathurst, over 70 nautical miles away. Soon however, a signal was received from the Hermes to stop engines. About noon HMS Hermes picked up the motor-boat 13 nautical miles south of Cape Manuel, after it had been away from the ship for 15 hours. Acting Rear-Admiral Onslow considered the conduct of Lt.Cdr. Bristowe and the remaining crew of the motor-boat in the highest degree of praiseworthy. It was just said that the depth charges did not explode in the shallow water. The venture clearly deserved better success. The Fleet Air Arm torpedo attack on the Richelieu at dawn on 8 July 1940. At 2300/7, Acting Rear-Admiral Onslow had ordered Lt.Cdr. Luard, the leader of 814 Squadron to carry out a torpedo attack with the greatest possible number of aircraft on the Richelieu at dawn the next day. As only three of the available pilots had previously taken off at night Lt.Cdr. Luard decided that the six crews should consist of one pilot and one observer only and that no air gunners were to be part of the crews (to their disappointment). They were to form up in two sub flights in line ahead at a height of 2000 feet, one mile ahead of the Hermes. The pistols carried by the first, second and fourth Swordfish were fitted with Duplex pistols and were set to run under the Richelieu at 38 feet. Those carried by the other three Swordfish were contact pistols set to run at 24 feet. All six were set to run at 40 knots. The attack was only possible from one side owning to nets, shipping and depth of the water. From this direction, the north-east, the six aircraft were to attack in line ahead, and were then to return to HMS Hermes independently. At 0415/8 they all took off successfully from HMS Hermes which was then in position 14°37’N, 17°46’W about 20 nautical miles west of Cape Manuel, and at 0445 hours took departure about 2000 feet over her. At 0452 hours they sighted the Cape Verde peninsula and at 0500 hours when they were approaching Gorée Island they formed a single line ahead. At 0502 hours, Lt.Cdr. Luard went into a shallow dive from the south to keep a good background as long as possible, turning south-west at 0505 hours. Fortunately the Richelieu was swung heading south-east broadside on. He aimed his torpedo at her port side, two-thirds of the way aft from a range of 800 yards. When he had completed his attack he turned to port and made a rapid get-away to the south before turning west to rejoin HMS Hermes. The other five Swordfish dropped their torpedoes in quick succession. As Lt.Cdr. Luard made his attack a large number of AA guns opened fire and engaged all six Swordfish. The third aircraft to attack saw the two previous torpedo tracks running straight for the Richelieu and the last aircraft reported seeing four tracks proceeding towards her. Two of the aircraft saw a large column of smoke rising from the Richelieu and all the pilots considered that they had made good drops. Owning to the lack of light and the necessity of getting away quickly they found it imposible to observe the effect of their torpedoes but Lt.Cdr. Luard estimated that at least four or five of them had run correctly towards the target. He landed without mishap on board HMS Hermes at 0526/8 and all the other Swordfish did the same afterwards. One had been hit twice and another one once by AA fire but they had received only minor damage. Conclusion The exact amount of damage done to the Richelieu was not easy to determine. Lt.Cdr. Luard estimated that four or five of the torpedoes dropped by the six aircraft had run correctly towards their target and that HMS Dorsetshire reported hearing five distinct explosions between 0500 and 0515 hours. A pall of smoke shrouding the Richelieu was reported by one of the pilots and his observer. As the day wore on, further evidence convinced Acting Rear-Admiral Onslow that she had been disabled. Air reconnaissance reported her as being down by the stern, with large quantities of oil all around her. Of this he informed the Admiralty at 0930/8. On the recovery of the motor-boat at noon Lt.Cdr. Bristowe reported hearing explosions while his motor-boat lay broken down off the end of the inner boom at 0230 hours, which he naturally attributed to his depth charges exploding underneath her stern. Like the Dorsetshire he had heard a number of explosions around 0510 hours and had noticed the pall of smoke reported by the airmen. Between 0930 and 1235 hours, French aircraft made intermittent attacks on the British force. They failed to press these attacks home but after picking up the motor-boat Acting Rear-Admiral Onslow ordered his ships to the south and south-west to avoid the French aircraft whilst still keeping the Richelieu under observation from the air. Photographs showed her down by the stern and slightly listing to port. At 1314/8 the Admiralty replied to the report of 0930 hours. ‘Good, but further attacks should be made and report made’. But it was too late. During the afternoon the Richelieu was moved to the inner harbour and berthed alongside the detached mole where she rested on the bottom at low tide. At this position she was immune from further torpedo attack. This information was passed to the Admiralty at 1710 hours, together with the opinion that the Richelieu was definitely disabled. It was suggested that the British force should proceed to Freetown to fuel. HMS Milford was detached after dark. The other ships took up night patrolling positions but just after midnight Admiralty approval to proceed to Freetown was received. HMS Hermes and HMS Dorsetshire indeed did so but HMAS Australia proceeded to the U.K. The passage to Freetown by HMS Hermes and HMS Dorsetshire was not without incident. In a sudden dense tropical storm during the middle watch on 10 July HMS Hermes collided with the armed merchant cruiser HMS Corfu (Capt. W.G. Agnew, RN) which was escorting convoy SL 39 coming from Freetown. HMS Corfu was badly holed, while HMS Hermes suffered severe damage to her bow and the forward end of her flight deck but was able to proceed under her own steam to Freetown where she arrived at 1800/10. On 11 July 1940 Temporary Acting Rear-Admiral Onslow reverted to his rank of Captain. Damage to the Richelieu. The Admiralty tried to find out if Richelieu was indeed ‘definitely disabled’ as Acting Rear-Admiral Onslow had claimed. Before the end of the month further reports became available. Commander Rushbrooke, the former British Naval Liaison Officer at Dakar was at Dakar in the merchant vessel Argyll during the attacks which was moored only 3 cables away from the Richelieu on her port beam. Commander Rushbrooke had had a ringside seat. On his arrival at Freetown he reported that at 0230/8 funnel explosions were heard from the direction of the Richelieu which gave the impression that the fuel supply to her furnaces was not normal. These explosions had occurred before and one must take into account that the Richelieu was brand new and not fully completed at that time let alone be fully worked up and possibly suffering from small defects which had not fully be remedied during her trial period. Following these explosions, two officers, which were on the bridge of the Argyll did not see any special activity on board the Richelieu nor in the harbour. These funnel explosions were probably the explosions heard by Lt.Cdr. Bristowe around 0230 hours. Shortly after 0500/8, Commander Rushbrooke and the same two officers witnessed the air attack and at 0507 hours heard two dull thuds. When full daylight broke they saw a patch of oil round the Richelieu’s stern, which also appeared to be slightly down in the water. Later she lowered her main aerials but soon rehoisted them. After pursuing all available reports, the Admiralty considered that the attack had been well conceived and executed, but that certain technical aspects required comment. The depth of the water at the time was 42 feet and the Richelieu’s draught was 26 feet 10 inches. In those conditions the setting of the torpedoes intended to run under the ship would have been about 3 feet more then the expected draught, or at most 33 feet (instead of 38 feet) and the setting of the contact torpedoes should have been at least 6 feet less the the draught, 21 feet at most (instead of 24 feet). In view of the shallowness of the water and the fact that the target was at anchor, too, the high speed setting of 40 knots should not have been used, as it was known that these torpedoes were liable to have an excessive initial dive on the 40 knot setting, and a much reduced one on the 29 knot setting. It was also pointed out in the Admiralty that 18” torpedoes containing about 440 lbs. of T.N.T. hitting the ships side within the length of the citadel would not defeat the main protection. They would cause little flooding but would allow oil to escape into the sea. Torpedoes fitted with Duplex pistols exploding under the ships bottom would not produce damage visible from outside the ship. Broken aerials are a feature of underwater explosions and new aerials may have been hoisted to replace broken ones, but from Commander Rushbrooke’s report it would appear that not more then one torpedo could have exploded under the Richelieu’s main machinery compartments. It was considered, therefore, that she could not be regarded as out of action, but still as seaworthy and able to steam at at least three-quarters speed with all her main armament capable of use. Actually the damage was more serious then this assessment. According to French sources which later became available, only one torpedo hit. It blew a hole 25 x 20 feet, fractured stern post, distorted the starboard inner shaft and flooded three compartments. She was rendered incapable of steaming more than half power, and repairs to restore seaworthiness took a year. But her main armament was intact which would be shown a few months later.

Royal Navy Light cruiser HMS Liverpool: Around 0430 hours (zone -2), HMS Liverpool (Capt. P.A. Read, RN), departed the Great Bitter lakes for Port Said where she arrived at 1000 hours. After fuelling she departed Port Said around 1700 hours for Alexandria where she arrived at 0200 the next morning.

Royal Dutch Navy Submarine HNMS O 9: HrMs O 9 (Lt. H.A.W. Goossens, RNN) participated in A/S exercises off Portland with HMS Olvina (Lt.Cdr. C.G. Cuthbertson, RNR).

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Olympus: At 0915 hours (zone -2), HMS Olympus (Lt.Cdr. H.G. Dymott, RN), was bombed and damaged by Italian aircraft while in dock in Malta. Repairs and refit were delayed and were only completed on 29 November 1940.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Oswald: HMS Oswald (Lt.Cdr. D.A. Fraser, RN) ended her 2nd war patrol at Alexandria.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Rainbow: HMS Rainbow (Lt.Cdr. L.P. Moore, RN) departed Aden for Suez.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Thames: Having completed a long refit at the Devonport Dockyard, HMS Thames (Lt.Cdr. W.D. Dunkerley, RN), departed Plymouth for the Clyde area. HMS Thames had arrived at Plymouth for a long refit on 8 July 1939. It was expected that her refit would take about 6 months but strain on the Dockyard due to wartime conditions and repair work to vessels with a higher priority kept delaying the work on HMS Thames. It therefore took almost a year for the refit to be completed.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Narwhal: HMS Narwhal (Lt.Cdr. R.J. Burch, DSO, RN) ended her 14th war patrol at Blyth.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Triad: At 1930 hours HMS Triad (Lt.Cdr. E.R.J. Oddie, RN) is bombed by a seaplane near position 65°15'N, 08°32'E and sustains slight damage to the CO2 cooling system, lamps and telephones.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Talisman: HMS Talisman (Lt.Cdr. P.S. Francis, RN) conducted torpedo discharge trials off Arrochar.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS H 44: HMS H 44 (Lt. E.D. Norman, RN) shifted from Lowestoft to Harwich.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS H 44: HMS H 44 (Lt. E.D. Norman, RN) shifted from Lowestoft to Harwich.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS H 49: HMS H 49 (Lt. M.A. Langley, RN) departed Dover for her 7th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol off Dover. She returned later the same day.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS H 50: HMS H 50 (Lt. A.R. Cheyne, RN) ended her 5th war patrol at Harwich.

Royal Navy Light cruiser HMS Fiji: HMS Fiji (Capt. W.G. Benn, RN) arrived at St.Lucia where she was oiled by the RFA tanker Bishopdale (8406 GRT, built 1937, master G.F. Rutter).

Royal Navy Destroyer HMS Broke: HMS Broke (Cdr. B.G. Scurfield, RN) rescued 15 survivors from the Estonian merchant Vapper that had been sunk the day before by U-34 south of Cape Clear in position 49°30'N, 09°15'W.

Royal Canadian Navy Destroyer HMCS Restigouche: HMS Restigouche (Cdr. H.N. Lay, RN) rescued 17 survivors from the Estonian merchant Vapper that had been sunk the day before by U-34 south of Cape Clear in position 49°30'N, 09°15'W.

French Navy Submarine FR Rubis: The Norwegian merchant Almora (2433 GRT, offsite link) was damaged after hitting a mine laid by the French submarine Rubis on 10 May 1940 (Lt. G.E.J. Cabanier) near Egersund, Norway in position 58°21'N, 06°01'E.

1941

Royal Dutch Navy Light cruiser HNMS Tromp: HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.W. Termijtelen, RNN) arrived at Surabaya, Java.

Royal Dutch Navy Submarine HNMS O 9: HrMs O 9 (Lt. H.A.W. Goossens, RNN) participated in A/S exercises off Campbeltown with HMS Valena (Lt.Cdr. A.F.C. Gray, RNR), HMS La Cordeliere (Lt. A.J.G. Barff, RNR) and HMS La Flore.

Royal Dutch Navy Submarine HNMS O 10: HrMs O 10 (Lt. J.H. Geijs, RNN) participated in A/S exercises off Tobermory together with HMS Asie (Skr. F.C. Butler, RNR), HMS Polka (T/Lt. K.C. Donaldson, RNVR), FFS Alysse and HMS Minuet (T/Lt. A.M. Sullivan, RNVR).

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Oberon: HMS Oberon (Lt.Cdr. E.F. Pizey, DSC, RN) departed Rothesay for special A/S trials in very deep water. She was escorted by HMS Breda (Capt.(Retd.) A.E. Johnston, RN) and HMS Kingfisher (Cdr.(Retd.) W.V.H. Harris, DSC, RN).

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Otway: HMS Otway (Lt.Cdr.(Retd.) J.R.G. Harvey, RN) participated in A/S exercises off Campbeltown.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Rover: HMS Rover (Lt.Cdr. R.M.T. Peacock, RN) shifted from Port Said to Suez.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Sealion: HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) sank the French fishing vessel Christus Regnat (28 GRT) with gunfire in the Bay of Biscay in position 45°50'N, 03°30'W. (All times are zone -2) 0030 hours - Sighted a French tuna fishing vessel. Closed. 0043 hours - Ordered the crew to abandon ship. 0047 hours - Opened fire with the 3" gun. 0051 hours - The vessel sank. 0100 hours - Picked up the French crew of 5.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Tuna: HMS Tuna (Lt.Cdr. M.K. Cavenagh-Mainwaring, DSO, RN) departed from Holy Loch for her 8th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Bay of Biscay. During the passage south through the Irish Sea she was escorted by HMS La Capricieuse (Lt.Cdr. G.W. Dobson, RNR) until 2400/8. No logs are available for this period so no map of this patrol can be displayed.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Talisman: After midnight HMS Talisman (Lt. M. Willmott, RN) was informed that the British merchant City of Auckland was being shelled by a U-boat (U-109) and she was ordered to assist her. She reached the position (33°14'N, 31°21'W) on 10 July but did not see anything except a baulk of timber. In fact the vessel had managed to make her escape.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS H 32: HMS H 32 (Lt. B.G. Heslop, DSC, RN) conducted A/S exercises off Campbeltown with HMS Bedlington (Skr. J.H.D. Dansie, RNR).

Royal Navy Submarine HMS H 43: HMS H 43 (Lt. J.D. Martin, RN) participated in A/S exercises off Lough Foyle.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS H 44: HMS H 44 (Lt. A.C.G. Mars, RN) is docked at Londonderry.

Polish Navy Submarine ORP Sokol: ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar B. Karnicki) departed Portsmouth for her 4th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Bay of Biscay.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS L 26: HMS L 26 (Lt. M.B. St. John, RN) shifted from Rothesay to Ardrossan for repairs.

1942

Royal Canadian Navy Corvette HMCS Buctouche: HMCS Buctouche (Skr.Lt. G.N. Downey, RCNR) picked up 15 survivors from the Norwegian merchant Moldanger. The Moldanger was torpedoed and sunk on 27 June 1942 in position 38°03'N, 70°52'W by German U-boat U-404.

Royal Navy Light cruiser HMS Manchester: HMS Manchester (Capt. H. Drew, DSC, RN) returned to Scapa Flow.

Royal Dutch Navy Submarine HNMS K XI: From 7 to 24 July 1942, HrMs K XI (Lt.Cdr. A.H. Deketh, RNN), participated in A/S exercises in the Gulf of Kutch.

Royal Dutch Navy Submarine HNMS O 21: HrMs O 21 (Lt.Cdr. J.F. van Dulm, RNN) conducted exercises off Dundee.

Royal Dutch Navy Submarine HNMS O 10: HrMs O 10 (Lt. Baron D.T. Mackay, RNN) participated in A/S exercises off Campbeltown with HMS La Cordeliere (A/Lt.Cdr. A.J.G. Barff, RNR) and HMS Bedlington (Skr. J.H.D. Dansie, RNR).

US Navy Submarine USS Narwhal: USS Narwhal (Lt.Cdr. C.W. Wilkins) left base for her 3th war patrol. She was to patrol off the Kuril Islands.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Otway: HMS Otway (Lt.Cdr.(Retd.) J.R.G. Harvey, RN) conducted exercises in the Clyde area with HMS Alecto (Cdr. J.R.S. Brown, RN) and HMS Z 5 (T/A/Lt.Cdr. S.T. Wenlock, RNR).

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Proteus: HMS Proteus (Lt. R.L. Alexander, RN) was undocked.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Seawolf: HMS Seawolf (Lt. R.P. Raikes, RN) was ordered to proceed to Lerwick.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Saracen: HMS P 247 (Lt. M.G.R. Lumby, RN) departed Holy Loch for the torpedo range at Arrochar. Later the same day the first of the torpedo discharge trials was carried out.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Seraph: HMS P 219 (Lt. N.L.A. Jewell, RN) conducted D/G trials off Helensburgh.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Traveller: On or around this date HMS Traveller (Lt. M.B. St. John, RN) is expected to arrive at Haifa. The exact date she arrived is (so far) unknown to us.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Unrivalled: At 1050 hours HMS P 45 (Lt. H.B. Turner, RN), from a distance of 6 miles, sighted a submarine which could have been either the Soviet submarine K-21 or a U-boat. P 45 closed to 4.5 miles before the submarine turned away and contact was lost.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS H 28: HMS H 28 (Lt. J.S. Bridger, RN) participated in A/S exercises off Campbeltown.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS H 33: HMS H 33 (Lt. D. Lambert, DSC, RN) participated in A/S exercises off Campbeltown.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS H 34: HMS H 34 (Lt. A.D. Piper, DSC, RNR) participated in A/S exercises off Lough Foyle.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS H 44: HMS H 44 (Lt. J.P. Fyfe, RN) participated in A/S exercises off Lough Foyle.

US Navy Submarine USS S-31: USS S-31 (Lt.Cdr. T.F. Williamson) departed from Dutch Harbour, Alaska for her 1st offensive war patrol. She was ordered to patrol of the western Aleutians.

US Navy Submarine USS S-32: USS S-32 (Lt.Cdr. M.G. Schmidt) departed from Dutch Harbour for her 1st offensive war patrol. She was ordered to patrol off the western Aleutians. S-32 had already made two defensive patrols in the Panama Canal Zone.

US Navy Submarine USS S-33: USS S-33 (Lt. W.P. Schoeni) departed from Dutch Harbour for her 1st offensive war patrol. She was ordered to patrol off the western Aleutians. S-33 had already made several defensive patrols in the Panama Canal Zone.

US Navy Submarine USS S-38: USS S-38 (Lt.Cdr. H.G. Munson) ended her 6th war patrol at Brisbane. She was forced to return to base early because of mechanical problems.

US Navy Submarine USS R-4: USS R-4 (Lt. P.W. Garnett, USN) conducted exercises off Key West.

US Navy Submarine USS R-10: USS R-10 (Lt.Cdr. B.E. Lewellen, USN) conducted exercises off Key West.

US Navy Submarine USS R-14: USS R-14 (Lt.Cdr. G.W. Kehl, USN) conducted exercises off Key West.

US Navy Submarine USS R-20: USS R-20 (Lt.Cdr. C.B. Stevens, Jr., USN) conducted exercises off Key West.

Soviet Navy Submarine USSR ShCh-406: At 1428 hours, ShCh-408 attacks a convoy and fires one torpedo against ' what is identified as ' a merchant of 6000 GRT. The torpedo missed the target.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS L 23: HMS L 23 (Lt. L.F.L. Hill, RNR) conducted exercises off Blyth with a training class off new submariners.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS L 26: HMS L 26 (Lt. C.A. Pardoe, RNR) conducted exercises in the Clyde area with a training class of new submariners.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS L 27: HMS L 27 (Lt. G.D.N. Milner, DSC, RN) returned to the Philadelphia Navy Yard.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS P 614: HMS P 614 (Lt. D.J. Beckley, RN) is ordered to proceed to Polyarnoe, northern Russia.

1943

Royal Dutch Navy Light cruiser HNMS Tromp: HrMs Tromp (Capt. J.B. de Meester, RNN) departed Fremantle to proceed at high speed towards position 27.29'S, 106.29'E where the American cargo ship American Manufacturer (6678 GRT, built 1941) reported being attacked by an enemy submarine. This alert was later cancelled and Tromp was recalled to Fremantle.

Royal Dutch Navy Submarine HNMS O 9: HrMs O 9 (Lt.Cdr. J.F. Drijfhout van Hooff, RNN) participated in A/S exercises off Campbeltown with HMS St. Modwen (Lt.Cdr. J.M. Lycett, RD, RNR) and HMS Spaniel.

US Navy Submarine USS Seadragon: USS Seadragon (Cdr. R.L. Rutter, USN) arrived at Pearl Harbour.

US Navy Submarine USS Permit: USS Permit (Lt.Cdr. W.G. Chapple) torpedoed and sank the Japanese merchant Showa Maru (2212 GRT) off Otaru, Hokkaido, Japan in position 43°14'N, 139°53'E.

US Navy Submarine USS Plunger: USS Plunger (Lt.Cdr. R.H. Bass) torpedoed and damaged the Japanese merchant Anzan Maru (5493 GRT, built 1919) in the Sea of Japan in position 37°14'N, 132°57'E.

US Navy Submarine USS Harder: USS Harder (Cdr. S.D. Dealey) ended her 1st war patrol at Midway.

US Navy Submarine USS Peto: USS Peto (Lt.Cdr. W.T. Nelson) torpedoed and damaged the Japanese oiler Shinkoku Maru (10020 GRT) north-east of Manus in position 00°35'N, 148°00'E.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Ursula: HMS Ursula (T/Lt. M.D. Tattersall, RNVR) conducted A/S exercises off Campbeltown with HMS Boarhound (Skr. A. Keable, RNR).

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Oberon: HMS Oberon (Lt.Cdr. J.W. McCoy, DSC, RN) was undocked.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Oberon: HMS Oberon (Lt.Cdr. J.W. McCoy, DSC, RN) is undocked.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Otus: HMS Otus (Lt. H.R.B. Newton, DSC, RN) conducted exercises in the Clyde area.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Parthian: HMS Parthian (Lt. C.A. Pardoe, RNR) ended her 20th war patrol (18th in the Mediterranean) at Malta.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Proteus: HMS Proteus (Lt. A.R. Profit, DSC, RN) conducted exercises off Larne with HMS Truant (Lt.Cdr. J.G. Hopkins, RN) and HMS Tally-Ho (Lt.Cdr. L.W.A. Bennington, DSO, DSC, RN).

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Rorqual: HMS Rorqual (Lt.Cdr. L.W. Napier, DSO, RN) torpedoed and sank the German tanker Wilhemsburg (7020 GRT, former Greece Petrakis Nomikou, built 1914) about 5 nautical miles west of Tenedos Island, Greece in position 39°55'N, 25°50'E. (All times are zone -3) 0510 hours - While Rorqual was in position 310° Ponente light (Tenedos) 13 nautical miles, two destroyers were sighted 4 nautical miles away slowly proceeding towards the Dardanelles. Lt.Cdr. Napier judged that this must be the escort for the expected convoy. 0703 hours - Smoke was seen coming from the straits and the destroyers made off to close the straits. 0802 hours - The convoy was seen to form up. It consisted of a large tanker, the two destroyers sighted earlier, a corvette with three aircraft overhead. 0859 hours - Fired four torpedoes. Two hits were obtained. Immediately after the attack 16 depth charges were dropped. They were near enough to do some light damage such as to lights and some minor fittings. 1025 hours - Another 10 depth charges were dropped but these were not at all close. 1050 hours - Rorqual returned to periscope depth. The corvette was seen hunting about two nautical miles away. Nothing else was in sight. [The convoy attacked was made up of the above mentioned Wilhemsburg as well as the German merchant Gerda Toft (1960 GRT, former Danish, built 1930). They were escorted by the Italian destroyer Turbine, the Italian torpedo-boat Monzambano as well as the German auxiliary submarine chasers UJ-2102 and UJ-2104. They were on a trip from the Dardanelles to Piraeus.]

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Sealion: HMS Sealion (Lt. N.J. Coe, DSC, RNR) conducted attack exercises in the Clyde area. [Most likely these were for the C.O.Q.C. (Commanding Officers Qualifying Course) but this is not specified in the ships logbook.]

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Satyr: For the daily positions of HMS Satyr during her 3rd war patrol see the map below.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Satyr: HMS Satyr (Lt. T.S. Weston, RN) departed Holy Loch for her 3rd war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Bay of Biscay. During passage South through the Irish Sea she was escorted by HMS Scimitar (Lt.Cdr. C.G. Cuthbertson, DSC, RNR).

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Shakespeare: HMS Shakespeare (Lt. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSC, RN) arrived off Gela, Sicily, Italy to reconnoitre the landing beaches.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Stoic: HMS Stoic (Lt. P.B. Marriot, DSO, RN) conducted torpedo discharge trials off Arrochar.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Syrtis: In the early evening HMS Syrtis (Lt M.H. Jupp, DSC, RN) sighted a German U-boat in position 62°42'N, 03°07'E. An attack was started but the range could not be closed so the attack had to be broken off. The enemy submarine sighted was most likely the U-269.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Thrasher: HMS Thrasher (Lt.Cdr. A.R. Hezlet, DSC, RN) conducted exercises for the C.O.Q.C. (Commanding Officers Qualifying Course) at Scapa Flow.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Trooper: HMS Trooper (Lt. G.S.C. Clarabut, RN) departed from Port Said for her 6th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Adriatic and off the West coast of Greece. For the daily and attack positions of HMS Trooper during this patrol see the map below.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Tantalus: HMS Tantalus (Lt.Cdr. H.S. Mackenzie, DSO and Bar, RN) participated in A/S exercises at Scapa Flow.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Upright: HMS Upright (Lt. P.R.H. Harrison, DSO, DSC, RN) conducted exercises of Blyth training a class of new submariners.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS United: HMS United (Lt. J.C.Y. Roxburgh, DSC, RN) departed Malta for her 19th war patrol (also 19th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol off the Gulf of Taranto. No log is available for this period so map for this patrol can be displayed.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Untiring: HMS Untiring (Lt. R. Boyd, DSC, RN) conducted attack exercises in the Clyde area during which HMS Breda (Capt.(Retd.) A.E. Johnston, RN) and HMS Blade (T/A/Lt.Cdr. S.T. Wenlock, RNR) served as the targets. Upon completion of these exercises HMS Untiring returned to Holy Loch.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS H 28: HMS H 28 (Lt. E.C. Croswell, DSC, RN) shifted from Yarmouth to Plymouth.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS H 32: HMS H 32 (Lt. J.A.R. Troup, DSC, RN) conducted A/S exercises off Lough Foyle with HMS Warwick (Cdr. Y.M. Cleeves, DSO, DSC, RD, RNR).

Royal Navy Submarine HMS H 33: HMS H 33 (T/Lt. C.P. Thode, RNZNVR) participated in A/S exercises off Ardrishaig with ML's.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS P 511: HMS P 511 (Lt. C.W. Taylor, RNR) conducted A/S exercises off Lough Foyle together with HMS Fame (Capt. R. Heathcote, DSO, RN) and HMS Landguard (Lt.Cdr. (retired) T.S.L. Fox-Pitt, RN).

US Navy Corvette USS Surprise: USS Surprise takes of 18 men from the American merchant Thomas Sinnickson that was torpedoed and damaged by German U-boat U-185 about 125 nautical miles east of Fortaleza, Brazil in position 03°51'S, 36°22'W. After a crack appeared in the bulkhead between the engine room and #3 hold, the officers came to the conclusion that the ship is lost and at daylight on 8 July all hands abandoned ship and were picked up by the corvette, which scuttled the wreck by gunfire at 1430 hours.

US Navy Submarine USS R-2: USS R-2 (Lt. A.K. Tyree, USN) conducted exercises off Key West.

US Navy Submarine USS R-4: USS R-4 (Lt.Cdr. W.L. Fey, Jr., USN) conducted exercises off Key West.

US Navy Submarine USS R-10: USS R-10 (Lt.Cdr. E.D`H. Haskins, USN) conducted exercises off Key West.

US Navy Submarine USS R-13: USS R-13 (Lt.Cdr. D.L. Mehlop, USN) conducted exercises off Key West.

US Navy Submarine USS R-14: USS R-14 (Lt.Cdr. R. Holden, USN) conducted exercises off Key West.

US Navy Submarine USS R-20: USS R-20 (Lt.Cdr. E.T. Shepard, USN) conducted exercises off Key West.

Soviet Navy Submarine USSR ShCh-201: Shch-201 fires 6 torpedoes against a convoy made up of the Romanian merchant Ardeal (5695 BRT), the Bulgarian merchant Varna (2141 BRT), the Romanian destroyers Maresti, Marasesti and the Romanian minesweepers Locotenant-Commandor Stihi Eugen and Sublocotenant Ghiculescu some 30 nautical miles west of Yevpatoriya, Crimea in position 45°05'N, 32°43'E. All six torpedoes missed their target. Marasesti claims to have sunk the attacking submarine but this is incorrect.

US Navy Submarine USS S-15: USS S-15 (Lt.Cdr. F.C. Acker, USN) conducted exercises off Key West.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS L 26: HMS L 26 (Lt. H.D. Verschoyle, DSC, RN) conducted exercises in the Clyde area with a training class of new submariners.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS L 27: HMS L 27 (Lt. R.G.P. Bulkeley, RN) participated in A/S exercises off Campbeltown.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS P 614: HMS P 614 (Lt. H.W. Wilkinson, RN) participated in A/S exercises off Simonstown.

1944

US Navy Battleship USS Iowa: USS Iowa (Capt. J.L. McCrea, USN) anchored off Saipan Island and fuelled the destroyers USS Lardner (Lt.Cdr. J.D. Parker, USN) and USS McCalla (Lt.Cdr. E.K. Jones, USN). She got underway again later the same day.

Royal Dutch Navy Submarine HNMS K XI: HrMs K XI (Lt.Cdr. P.G. de Back, RNN) conducted A/S exercises off Madras.

Royal Dutch Navy Submarine HNMS O 10: HrMs O 10 (Lt.Cdr. A. van Altena, RNN(R)) participated in A/S exercises off Campbeltown.

Royal Dutch Navy Submarine HNMS Dolfijn: During her refit at Dundee, HrMs Dolfijn (Lt.Cdr. H.M.L.F.E. van Oostrom Soede, RNN), is docked in the Victoria Dock.

US Navy Submarine USS Seawolf: USS Seawolf (Lt.Cdr. R.B. Lynch) ended her 13th war patrol at Pearl Harbor. She was now sent to Darwin, Australia. Her 14th war patrol was a special mission to Tawitawi in the Sulu Archipelago.

US Navy Submarine USS Bonefish: USS Bonefish (Lt.Cdr. L.L. Edge) sank the Japanese guard boat Ryuei Maru (207 GRT) with gunfire off Tarakan, Borneo, Netherlands East Indies in position 02°40'N, 118°22'E.

US Navy Submarine USS Flasher: USS Flasher (Cdr. R.T. Whitaker) torpedoed and sank the Japanese troop transport Koto Maru No.2 (3557 GRT) off Cape Varella, French Indochina in position 13°08'N, 109°28'E.

US Navy Submarine USS Mingo: USS Mingo (Lt.Cdr. J.J. Staley) torpedoed and sank the Japanese destroyer Tamanami (offsite link) about 150 nautical miles west-south-west of Manila, Philippines in position 13°55'N, 118°30'E.

US Navy Submarine USS Sunfish: USS Sunfish (Lt.Cdr. E.E. Shelby) sank the Japanese fishing vessels Hokuyo Maru No.105, Kannon Maru No.5, Ebisu Maru, and Kinei Maru with gunfire off the Kuril Islands in position 47°29'E, 152°29'E. Note; Some sources, based on the sub's patrol report, give that Sunfish sank 13 fishing vessels on this day, but this can't be confirmed.

US Navy Submarine USS Skate: USS Skate (Cdr. W.P. Gruner, Jr.) torpedoed and sank the Japanese destroyer Usugumo (2000 tons, offsite link) and torpedoed and damaged the Japanese cargo vessel Kasado Maru about 160 nautical miles north of Etorofu Jima in position 47°43'N, 147°55'E.

US Navy Submarine USS Batfish: USS Batfish (Cdr. J.K. Fyfe, USN) ended her 3rd war patrol at Midway. Refit was performed by USS Proteus.

US Navy Submarine USS Becuna: At 2013 hours (time zone Q, 4), USS Becuna (Cdr. H.D. Sturr, USN), fired four stern torpedoes at a surfaced submarine in position 18°49'N, 68°06'W. No enemy submarine was however operating in this area.

US Navy Submarine USS Bergall: USS Bergall (Cdr. J.M. Hyde, USN) conducted exercises in the New London area together with USS Jenks (Lt.Cdr. M.F. Cocroft, USNR), USS Coffman (Lt.Cdr. W.D. Day, USNR) and USS SC-642.

US Navy Submarine USS Hardhead: USS Hardhead (Cdr. F. McMaster) arrived at Pearl Harbor.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Rover: HMS Rover (Lt. A.R. Profit, RN) was undocked.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Safari: HMS Safari (Lt.Cdr.(Retd.) J.R.G. Harvey, RN) conducted night attack exercises for the C.O.Q.C. (Commanding Officers Qualifying Course) in the Clyde area with HMS Milford (Lt.Cdr. G.G. Slade, RN). Upon completion of these exercises HMS Sealion proceeded to Rothesay.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Sceptre: HMS Sceptre (Lt. I.S. McIntosh, MBE, DSC, RN) is undocked.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Shakespeare: HMS Shakespeare (Lt. D. Swanston, DSC and Bar, RN) conducted A/S exercises with HMS Bellona (Capt. C.F.W. Norris, RN).

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Sirdar: HMS Sirdar (Lt. J.A. Spender, RN) departed Trincomalee for her 4th war patrol (2nd in the Far East). She was ordered to patrol off the West coast of Siam, near Phuket. She was escorted out by HMS Maid Marion (T/Lt. F.R. Crawford, RNVR). For the daily and attack positions of HMS Sirdar during this patrol see the map below.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Stratagem: HMS Stratagem (Lt. C.R. Pelly, DSC, RN) ended her 3rd war patrol (1st in the Far East) at Trincomalee. She was escorted in by HMS Maid Marion (T/Lt. F.R. Crawford, RNVR).

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Sturdy (ii): HMS Sturdy (Lt. W.St.G. Anderson, DSC, RNR) sank two sailing vessels with gunfire off the west coast of Siam. (All times are zone -6.5) 1845 hours - Surfaced in position 06°54'N, 99°28'E. 1915 hours - Boarded a 30 tons junk. Cargo was rice. Took one prisoner and placed demolition charges. 1930 hours - The junk exploded and sank in position 06°54'N, 99°32'E. 1955 hours - Board a junk of 87 tons. Cargo was rice. Took a prisoner and placed demolition charges. 2005 hours - The junk exploded and sank in position 06°55'N, 99°35'E.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Tuna: HMS Tuna (A/Lt.Cdr. L.F.L. Hill, RNR) departed Blyth for Port H.H.Z. She was escorted by HMS ML 229 (T/Lt. W.C.R. Walsh, RNVR) until 1551/7 when HMS Castlenau (Skr. W.K. Mickleburgh, RNR) took over the escort.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Thrasher: HMS Thrasher (Lt.Cdr. M.F.R. Ainslie, DSO, DSC, RN) shifted from Holy Loch to Arrochar.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Trusty: HMS Trusty (Lt. L.E. Herrick, DSO, RN) departed from Scapa Flow for Dundee. She is escorted by HMS Kingston Topaz (Skr.Lt. J.E. Harwood, RD, RNR).

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Trump: HMS Trump (Cdr. E.F. Balston, DSO, RN) performs full power trials on the Arran measured mile. These had to be abandoned due to a defect to the starboard engine.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Upright: HMS Upright (Lt. J.A.L. Wilkinson, RN) conducted A/S exercises off Campbeltown with HMS Shemara (Cdr.(Retd.) H. Buckle, RN) and HMS St. Modwen (Lt.Cdr. J.M. Lycett, DSC, RD, RNR).

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Unbending: HMS Unbending (Lt. J. Whitton, DSC, RN) conducted exercises off Blyth with a training class of new submariners.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS United: During the night of 7/8 July 1944, HMS United (Lt. N.R. Wood, RN), conducted A/S exercises off Fishguard together with aircraft.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Unrivalled: HMS Unrivalled (Lt. D.S. Brown, RNVR) departed Tobermory for Rothesay. She was escorted by HMS Blade (T/A/Lt.Cdr. S.T. Wenlock, RNR).

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Varangian: HMS Varangian (Lt. G.J. Glennie, RANVR) participated in A/S exercises off Tobermory.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Uther: HMS Uther (Lt. R.A.A.C. Ward, DSC, RN) conducted A/S exercises off Campbeltown with HMS Boarhound (Skr. A. Keable, RNR) and HMS Bedlington (Skr. A.W. Peak, RNR).

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Urtica: HMS Urtica (Lt. K.H. Martin, RN) shifted from Arrochar to Holy Loch.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Venturer: HMS Venturer (Lt. J.S. Launders, DSC, RN) participated in exercises off Larne.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Vivid: HMS Vivid (Lt. J.C. Varley, RN) was undocked at Malta.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Vulpine: HMS Vulpine (T/Lt. P.S. Thirsk, DSC, RNR) conducted gunnery exercises off Campbeltown.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS H 43: HMS H 43 (Lt. F.R. Lawrence, RN) conducted practice attacks in the Clyde area on HMS Kihna (Cdr.(Retd.) T.J.T.C. Jenks, RN).

Royal Navy Submarine HMS H 50: HMS H 50 (Lt. W.T.J. Fox, RN) participated in A/S exercises off Campbeltown.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS P 512: HMS P 512 (Lt. J.A. Wingate, DSC, RN) participated in A/S exercises off Bermuda.

Royal Navy Corvette HMS Burdock: BAY OF BISCAY. HMS Burdock picked up approx. 200 survivors from torpedoed Fighter Direction Tender 216.(FDT 216). FDT 216 was torpedoed by a Junkers 88,as it was sinking the order to abandon ship was given and the ship deliberately sunk to keep it out of enemy hands. Five crew were lost, 1565310 ACI J H Ferguson RAFVR. 1036266 LAC J Gaughan RAFVR. 1001089 Cpl. G Logan RAFVR. 1434174 LAC R J Peckham MID RAFVR.1681468 ACI T C Rolt. RAFVR. My father Alan Hamilton was a survivor and is still with us at the grand age of 89.

US Navy Submarine USS R-1: USS R-1 (Lt. W.A. Schoenfeld, USN) conducted exercises off Bermuda.

US Navy Submarine USS R-2: USS R-2 (Lt.Cdr. L.G. Bernard, USN) conducted exercises off Key West.

US Navy Submarine USS R-4: USS R-4 (Lt.Cdr. W.L. Fey, Jr., USN) conducted exercises off Key West.

US Navy Submarine USS R-13: USS R-13 (Lt.Cdr. D.L. Mehlop, USN) conducted exercises off Key West.

US Navy Submarine USS R-14: USS R-14 (Lt.Cdr. R. Holden, USN) conducted exercises off Key West.

US Navy Submarine USS R-20: USS R-20 (Lt.Cdr. J.B. Dudley, USN) conducted exercises off Key West.

Royal Canadian Navy Destroyer HMCS Ottawa (ii): German U-boat U-678 was sunk in the English Channel south-west of Brighton, in position 50°32'N, 00°23'W, by depth charges from the Canadian destroyers HMCS Ottawa, HMCS Kootenay and the British corvette HMS Statice.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS L 23: HMS L 23 (Lt. H.R. Murray, RN) participated in A/S exercises off Digby.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS L 26: HMS L 26 (Lt. A.G. Prideaux, DSC, RN) participated in A/S exercises off Bermuda.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS L 27: HMS L 27 (Lt. J.N. Elliott, RN) conducted A/S exercises off Bermuda with HMS Mary Rose (Lt. A.L. Gulvin, RN) and HMCS Orkney (A/Lt.Cdr. V. Browne, RCNR).

1945

Royal Dutch Navy Submarine HNMS K XV: HrMs K XV (Lt.Cdr. Baron C.W.T. van Boetzelaer, RNN) landed stores on Pulau Damar.

Royal Dutch Navy Submarine HNMS O 21: HrMs O 21 (Lt. F.J. Kroesen, RNN) departed from Fremantle for her 21th war patrol (5th in the Far East, 1st of her 2nd deployment to the Far East). She was ordered to patrol along the South coast of Java and in the Sunda Strait area. No log is available for this period so unfortunately no map can be displayed.

Royal Dutch Navy Submarine HNMS O 23: HrMs O 23 (Lt.Cdr. A.J. Schouwenaar, RNN) conducted attack exercises in the Clyde area during which HMS Hastings (A/Cdr. E.A. Stocker, DSC, RN) served as the target. These included night exercises.

Royal Dutch Navy Submarine HNMS Zwaardvisch: HrMs Zwaardvisch (Lt. J. van Dapperen, RNN) arrived at Aden.

US Navy Submarine USS Mackerel: USS Mackerel departed Portsmouth, New Hampshire for New London, Connecticut.

US Navy Submarine USS Balao: USS Balao (Lt.Cdr. R.K. Worthington, USN) departed from Pearl Harbor for her 10th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol and to perform lifeguard duties to the east of Honshu, Japan. For the daily and attack positions of USS Balao during this patrol see the map below.

US Navy Submarine USS Billfish: USS Billfish (Lt.Cdr. L.C. Farley, USNR) conducted exercises off Midway.

US Navy Submarine USS Devilfish: USS Devilfish (Lt.Cdr. S.S. Mann, Jr.) ended her 3rd war patrol at Guam.

US Navy Submarine USS Roncador: USS Roncador (Cdr. E.R. Crawford, USN) departed Key West, Florida for Port Everglades, Florida.

US Navy Submarine USS Barbero: With her post refit torpedo trials completed, USS Barbero (Lt.Cdr. R.F. DuBois, USN), arrived at New London, Connecticut.

US Navy Submarine USS Catfish: USS Catfish (Lt.Cdr. W.A. Overton, USNR) conducted exercises off Pearl Harbour together with USS Coolbaugh (Lt.Cdr. S.E. Zimmerman, USNR), USS Jallao (Cdr. J.B. Icenhower, USN) and USS Searaven (Lt.Cdr. R.C. Smallwood, Jr., USN).

US Navy Submarine USS Trepang: While on her 5th war patrol USS Trepang (Cdr. A.R. Faust) torpedoed and sank the Japanese merchant cargo ship Koun Maru No.2 (606 GRT) east of Japan in position 42°21'N, 141°28'E.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Safari: HMS Safari (Lt.Cdr.(Retd.) J.R.G. Harvey, RN) departed the Clyde for Portsmouth.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Stubborn: HMS Stubborn (Lt. A.G. Davies, RN) is put on the slip at Fremantle.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Shalimar: HMS Shalimar (Lt.Cdr. W.G. Meeke, DSC, MBE, RN) departed Colombo for Trincomalee.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Stygian: HMS Stygian (Lt. G.S.C. Clarabut, DSO, RN) was undocked.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Sea Scout: HMS Sea Scout (Lt. J.W. Kelly, RN) sank a motor lugger with gunfire in the Gulf of Siam. (All times are zone -9) 1715 hours - Sighted a medium seized motor lugger coast crawling Northwards. 1724 hours - Surfaced in position 10°55'N, 99°30'E. Opened fire with the 4" gun from 1900 yards. The third round hit and when 12 rounds were fired the lugger sank. 1730 hours - Dived.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Saga: HMS Saga (T/Lt. P.S. Thirsk, DSC, RNR) departed Holy Loch for Scapa Flow.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Scorcher: HMS Scorcher (Lt. K.S. Renshaw, DSC, RNR) arrived at Malta.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Sidon: HMS Sidon (Lt. H.C. Gowan, RN) departed Fremantle for her 2nd war patrol (1st in the South-West Pacific area). She was ordered to patrol off Singapore for Air/Sea rescue duties. For the daily positions of HMS Sidon during this patrol see the map below. HMS Sidon 2nd war patrol click here for bigger map

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Ultor: HMS Ultor (Lt. J.P. Harvey, RN) participated in A/S exercises off Campbeltown.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Untiring: HMS Untiring (Lt. G.E.L.F. Edsell, RN) arrived at Malta.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Upstart: HMS Upstart (Lt. R. Westlake, RNVR) arrived at Malta.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Volatile: HMS Volatile (Lt. P.T. Miles, RN) returned to Douglas on completion of last night's exercises. She departed Douglas for Rothesay later the same day.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Amphion: HMS Amphion (Cdr. R.H. Dewhurst, DSO, RN) conducted torpedo discharge trials at the torpedo firing range off Arrochar.

Royal Navy Submarine HMS Astute: HMS Astute (A/Lt.Cdr. R. Gatehouse, DSC, RN) conducted attack exercises in the Clyde area during which HMS Hastings (A/Cdr. E.A. Stocker, DSC, RN) served as the target.

US Navy Submarine USS R-1: USS R-1 (Lt.Cdr. J.H. Cunningham, Jr., USNR) departed New London, Connecticut for Key West, Florida.

US Navy Submarine USS R-18: USS R-18 conducted exercises off Key West.

US Navy Submarine USS R-20: USS R-20 (Lt. R.G. Black, USNR) conducted exercises off Key West.

US Navy Submarine USS Irex: USS Irex (Cdr. J.D. Crowley, USN) arrived at Port Everglades, Florida from New London, Connecticut.

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